Harley Davidson Forums banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,675 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The arrow in the background is where you are coming from headed to the arrow in the foreground.
Please share your thoughts on negotiating the path ahead.

Picture adapted from http://opi.mt.gov:8010/Driver's%20Education/Curriculum%20Modules/April%2005%20Mods%201-10/Mod%2010/M10%20Facts%20Curve%20Types.pdf
 

·
......My Title......
Joined
·
1,061 Posts
The arrow in the background is where you are coming from headed to the arrow in the foreground.
Please share your thoughts on negotiating the path ahead.
why am I on the wrong side of the road :( edit: after a second look I guess I would be on the correct side of the road :rofl:

on curvy roads or any road for that matter always just look into your turn. look at where you are wanting to go and then you'll get there :D
 

·
Just passing thru
Joined
·
6,636 Posts
Well there are mellow riders who will traverse this section without thinking about it and there are aggressive riders who will find the straightest path but the main thing to remember is not to get caught in the trap of keeping up with anyone. When you unnaturally force your abilities you can find yourself in trouble. Bottom line trust yourself and with practice you will find that you will naturally find your speed will start to increase around the twisties by itself.
 

·
......My Title......
Joined
·
1,061 Posts
Well there are mellow riders who will traverse this section without thinking about it and there are aggressive riders who will find the straightest path but the main thing to remember is not to get caught in the trap of keeping up with anyone. When you unnaturally force your abilities you can find yourself in trouble. Bottom line trust yourself and with practice you will find that you will naturally find your speed will start to increase around the twisties by itself.
Good point! My first accident on a motorcycle (on the street) happened because I had not been riding long and we were on a curvy road and I was trying to keep up with a friend that had a bike that did the twisties better than my bike and he had more experience in riding than I did. We went around a curve and my bike just wouldn't take it, it was leaned as far as it would go and slid out from under me. I wasn't hurt, a few scratches, but the bike slid in the ditch and bounced out of the ditch.

There has been a few times going to rally's that we've rode with begginers and we've always told them if we are going too fast and making them feel uncomfortable to just slow down and we'll get the hint, never try and keep up if you don't feel comfortable doing it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
187 Posts
The arrow in the background is where you are coming from headed to the arrow in the foreground.
Please share your thoughts on negotiating the path ahead.

Picture adapted from link
Well, I would be rolling into the first curve and half-way through roll the throttle hard to push through the curve and help stand the bike back up, let off the throttle roll into the right hander and repeat.
 

·
Official Ass Tweaker
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
First curve looks pretty even, but the second looks a little slower and has a camber dip in the middle. Visibility is clear. Looks as if there may be dust on the road.

So I would ride the first curve very late on the apex to put me close to the center line on the exit, which is where you want to be for the second curve.

I wouldn't try to get too close to the apex on the second curve, just let the throttle trail to lose a little pace and steady as she goes in the lane center. Too close to the edge and that camber dip will change your line slightly - not necessarily to your advantage :D

The rule on combinations like this is to ride the combination so that you get the last curve right.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,675 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
First curve looks pretty even, but the second looks a little slower and has a camber dip in the middle. Visibility is clear. Looks as if there may be dust on the road.

So I would ride the first curve very late on the apex to put me close to the center line on the exit, which is where you want to be for the second curve.

I wouldn't try to get too close to the apex on the second curve, just let the throttle trail to lose a little pace and steady as she goes in the lane center. Too close to the edge and that camber dip will change your line slightly - not necessarily to your advantage :D

The rule on combinations like this is to ride the combination so that you get the last curve right.
I've been wondering when you would share your wisdom :)
 

·
Official Ass Tweaker
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
I've been wondering when you would share your wisdom :)
Don't know about wisdom - it's just the chicken way through :D

I notice it comes from an online government course. Do they give the 'answer' ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,675 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Don't know about wisdom - it's just the chicken way through :D

I notice it comes from an online government course. Do they give the 'answer' ?
It is a fact sheet from a course for car drivers. I modified the picture and asked my question.
Here is what they had to say under the photo:
"If you're negotiating an unfamiliar curve, a good rule of thumb is to plan a late apex rather than an early one; this will
prevent you from "running out of road" at the end of the curve.

http://opi.mt.gov:8010/Driver's%20Education/Curriculum%20Modules/April%2005%20Mods%201-10/Mod%2010/M10%20Facts%20Curve%20Types.pdf
 

·
Official Ass Tweaker
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
Thanks, Lil.

The road's quite interesting in the other direction, too.

Little bit of right, then it goes about equal left and right round the bend and out of sight, so we don't know what's there till we get there, but further on than that when we can see it again it still looks a little twisty.

I think in the direction we're looking, I would be looking for a very moderate pace, given we can't see it all, and then ride a conservative line, basically a little bit either side of center lane, not pushing my luck any way.

On twisty roads, unless you are being seriously tailgated, it very seldom hurts to slow down, and most times helps.

I take it to extremes. As far as I am concerned, on this type of road, if you can't stop inside your clear road ahead, you are going too fast.

Of course, this is not necessarily compatible with actually getting from one place to another :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,675 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
No problem Pete.
You brought up the camber dip earlier, which is what caught my eye big time when first seeing the picture. Some say that motorcycles don't "feel" camber as much as cars, but racers work those changes so it seems rational that ordinary humans like me aught to pay at least some attention to it. It obviously plays into your thinking and approach. Do you find that it is something that ordinarily needs to be worked?
 

·
Official Ass Tweaker
Joined
·
1,804 Posts
The way I ride it doesn't make too much difference. But that's just because I ride the way I do :D

If you want to know how much difference camber makes, it's simple. Every degree of camber is about the same as another degree of lean.

That's why banked circuits work. The ultimate example being the 'Wall of Death', which is basically a cylinder.

I think you are asking whether I think about camber. You betcha :D

Although I don't calculate it at all.

The only thing that matters is the angle of the bike to the road.

The angle of the road to the planet doesn't make any difference.

Just set the bike right to the road, and the road's angle to the planet will take care of itself.

So - if there is positive camber on the road (road leans in the same direction you are turning) you need to steer less, and if there is negative camber on the road you need to steer more - and if you are smart you will slow down too :D
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top