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Back in about 1987 I had a new 883. It specified 50 wt oil to go in it. Is that still the case?
 

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The recommendation is now 20W-50, either dino or synthetic.
 

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The classic warplanes my son maintains have a fuel injection circuit you'll find surprising.
They use straight 60W or heavier oil, but they had to be ready to go even if it was 30 below, to make the oil thin enough to get thru the cold engine so it can start when it is cold, they had a special "injector" which I'm sure is just a pump that pumped raw fuel into the oil flow into the engine. Deliberately and grossly thinning out the oil with raw fuel. They didn't think it mattered, the oil gets pretty hot in a 3350 cubic inch air cooled engine, it is assumed the fuel contamination gets evaporated off. Besides, radial engines are not known for their lack of leaks, the common Wright 3350 my son says is known as the Wright "dirtythree-50"

You might wonder what kind of oil filter would handle 60W oil.
Answer: What's an oil filter?
 

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Thanks guys. I just bought a 2000 883/1200 and didn't get a manual with it. I have one ordered but didn't want to wait to change the oil. Just makes me nervous not knowing what is in there.
 

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Thanks guys. I just bought a 2000 883/1200 and didn't get a manual with it. I have one ordered but didn't want to wait to change the oil. Just makes me nervous not knowing what is in there.
Aah, in that case, stick with dino oil for atleast 1000 miles.


edit: NM, missed the part where you said it was a '00. Im guessing it already has 1000 miles. :eek:
 

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Runs as cool with the 50wt as it does with Synthetic, at 158-168* oil temp on even hot (90* + days) in moderate traffic conditions.
I do not think this is good news. I think it means a dipstick mounted temp probe, which I assume is what you have, is not giving you the information you want. I'll bet the oil in the return line is a whole bunch hotter than that. The important temperature we wish we knew, in order to feel good about the oil's capability, is the temp when and where the oil is doing it's job.

On an air cooled engine on a hot day, especially in traffic, I can't believe that there is ANY part of the engine that is not much hotter than that. I'll bet the oil passing thru the cylinder heads is a getting to well over 250 degrees, so if your temp probe is on the dipstick cap, I'd be afraid that means that there is so little oil circulation, that even if the oil coming back from the engine is boiling, the oil reservoir never gets that hot.

Even if you had an oil cooler, I would think that if you were going to measure the oil temp, to be sure it can take the conditions, it should be measured just as it exits from the engine. You are very comfortable with your grade of oil, because of that low reading of under 170, what would you think if the oil coming out of the engine was actually 340 ?
 

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See if you can get a reading on the oil return line close as possible to the hot end, even let it soak for a minute after the wind stops.

Shoot the engine every place you can think of, see if my prediction that every part of the engine is hotter than that oil reading is accurate.

Gotta get me a point and click thermometer.
 

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Twin cams are known to run hotter then Evos.
One of the reasons for this is that TC motors have cooling jets that spray oil on to the underside of the pistons to cool them down, thus raising the oil temperature.
 

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It would be good to know similar numbers on a TC, especially in an extreme situation, like either run hard on a hot day, or sitting stuck in traffic on a hot day. What I'm pondering is the benefit of an oil cooler.

I am inclined to think oil kept at a high normal temperature during 95% of the engines running time, is probably healthier oil than oil kept cool, or run for short distances so it rarely gets good and hot for a long time. Moisture and fuel contamination are inevitable, circulating at high normal temperature should help cast off both of those evils.
 

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Highest I've seen my oil temp go was 250F as measured with the analog oil dipstick shortly after my motor build.
This was when ambient temp was ~110F, prior to me installing an oil cooler.

I got the oil cooler with the built in thermostat which is a fairly discreet one (read you can probably find more efficient ones), and it lowered my oil temps by 25 - 30F.
 
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