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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Babies on a motorcycle? Have yet to see that in this country.


S.C. Bill AIMS TO Require Child Safety Seats And Belts On Motorcycles

A bill that would require babies and small children to be secured to a motorcycle with seat belts is under consideration by South Carolina lawmakers.

S.C. state Rep. Joseph Daning (R-Berkely Co.) filed legislation (H. 3040) that would require a standard, rear-facing child safety seat to be used for motorcycle passengers from birth up to 1 year of age, and for a belt-positioning booster seat with both lap and shoulder belts for children younger than 7 and weighing 40-80 pounds. “We take care of our children in cars, but they’re so unprotected on the back of motorcycles” said Daning, who added that the bill was prompted by constituents who feared an ex-spouse would ride their children on a motorcycle.

Rep. Bill Taylor called Daning’s proposal “government overreach” and said motorcyclists are a safety-conscious community, but child-safety advocates support Daning’s efforts. Only a handful of states impose a minimum age for riders, and South Carolina is not one of them according to the Children’s Trust of South Carolina, pointing out that 25 children required emergency medical attention due to motorcycle injuries in the state from 2007 through 2009.

ABATE of SC state coordinator, Ralph Bell, emphasized that there have been no fatalities of passengers under 7, and said changing the law would hinder charity events. Dennis Welborn, the state legislative coordinator for ABATE told the Morris News Service that “Its passage would cause much more harm than good," and in particular, mounting a child safety seat on a motorcycle would change its center of gravity, making it unwieldy, affecting its handling and braking abilities.
 

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A bill to protect children "from birth up to 1 year" shouldn't be necessary cause no child that age should be on a bike. For children up to age 7? Well, we don't have children so I don't know for sure, but if we did have kids I can't say I wouldn't take my 6 or 7 year old son for a trip around the block but if I did it would only be an occasional thing to do after he begged and pleaded enough.

If those people want to make kids safer they should concentrate on teaching their parents how to drive their cars more safely and more considerately of others who may also have kids in their cars. Oh, and teach them how dangerous it is to their kids in their vehicles when they get on a cell phone while underway.

Do lawmakers get paid on the number of laws they create? And is there a bonus for maybe the dumbest law that gets created?
 

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One person complains and he pushes for a law when only a small amount of injuries have happened and no fatalities. Go figure
 

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My brother lives in a small town of maybe 100 to 150 population and he has and does take his kids for rides around that town and at fairly young age. He puts them right in front of him and putts around.
Having said that I've seen people ride young kids like three to six years old in city and heavy traffic and riding like a idiot on top of it and I do not dig that at all. :pull
 

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I dunno. I, personally, don't take small children on my scoot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I would put my son on seat in front of me at age 2+. He automatically leaned forward and put grip on the tank. We would putt around in front of the house on base housing for a few minuets. Ride back up drive way and set him down, he would take off into house get his mom. Of course the Air Cops would show up giving me the evil eye. They never caught us outlaws in the act .....
 

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I've had, in the past, taken kids on very short rides in front of me. One was a little lost guy in Norfolk, VA, way back in the 70's. Found his house about two blocks away and he ran home as soon as I let him down.

I take my 5yo granddaughter on short rides (with a helmet) around the block. 7yo won't go yet. I don't find kids get much out of riding until they get around 12 to 14. WA state puts an age limit on riding. 5yo is youngest allowed.
 

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I've ridden my Grandkids around the neighborhood, but I'm the type the of guy who doesn't need the .gov to tell me how to do it safely.

Congress is judged on the number of new laws they create. When they don't create new laws they are considered ineffective. We're nearing a time where we will need very few new laws.
 

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Why would you belt a 50 lb child to a 900 lb motorcycle when you wouldn't do it to the adult rider ? I don't mean to launch into a circular "what if" set of arguments but jeeze Louise, you can see how belts could be disastrous without the protection of a cage no ?
 

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Child safetey seat?

Something like this?:

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Must be set up picture ^^^^^^^^
 

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I would say it's rather a physical than age issue. IMHO, any passenger must be able to sit and reach the pegs per bike design. I would guess that focuses on most +12 years kids.
Having a child seat attached to a bike is just stupid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Update from Texas on new law.

NEW TEXAS LAW PROBLEMS--A new law entitled “Malorie’s Law” went into effect on January 1 in Texas which is causing serious confusion for thousands of motorcyclists across the state. A wide range of professionals from the motorcycling industry in the state were contacted to find out how the law would affect them and every single contact expressed concern about the woefully lacking details.

Malorie’s Law was introduced by Texas State Representative Larry Phillips (R) of Sherman, Texas to address the loss of 19-year-old Malorie Bullock who was the passenger on a motorcycle in a one-vehicle wreck that took her life; her boyfriend was driving the motorcycle.

The new law states the following:

MOTORCYCLE FOOTRESTS AND HANDHOLDS REQUIRED. A motorcycle that is designed to carry more than one person must be equipped with footrests and handholds for use by the passenger.


“We have been flooded with phone calls,” says Gene Slater, GM of Rick Fairless’ Strokers Dallas. “I’ve spent at least half a day re-reading the law and doing research to try to find answers and I am shocked at how vague this law is. We have received no advance notification from any agency that this was going into effect and the criteria so that we could plan accordingly.”

Many industry professionals expressed dismay that Malorie’s Law passed to start with and went into effect with seemingly no advice from the Texas motorcycling community. This speaks volumes about how much the state riders need to band together to ensure their rights and avoid situations like Malorie’s Law.

For motorcyclists – and dealerships/shops – just some of questions include:
· What, exactly, defines a handhold?

· Even though a motorcycle may be manufactured to hold two people, if the bike owner has it outfitted with a seat designed for only one person, will handholds still be required?

· What year model bikes does this take effect with and/or does it affect vintage or custom motorcycles?

· How does this law affect riders from other states simply traveling to / through Texas?

Upon initial contact with the Texas Department of Public Safety, a spokesperson stated that the new law would “not be interpreted by just one agency; each agency may interpret it differently.”

Follow up contact was made with both the DPS office and Rep. Larry Phillips for clarification with 10 initial questions. At the time of this writing, there has been no reply from Rep Phillips office and DPS has forwarded on the questions to their “subject matter experts” yet are vague when it comes to confirming whether their experts will reply with the requested answers in order to meet media deadlines.

Punishment for not abiding by Malorie’s Law is considered a Class C Misdemeanor and punishable by a fine up to $500.
 

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The youngest kid that I ever saw on a motorcycle was around four or five. He was on a Goldwing and about as well protected as a kid could be on a motorcycle, perched in a seat with armrests and a full size support for his back. The only way that he could fall off that bike would be to climb over his dad.

I will admit that I cringe when I see a child on a motorcycle. However I don't support any legislation that would restrict children from riding on motorcycles. My philosophy is that adults know or should know how dangerous a motorcycle can be. They freely make that choice to ride. Kids have neither the appreciation of the risk or the choice.

I would like to think that parents would wait until the child is at least an adolescent before letting them get on a motorcycle.

Pete
 

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ive riddin many kids on my scoot. if they can grab hold an hang on ill give them a round the block ride. no speeding or stupid shit just a nice slow ride. ive never had a problem with kids. they love it. them smiles on there faces is just awwwwsome. fugggg the gooberment . happy kids now thats living . hell man when i was in my thirties i had some old 3 wheelers out back my kin would come over an want to ride . i told them they dont have brakes they said so. i said go. never seen a bunch more happy. of coarse there parents were not happy , but they had a blast. i dont see a problem for short slow round the neighbor hood scoots. down the hwy or roads with traffic ,,, thats dif
 

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Update from Texas on new law.



NEW TEXAS LAW PROBLEMS--A new law entitled “Malorie’s Law” went into effect on January 1 in Texas which is causing serious confusion for thousands of motorcyclists across the state. A wide range of professionals from the motorcycling industry in the state were contacted to find out how the law would affect them and every single contact expressed concern about the woefully lacking details.



Malorie’s Law was introduced by Texas State Representative Larry Phillips (R) of Sherman, Texas to address the loss of 19-year-old Malorie Bullock who was the passenger on a motorcycle in a one-vehicle wreck that took her life; her boyfriend was driving the motorcycle.



The new law states the following:



MOTORCYCLE FOOTRESTS AND HANDHOLDS REQUIRED. A motorcycle that is designed to carry more than one person must be equipped with footrests and handholds for use by the passenger.





“We have been flooded with phone calls,” says Gene Slater, GM of Rick Fairless’ Strokers Dallas. “I’ve spent at least half a day re-reading the law and doing research to try to find answers and I am shocked at how vague this law is. We have received no advance notification from any agency that this was going into effect and the criteria so that we could plan accordingly.”



Many industry professionals expressed dismay that Malorie’s Law passed to start with and went into effect with seemingly no advice from the Texas motorcycling community. This speaks volumes about how much the state riders need to band together to ensure their rights and avoid situations like Malorie’s Law.



For motorcyclists – and dealerships/shops – just some of questions include:

· What, exactly, defines a handhold?



· Even though a motorcycle may be manufactured to hold two people, if the bike owner has it outfitted with a seat designed for only one person, will handholds still be required?



· What year model bikes does this take effect with and/or does it affect vintage or custom motorcycles?



· How does this law affect riders from other states simply traveling to / through Texas?



Upon initial contact with the Texas Department of Public Safety, a spokesperson stated that the new law would “not be interpreted by just one agency; each agency may interpret it differently.”



Follow up contact was made with both the DPS office and Rep. Larry Phillips for clarification with 10 initial questions. At the time of this writing, there has been no reply from Rep Phillips office and DPS has forwarded on the questions to their “subject matter experts” yet are vague when it comes to confirming whether their experts will reply with the requested answers in order to meet media deadlines.



Punishment for not abiding by Malorie’s Law is considered a Class C Misdemeanor and punishable by a fine up to $500.

I think you meant to post this in the handhold thread. In any case, I'm avoiding Texas until they sort this out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I think you meant to post this in the handhold thread. In any case, I'm avoiding Texas until they sort this out.
Yes your right, dang it...
 
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