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Hey guys!

Question about gas and more gas.

First off, according to the specs, my 2014 Road King should have a 6 gallon gas tank.

Now, as it stands right now, I find myself riding to the fuel light coming on at 57 or so miles to the range, and filling up around 20 to 30 miles left.

At that point I usually fill up the tank with 4.5 to 4.7 gallons at the pump before it shuts off.

According to the actual trip odometer, I'm getting about 200 miles to those fillups, sometimes less. I just feel as though for a "6 gallon tank", I should be able to get way more than 200 miles to a filling.

With my commute, however, this leads me filling up once every 4 days. This mostly consists of freeway riding at 70 - 75 mp (2.5 to 2.7k rpm).

My two questions are:

1. Are people filling up closer to the stated 6 gallon capacity?

2. Are these range, fuel mileage, and trip meter readings in line with what you'd expect for a Road King?

I suppose I'm just trying to understand the vehicle as best I can :grin

Thanks in advance!!
 

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Your tank is 6 gallons, some of that is Reserve and you are using most of it. When you fill up next time shake the handlebars and you will see the gas go down. I always do this 3-5 times and get it up to 5.4 - 5.7 gallons in
 

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My 6 Gal Tank does the same. Depending on riding style I usually get 39 miles per gallon. I don't shake the bike when filling very often so with a little math I get about 200 Miles on a tank.

Be careful of the final miles on your guage indicator. I was in a hurry to get 12 more miles once and my gas indicator said I had 30 miles left. I was really riding hard and the indicator went to"LO" before I finished that 12 miles. Yes there is a LO after the mileage stops counting down. I haven't run out yet but I've hit LO at least twice.

I don't pay much attention any more. I just fill it when it gets low.
 

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Keep on Ridin’
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A couple of things to consider. On a bike, there is no filler neck like on a car. The pump hose nozzle is going directly into the tank. Therefore, the automatic shutoff happens with the tip of the nozzle extended below the the top of the tank -- so it shuts off before the tank is completely full. While "topping off" is not advised on cars, it may be necessary to carefully pull the tip of the nozzle up a little and carefully finish filling the tank while visually keeping an eye on the fuel level inside the tank opening. That will allow you to get a little more fuel into the tank, using more of the tank's capacity. With the bike on the jiffy stand, the lean angle should still leave enough of an air space to allow for expansion. Another thing to remember is that on a fuel injected bike the fuel pump/sending unit is inside the tank and takes up a little space. I'm not sure if the rated tank capacity is calculated to account for this space or not, but it could affect the amount of usable fuel. Regardless, the pump is not going to be able to pump every last ounce of fuel out of the tank. A carburetor tank will actually gravity drain more completely.

When figuring your MPG, it is important to be consistent in your method of filling the tank to the same level to calculate the amount of fuel used for the miles traveled.

One last thing to consider is that the electric fuel pump motor depends on being submerged in fuel for cooling. This is true for cars and trucks as well. So whenever possible, it's better for the pump to not run the fuel level all the way down to minimum unless necessary.

--
 
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I've put nearly 20,000 miles on my 2014 Road King. The gas gauge and the miles to empty display have been very accurate and consistent. I know in advance just about how much gas it will take to fill the tank. I've been getting about 46 mpg.

af
 

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Señor Member
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I have a 2011 Road King with a 6 gallon tank.

When you're figuring gas mileage, divide the miles ridden by the fuel USED. (How much you just fit in there is equal to what you burned.) Do not divide by the tank capacity.

The gas light is very, very conservative. It comes on too early. I've ran it down to "Lo" and only fit 5.2 or so in there. I probably could have ridden another 30-35 miles.

It's a 6 gallon tank, I promise. You're just not emptying it all the way.
 

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when i filled up friday i pumped 5.4 gallons and was on 226 miles so thats 42mpg. i keep a eye on my mpg and i 9 times out of 10 get 42mpg. the most i have ever pumped is 5.9 gallons and the low fuel light was shinning like the north star and when i fill up and i run 93 non ethanol
 

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Lost in Space
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Very rare for me to get over 5 gallons in the tank. That is with the count down going. Get about 39 mpg on my 09 king.
 

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Each response has been accurate and insightful, so not much for me to add comment about. There is one more thing to keep in mind...the low fuel light (on the dash) will illuminate when you have 1 gallon of fuel left in the tank. Therefore, if you went directly to the gas pump, the most you would be able to add to the tank will be 5 gallons. Your mpg will vary according to the type of driving you do (bet you haven't heard that before!). It takes more energy to push a motorcycle and rider through the wind at freeway speeds than it does for country cruising, therefore you will find that your mpg will be more efficient at lower averaged speeds. Country cruising requires a fill-up between 200-220 miles on my 2012 RKC. Freeway speeds requires a fill-up between 175-195 miles.
 

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Each response has been accurate and insightful, so not much for me to add comment about. There is one more thing to keep in mind...the low fuel light (on the dash) will illuminate when you have 1 gallon of fuel left in the tank. Therefore, if you went directly to the gas pump, the most you would be able to add to the tank will be 5 gallons. Your mpg will vary according to the type of driving you do (bet you haven't heard that before!). It takes more energy to push a motorcycle and rider through the wind at freeway speeds than it does for country cruising, therefore you will find that your mpg will be more efficient at lower averaged speeds. Country cruising requires a fill-up between 200-220 miles on my 2012 RKC. Freeway speeds requires a fill-up between 175-195 miles.

If I go directly to the pump when the fuel light goes on, I'd only fit maybe 4.2 or so gallons. If I go when the countdown until empty says "Lo," I can't fit 5.2 gallons in, or so.

Prez, I think you're spot on, but I think there's one gallon between the light turning on and the countdown going to "Lo." After that, I STILL have some pretty serious fuel left...more than a half gallon.
 

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If I go directly to the pump when the fuel light goes on, I'd only fit maybe 4.2 or so gallons. If I go when the countdown until empty says "Lo," I can't fit 5.2 gallons in, or so.

Prez, I think you're spot on, but I think there's one gallon between the light turning on and the countdown going to "Lo." After that, I STILL have some pretty serious fuel left...more than a half gallon.
Hmmm...you could be right. All I know is when my fuel light comes on it will display the miles left until empty(?). That number that is displayed usually matches my mpg number. Hence, my assumption that 1 gallon of fuel remains. As the dash display miles tick down, when I get to 10(?) miles remaining, then it will switch to "Lo" (as in get your a$$ to a gas station). Then, the pucker factor will start to ratchet up with each passing telephone pole.
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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On the 6 gal tank, you have "slosh baffles" to contend with. When the gas nozzle clicks off, you may find that you are still a long way from a full tank. Keep running the gas in at a very slow rate until it sits at the top of the fill neck without settling down to tank level. Rocking the bike a few times will settle it down to the top of the tank.
I have found that the miles to go 'til the "URF" (You are eff'd) indication is pretty accurate. Made it into a gas station in Bossier City, LA on the fumes and took 5.92 gallons which is pretty much what the indicator said to expect.
 

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Hmmm...you could be right. All I know is when my fuel light comes on it will display the miles left until empty(?). That number that is displayed usually matches my mpg number. Hence, my assumption that 1 gallon of fuel remains. As the dash display miles tick down, when I get to 10(?) miles remaining, then it will switch to "Lo" (as in get your a$$ to a gas station). Then, the pucker factor will start to ratchet up with each passing telephone pole.

You and I agree completely. Only difference is I don't pucker until "Lo" has been showing for a little while. :eek

Run her down to "Lo," and go fill up. I bet you don't get 5.3 in her.
 

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On the 6 gal tank, you have "slosh baffles" to contend with. When the gas nozzle clicks off, you may find that you are still a long way from a full tank. Keep running the gas in at a very slow rate until it sits at the top of the fill neck without settling down to tank level. Rocking the bike a few times will settle it down to the top of the tank.

I have found that the miles to go 'til the "URF" (You are eff'd) indication is pretty accurate. Made it into a gas station in Bossier City, LA on the fumes and took 5.92 gallons which is pretty much what the indicator said to expect.

I top that sucker off to the bottom of the cup.
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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Chief, it took me a few trips before I discovered the secret, but I get every drop I can in that sucker these days. One trip out west where the locals say "the gas station is up the road another 120 miles" makes you figure stuff out real fast.
 

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Your tank is a 6 gallon tank. My 2012 Sportster 1200C and my 2014 Dyna Low Rider both had 4.5 and 4.75 gallon tanks, respectfully. But, you will never get to completely dry (empty) and put that much fuel in the tank. The reason is those tanks were originally on bikes with carbs and gravity flow fuel tanks. Our bikes have fuel pumps and filters inside them and they take up space. I ran my Sportster to a gas station sputtering out of fuel and only put in 4.1 gallons. I ran my Dyna completely until it died and only put in 4.2 gallons. I've had the fuel pump and filter assembly out of the Sportster and it is quite large and takes up a lot of space inside that tank. To bad, Harley couldn't have designed an external pump or made the tank just a bit bigger or better yet, just advertise the tank size for what we can really put into it.

I agree with a previous post. The tanks are divided and fuel needs to slowly find its way to the left hand side by way of a 3/8 hose connecting the two. So, when you think you are empty, you have some fuel on the right side and if the bike quits due to running out of fuel. Lean the bike way to the left and hold it a bit and hopefully some of that right side fuel will make it to the left side. The sportster pickup for the fuel pump was on the left side.
 

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One thing I do when leaving town is I carry 2 backpack type fuel container that holds about 20 ounces of fuel. They are aluminum with good seals, I bought my at Bass Pro in the camping department. I figure in an emergency that will get me another 14 miles. They fit nicely in my throw over leather bags.
 
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