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Discussion Starter #1
The last time I changed my fork oil I made a mess and figured there had to be a better way.

I took a length of 5/16 aluminum rod, turned down 3/8 of an inch down to 0.160, and threaded it for an M4, same as the fork drain plugs.

I then drilled it, and pushed some plastic tube on the other end.

After removing the fork drain and screwing it in, I attached the other end of the plastic tube to a plastic ketchup bottle which I got at the market for $1.00.

I thought this would be the perfect way to have a neat, mess free way of draining the forks.

Unfortunately, the largest hole you can put through the aluminum rod is a #44 drill bit, which was not large enough to permit air into the fork tube as the oil drained.

As I pumped the forks up and down, the oil was forced out and quickly sucked back in due to the lack of air transfer through the tube.

I forgot that I had a vacuum pump in the garage. Next time I will fit the vacuum pump where I had the ketchup bottle and I believe that will suck the oil out.

So damn close...
 

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That's cool and all. But how do you get the oil back in?
 

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That's cool and all. But how do you get the oil back in?
What I have done in the past is remove the shock caps, drill a hole in the center of the caps and tap them out for a 5/16" fine thread screw and use a nylon washer under the screw head. All I had to do then is drain the oil and replace it through the cap hole with a large syringe from an animal supply store. I have 2-1/2" spacers on top of my springs to eliminate spring sag and it's quite a chore to replace the caps. No more having to unscrew the caps and fighting the springs to screw them back on. Hey, it works for me.
p.s.
It's obvious that if you have solid spacers, they have to be drilled as well. duh.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What I have done in the past is remove the shock caps, drill a hole in the center of the caps and tap them out for a 5/16" fine thread screw and use a nylon washer under the screw head. All I had to do then is drain the oil and replace it through the cap hole with a large syringe from an animal supply store. I have 2-1/2" spacers on top of my springs to eliminate spring sag and it's quite a chore to replace the caps. No more having to unscrew the caps and fighting the springs to screw them back on. Hey, it works for me.
p.s.
It's obvious that if you have solid spacers, they have to be drilled as well. duh.
good idea. I think i would take it two steps farther. countersink and tap the hole for a flush fitting plug so nothing sticks out.
 

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good idea. I think i would take it two steps farther. countersink and tap the hole for a flush fitting plug so nothing sticks out.
That would probably be better if there's enough meat in the center of the cap. Actually, a chrome acorn head screw isn't bad looking though.
 
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