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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This potentially will be my first HD, but before I commit I want to get a few things clarified for the sake of peace of mind. Perhaps you can share some of your insights.

It is regarding a '03 Heritage Softail Classic with the 88B injected motor and 12000 km / 7500 miles on the clock. After test riding it for about a hour, and upon returning, I noticed these wet areas. Please see the attached picture; what you see is the front facing side of the front cylinder. The rear cylinder shows a similar weep on its rear facing side.

Since I am completely new to the Harley realm, I am curious to know if there is a known issue with these weeps from this type/model/year. I guess the low mileage over the past nineteen years doesn't help either eh? Anyhow, what does it take to fix it? And if I decide to have it fixed by a shop, how many shop hours do you feel is reasonable to see on the bill?

Thanks in advance!
 

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This potentially will be my first HD, but before I commit I want to get a few things clarified for the sake of peace of mind. Perhaps you can share some of your insights.

It is regarding a '03 Heritage Softail Classic with the 88B injected motor and 12000 km / 7500 miles on the clock. After test riding it for about a hour, and upon returning, I noticed these wet areas. Please see the attached picture; what you see is the front facing side of the front cylinder. The rear cylinder shows a similar weep on its rear facing side.

Since I am completely new to the Harley realm, I am curious to know if there is a known issue with these weeps from this type/model/year. I guess the low mileage over the past nineteen years doesn't help either eh? Anyhow, what does it take to fix it? And if I decide to have it fixed by a shop, how many shop hours do you feel is reasonable to see on the bill?

Thanks in advance!
Simple fix and not unexpected for a low mileage bike of that age. Just need a new set of rocker box gaskets. Not sure what the hour quote would be. Shouldn't be a whole lot.
 

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If that's leaking at the base box then the complete rocker box gasket kit should get installed, both covers. 2 - 3 hours labor.
 
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AmsterDam also find out if you can get the service records for that bike. The bike should have an owner's manual with it too. Service records are second only to the MoCo service manual required for taking care of your bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the feedback everyone.

- Just looked up a few videos with pointers on the rocker box gasket (kit) removal/installation and it looks like a job I feel relatively comfortable with.

- I am aware of the cam chain tensioners (issue) and will keep an eye on that one.

- Tires are good.

- Service manual ... PDF?

- Service records I do not have. I will start keeping records myself from here on.

I think I will ride it a few more months and order the gasket kit in the meantime. Then use the off-season to do a nice clean-up, replace the gaskets and winterize for the winter.
 

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Wonderful bike, you will absolutely love it! As mentioned take a look at the cam chain tensioners and you can buy a set with upgraded springs and pads which keeps you from having to replace the cam plate to use the hydraulic sets.
 

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Thanks for the feedback everyone.

- Just looked up a few videos with pointers on the rocker box gasket (kit) removal/installation and it looks like a job I feel relatively comfortable with.

- I am aware of the cam chain tensioners (issue) and will keep an eye on that one.

- Tires are good.

- Service manual ... PDF?

- Service records I do not have. I will start keeping records myself from here on.

I think I will ride it a few more months and order the gasket kit in the meantime. Then use the off-season to do a nice clean-up, replace the gaskets and winterize for the winter.
Tires good... By date code or by appearance? Date code matters. just sayin'
 

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I'd be much more concerned about the age of the Tires.
I agree, nice bikes whether collectors, anniversary models etc, low miles, obviously not ridden enough. Sitting longs periods of time, outside, I would think gaskets dry rotted. Tires, not riding and not kept off floor with bike lift, adds flat sides including dry rot, cracking sidewalls, etc. on side of tires should have manufacturing date, code info. Temps drop below freezing enables tires to loose air pressure also. Over inflated and under inflated also creates poor handling and uneven wear. Just a thought, remember to check oil on jiffy stand hot. Do not overfill until fixed. Tires, remember you on two wheels not 4. Ride safe, J.T.
 
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