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Discussion Starter #1
I asked this next door and have the feeling that you all might have something more to offer:
Have you ever aquaplaned on a motorcycle? What was it like?
It seems to me that control in this situation is probably one of the most challenging we face on two wheels.
 

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ther·a·peu·tic
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I've never heard it called "aquaplaning" I've always heard "Hydroplaning" I know what you mean though. If you were in Mexico It would be aguaplaning...:D I have hit some standing water at speed and felt a little loss of control. I've seen cars spin out totally.

I think hitting an icy patch would be the worst situation :eek:. Tires are designed to channel water away and give you traction
 

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Just passing thru
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OK it's later.
I try not to ride in the rain if I can help it. When I have no choice I try to keep my speed below 40. More like 35 to avoid hydroplaning and panic stopping. I just recently witnessed a full size passenger truck hit a patch of standing water in the right lane of the highway doing about 65mph and the entire vehicle just jumped into the middle lane in an instant. If I were beside him when it happened I would have been shot like a pinball. Ride safe!
 

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On a ride
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Ride in rain all the time. Summer in the Rockies often mean daily thunderstorms. Real drenchers. Have never lost traction. To be sure, when the roads are wet, if heavy water is present, be smooth and slow down. If it's really bad... pull over.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've never heard it called "aquaplaning" I've always heard "Hydroplaning" I know what you mean though. If you were in Mexico It would be aguaplaning...:D I have hit some standing water at speed and felt a little loss of control. I've seen cars spin out totally.

I think hitting an icy patch would be the worst situation :eek:. Tires are designed to channel water away and give you traction
You know, I've called it hydroplaning my entire life, but after reading the word written by a British author.....
 

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I break stuff.
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Rain and ice are a fact of life in this area. The more you experience it, the more comfortable you will be with navigating through it.

It's all about having a confident "feel" for your bike, knowing what a slide feels like, and being smooth and deliberate in your application of throttle, clutch and brake. No room for panic. When the front end starts to feel "vague", and the back end feels like it's "walking" all over the place, do nothing suddenly. Remember to breathe, and be SMOOTH.

Folks who ride in the dirt have an advantage in this area - sliding around at low speeds teaches good traction management skills (think Chris Carr sliding around a dirt oval). Road racers will run harder or softer compound tires to maximixe traction on cooler/warmer days.

I took my best finishes at Blackhawk Farms in rain races. Wet situations were probably the only area where my street-riding habits HELPED me. Well, that and rain tires :)
 

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COB
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Hydroplaning is quite uncommon on motorcycles due to the tire being a round profile instead of flat on the bottom like a car. Roadracers only go about 10% slower in the rain and it is due to the reduced rubber that a grooved tire puts down.

It can happen, but it is not as common as on a car.
 

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Wet leaves on manhole covers in the fall will get ya too if your not carefull. Hit one at the wrong angle,(turning) It will wake you up quick.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Once I didn't notice a rear flat in progress until I was in a curving exit ramp, being at an angle rolled the tire off to the side, and I found chrome on asphalt to be an exceptionally slick ride.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Here's a question that just occurred to me. If you're cruising at speed, and find yourself on ice or something equally slick, would you be inclined to pull the clutch in and float thru it with as few forces acting possible? Anybody ride on ice enough to know what's the correct choice?
 

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Here's a question that just occurred to me. If you're cruising at speed, and find yourself on ice or something equally slick, would you be inclined to pull the clutch in and float thru it with as few forces acting possible? Anybody ride on ice enough to know what's the correct choice?
That would be my choice.
 

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Just passing thru
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Here's a question that just occurred to me. If you're cruising at speed, and find yourself on ice or something equally slick, would you be inclined to pull the clutch in and float thru it with as few forces acting possible? Anybody ride on ice enough to know what's the correct choice?
Well if you get the clutch in before you hit it then yes but my instinct would to be to stay at my current speed with no decel or acel during my ice capade. This is not advice though, it is what I would do unless I learned a more effective method.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Pulling the clutch would be an influence tending to change the motion of the motorcycle which has the potential to be a devastatingly perturbing event while the tires are in contact with any low friction surface. Because of this risk, I might just go along with 1 Mean Mother's thinking.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Well, I hope you never have to confirm it, but from my experience driving on ice in automobiles, I am nearly certain you will find that with the drivetrain in gear, clutch out, all coupled together, there is no way to have absolutely zero loading on the rear tire, and in the slickest conditions, even the tiniest possible loading, either accel or decel will cause the back end to slide, where un-coupling it by pulling in the clutch will completely unload the rear tire from even the smallest accel or decel loading.

When driving on glare ice in automatic trans equipped automobiles, shifting into neutral will sometimes allow you to maintain control and coast around slick corners and across bridges, where simply being in gear can make those things impassable.

It's a very small difference, but when there very little to no traction, a very small difference is all you have.
 

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COB
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I ride dirt bikes on ice more than I like to. I tend to try to just float across. If I want to stop I slowly pull in the clutch then hopefully have enough room to coast to a stop. Not a good situation no matter what. I dunno what it would be like on a bagger.
 

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I ride dirt bikes on ice more than I like to. I tend to try to just float across. If I want to stop I slowly pull in the clutch then hopefully have enough room to coast to a stop. Not a good situation no matter what. I dunno what it would be like on a bagger.
It's a real seat tester.
 
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