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Discussion Starter #1
I had around 160-170 miles on the new rings, which, I know take longer to seat.
I had an emergency where I had to get there NOW, I turned the bike around and ripped on it to get to speed asap. Around 70mph. But definitely ripped through the rpm range.
Just wondering if that is enough to destroy any hope of properly seating the rings. I ripped on it that one time and only stayed at 70 mph for a few minutes.
Otherwise I have been extra careful with these rings since they are the chrome moly and not the cast. Been keeping it in the right rpm ranges, riding easy, and changing my rpms every couple miles, and definitely letting the engine get to op temp before riding.
 

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Imperial Wizard...
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4,956 Posts
Ahhhh......your fine...ride like you stole it.....but realy I dont have a clue..
 

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Fast Lane Crew
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I wouldn't worry about it. However, I would try not to do that so much until your rings have properly seated themselves. Other than that, enjoy the ride.
 

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This is what Hastings has to say about piston ring break in.
IMO, you did the right thing. No need to fix what isn't broken.

BREAK-IN PROCEDURE

1. Make a test run at 30 miles per hour and accelerate at full throttle to 50 miles per hour. Repeat the acceleration cycle from 30 to 50 miles per hour at least ten times. No further break-in is necessary. If traffic conditions will not permit this procedure, accelerate the engine rapidly several times through the intermediate gears during the check run. The object is to apply a load to the engine for short periods of time and in rapid succession soon after engine warm up. This action thrusts the piston rings against the cylinder wall with increased pressure and results in accelerated ring seating.

Following that,
Drive vehicle normally but avoid sustained high speed during the first 100 miles.
At no time should the engine be lugged. Lugging is said to exist when the engine does not respond when you twist the throttle.

Taken from Hastings piston ring website
Untitled Document
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thamks guys. I did a compression and leakdown test and everything is spot on. I put 300+ miles on yesterday with my ol lady and the bike responded exactly as it should have. I am thinking seating those rings aren't quite the nightmare people make them out to be. They are seated just fine.
 

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If the cylinders are prepared properly, ring break-in is fast and easy. On our racing engines, we'd pull a few minuets on the dyno, then pull the exhaust flanges and check for any sign of oil burning, no oil, then a few more runs and a leak down test. then go racing!
 

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Maddog
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394 Posts
Ring seating

Molly rings 'seat' very quickly. Like within a few minutes. It's ok to
run it hard, just don't abuse it. I seat molly rings with a couple full
throttle blips followed by varying the throttle up and down for about
40 miles.

That old attage of taking it easy is a bunch of nonsense. You WANT
full pressure on the rings while the crosshatch hone pattern is still
fresh. This forces the rings against the cylinder walls at high pressure
to achieve maximum seal.

Run it hard briefly but dont go overboard. I.e: don't get it super hot.
You'll have a better ring seal and better running engine as a result.
 
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