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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So here it is, 66 deg out in western NY. Get out if work early to take a ride on what might be the last warm day of the year. Get on the bike and I hear the dreaded clickity click click.

It's been maybe 3 weeks since I've been able to get out on it. It was a new MoCo battery in April.

Shouldn't it be able to last 3 weeks without a tender/charger? Security system wasn't on and I don't have any other power draw.

Besides feeling bummed out and thinking I was a dumbsh1t for not having the tender on it.... but it I'm thinking the battery should be able to hold a charge for a few weeks. What do you experts say?



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You may have something pulling current even when the bike is off. If you have a volt meter check to see if there's a drain on the battery. Disconnect the + wire's and put the meter in between the battery and the wires to complete the circuit. Put the + lead of the meter on the + terminal of the battery.
 

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Wayward Son
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A programmable clock\radio will cause a constant parasitic draw.
If most of your rides prior to the 3 week wait were of a fairly short duration then it is possible the battery never totally recharged from the load of starting it each time.
 

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Keep on Ridin’
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Terminals often vibrate loose at the least opportune time (not that there is any opportune time). I had to tighten mine so often that I woulnd up cracking one. My new battery has a different, much more solid terminal design.

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Harley Rider
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Terminals often vibrate loose at the least opportune time (not that there is any opportune time). I had to tighten mine so often that I woulnd up cracking one. My new battery has a different, much more solid terminal design.

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That's what came to mind here.
 

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Alberta Strong
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All fuel injected vehicles will draw on the battery at all times even when shut off. The computerized system is what's drawing on the battery. When Im not using my scooter it is always on the tender. My other toys I disconnect the battery or pull the main fuse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks guys
Checked the connections, tight as they should. No corrosion and until
this past month as I got out a few times a week so was never a concern always was a strong battery. The draw from the confuser might explain it. Tender on when riding gets less frequent makes a ton of sense, did it for past years just thought that the next day I would go riding. Let's hope that the polar vortex hype will hold off for another day so I can get a few more miles in. Usually ride till they use salt on the roads but it may be sooner than later.

Will pull off the pos and see if I see any current draw.


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I never put my 08 FLTR battery on a battery tender and I have had my bike sit for 3 months (while in the hospital) with the security on and the clock running and the bike will start right up.
I am not a big believer in battery tenders because I think it is good for the battery to drain and recharge on a regular basis.
You either have a bad battery or charging problem or a connection problem so checking the connection would be the place to start while you charge the battery then you can ride the bike and see if the battery voltage is the same after the ride if the battery voltage is low then you have a charging problem.
 

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Outlaw Nipple Poster
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The battery that came with my '14 Ultra crapped out in 4 months. Not all batteries are created equal. Warranty claimed it.

As to tenders, I've had a tender on all my scoots for over 15 years. Never had a problem.
 

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Wayward Son
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......I think it is good for the battery to drain and recharge on a regular basis.
There is a school of thought that says that.
With newer better battery technology I am no longer a believer in that particular thought process. Just my :2cents
 

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Call me Gig.
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There is a school of thought that says that.
With newer better battery technology I am no longer a believer in that particular thought process. Just my :2cents
But our bikes don't have "newer battery technology". They aren't that much different than the ones made 30 years ago.
 

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IMO, try charging your battery and see if it holds a charge. If not, buy a Big Crank from Battery Mart for $90 shipped. It's made by Deka, same as MoCo battery for half the price. I've had my Big Crank for 3 years and it still spins the motor over way better than OEM. Like I said....JMO.
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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Several months after I bought my present bike, the starter began lagging when the button was pushed before turning over the engine. Brought it in and the battery was toast. From what I was told by several people, there was a run of batteries that were defective and mine was one of them. Replaced under warranty, no questions asked. Not beyond the realm of possibility that there was another such bad run from the manufacturer.
 

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Glad to be anywhere
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The idea for deep drain and then fully recharge is more appropriate for the lithium (computer) batteries which used to develop a memory level and wouldn't recharge above that level and the marine (deep cycle) batts.

You may have bought a battery that had been sitting for awhile or one that was a little sick.

I can go a couple of weeks without charging. I'm afraid of letting it drain too low lest I create a weak cell.

These AGM batteries are good in that they do not need to be serviced (water or acid) and they can lay on their side without spilling acid.
 

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Keep on Ridin’
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But our bikes don't have "newer battery technology". They aren't that much different than the ones made 30 years ago.
I don't recall having access to Absorbent Glass Mat (AGM) batteries 30 years ago; or any other truly low maintenance battery that can be turned on its side without leaking acid, for that matter.

That's not to say that AGM batteries don't fail for other reasons. 12 volt batteries are still comprised of six 2-volt cells internally connected inside a sealed case. In that sense, they could be considered old tech. Such a battery can fail suddenly when one of those internal connections is compromised or broken. I encountered this many times in my years of dealings with auto maintenance and I would imagine that the amount of vibration produced by our Harleys could certainly be a factor in some of our frequent and premature battery failures.
 

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AGM batteries aren't that much different in that they are still Lead Acid batteries....

It's just that AGM batteries have a Glass Matt between the lead plates to Absorb the acid and retain it.... Hence the term "Absorbed Glass Matt", the underlying technology is the same however.
 

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Keep on Ridin’
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Agree. More of an improvement than a breakthrough. But a good improvement, nonetheless.

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Took it out and rode for close to an hour after 5hrs on a tender. Voltmeter was above 14 for the whole ride (about 50 mile ride). Left it on the tender since, but outside temp dropped 30 degrees.
Lot of good discussion, now to figure out what is the reason using all these discussion tips
Thanks again.


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Yep. The battery in my Street Bob went south on me as soon as the cooler weather hit. I replaced it with a 500cca battery, which turns the starter with a lot less strain. I figure this one will last longer.

Also, I find myself missing the old days when the lights had an on/off switch. It can't be good for the battery having to start the bike with all the lights on time after time.
 
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