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Discussion Starter #1
In conversation about winterizing a BMW motorcycle mechanic said that as long as you disconnect the negative there is no reason to worry about the battery during storage.

A friend who has stored his Porsche for winters for years says to take the battery out and put it in the basement on wood for the off season, never directly on cement.

As I indicated in the Battery Tender Jr. thread that device has done fine, except for the winter I didn't plug it in:banghead, but my curiosity is now peaked.

How do you store a battery through a long winter?
 

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I just leave it in the bike with the Battery Tender Jr plugged in.

Although based on truth (at least at one time), both the mechanic and your Porsche friend aren't 100% correct.

Depending on the type of battery and temperature, batteries have a natural self-discharge or internal electrochemical "leakage" at a 1% to 60% rate per month. Over time the battery will become sulfated and fully discharged which make it more susceptible to freezing. Higher temperatures will significantly accelerate this process. A battery stored at 95° F (35° C) will self-discharge twice as fast than one stored at 75° F (23.9° C). Leaving a battery in a vehicle can increase the discharge of battery due to the additional parasitic (ignition key-off load), unless the ground, normally negative, cable is disconnected from the battery. So, there is some truth to what the BMW mechanic said, but you should still keep the battery tender (not a trickle charger!) on the battery during extended storage.

All lead-acid batteries will naturally self-discharge which can result in loss of capacity from sulfation. The rate of self-discharge is most influenced by the temperature of the battery's electrolyte and the chemistry of the plates. This self-discharge is often mistaken for concrete floor causing the battery to drain.

In the early 1900s, when battery cases were made of porous materials such as tar-lined wood boxes, storing batteries on concrete floor would accelerate their natural self-discharge due to external leakage. Modern battery cases are made of polypropylene or hard rubber. These cases are sealed better, so external leakage-causing discharge is no longer a problem, provided the top of the battery is clean and free from wet or dried electrolyte and the same temperature as the floor. Yet the urban legend persists....

http://jgdarden.com/batteryfaq/carfaq14.htm
 

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......My Title......
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I keep mine on the battery tender and even in the winter we get some upper 40 degree days and as long as there is no snow on the ground I take the bike out for a short ride.
 

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On a ride
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Same here. Connect the battery tender keeping the battery in the bike. If you think it might be a couple of months maybe put some fuel stabilizer in the tank and run it through the system for a few minutes. This is all you need to do, and be sure to get out and enjoy a winter ride for those inevitable balmy days!
 

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COB
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I just leave it in the bike with the Battery Tender Jr plugged in.

Although based on truth (at least at one time), both the mechanic and your Porsche friend aren't 100% correct.

Depending on the type of battery and temperature, batteries have a natural self-discharge or internal electrochemical "leakage" at a 1% to 60% rate per month. Over time the battery will become sulfated and fully discharged which make it more susceptible to freezing. Higher temperatures will significantly accelerate this process. A battery stored at 95° F (35° C) will self-discharge twice as fast than one stored at 75° F (23.9° C). Leaving a battery in a vehicle can increase the discharge of battery due to the additional parasitic (ignition key-off load), unless the ground, normally negative, cable is disconnected from the battery. So, there is some truth to what the BMW mechanic said, but you should still keep the battery tender (not a trickle charger!) on the battery during extended storage.

All lead-acid batteries will naturally self-discharge which can result in loss of capacity from sulfation. The rate of self-discharge is most influenced by the temperature of the battery's electrolyte and the chemistry of the plates. This self-discharge is often mistaken for concrete floor causing the battery to drain.

In the early 1900s, when battery cases were made of porous materials such as tar-lined wood boxes, storing batteries on concrete floor would accelerate their natural self-discharge due to external leakage. Modern battery cases are made of polypropylene or hard rubber. These cases are sealed better, so external leakage-causing discharge is no longer a problem, provided the top of the battery is clean and free from wet or dried electrolyte and the same temperature as the floor. Yet the urban legend persists....

http://jgdarden.com/batteryfaq/carfaq14.htm
Yeah.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just leave it in the bike with the Battery Tender Jr plugged in.

Although based on truth (at least at one time), both the mechanic and your Porsche friend aren't 100% correct.

Depending on the type of battery and temperature, batteries have a natural self-discharge or internal electrochemical "leakage" at a 1% to 60% rate per month. Over time the battery will become sulfated and fully discharged which make it more susceptible to freezing. Higher temperatures will significantly accelerate this process. A battery stored at 95° F (35° C) will self-discharge twice as fast than one stored at 75° F (23.9° C). Leaving a battery in a vehicle can increase the discharge of battery due to the additional parasitic (ignition key-off load), unless the ground, normally negative, cable is disconnected from the battery. So, there is some truth to what the BMW mechanic said, but you should still keep the battery tender (not a trickle charger!) on the battery during extended storage.

All lead-acid batteries will naturally self-discharge which can result in loss of capacity from sulfation. The rate of self-discharge is most influenced by the temperature of the battery's electrolyte and the chemistry of the plates. This self-discharge is often mistaken for concrete floor causing the battery to drain.

In the early 1900s, when battery cases were made of porous materials such as tar-lined wood boxes, storing batteries on concrete floor would accelerate their natural self-discharge due to external leakage. Modern battery cases are made of polypropylene or hard rubber. These cases are sealed better, so external leakage-causing discharge is no longer a problem, provided the top of the battery is clean and free from wet or dried electrolyte and the same temperature as the floor. Yet the urban legend persists....

http://jgdarden.com/batteryfaq/carfaq14.htm
Kainam,
Thank you for the education!
 

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Just passing thru
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The best way is to move to Texas and ride all winter! :D
In Texas you have to worry about summer storage. I've been down there in your neck of the woods and I was impressed by the people places and things I saw. Very nice.
 

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Battery Tender Jr
 
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