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If you ride deserted 2 lane roads with the usual broken white line in the middle, try zig-zagging the front wheel so every other line is on the other side, at least of the front wheel, and then keep it up as you accelerate.

I've never done this on a dresser, but on the LowRider and the V-Rod, I could keep the zig-zag going to a pretty good speed, but it sure becomes an obvious effort, and a lot of work, see-sawing the handle bars to THROW the bike down and STAND it back up to THROW it down on the opposite side, in rapid repetition.

I considered this part of self-training to resist target fixation, along with playing dodge the tarstrip.

Wrong thread, but another "obvious" but counter-intuitive truism to start arguments with people who are certain they are right and you are nuts,

when changing to a new magazine in a 1911, and releasing the slide-lock to chamber the first round, best practice, you should have the trigger pulled back hard.

:think

...
One of my favorite ways to stay sharp

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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One of my favorite ways to stay sharp
Don't you find that as you go faster, the ability to sidestep the line with accuracy isn't what becomes a lot more difficult,

it seems obvious to me anyway, what becomes more difficult is throwing 640 lbs. 2 ft. side to side faster and faster. :whoa

Anyone who was under the illusion that they are controlling the bike significantly by leaning, shifting their own weight,

considering the mass of the bike and how fast it can be thrown side to side. Not with your weight you don't..

:ride

..
 

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I find that it's the gyroscopic affect. The faster the bike is going the harder it tries to stay upright. Which is a good thing unless you are trying to dodge dips hits on cell phones.

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I do feel that it makes me a better rider.

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Way easier on the Sportster I have been riding since 1986

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Been riding since 1970 and was an instructor with the Alberta Safety Council and taught a basic motorcycle course. One exercise we did was set up a T and the instructor stands at the top of the T the student rides towards the instructor then the instructor gives either a left or right turn signal. When the student counter steers you can see the front wheel step out then set up the lean angle. As the student builds confidence the speed is increased and the time of the turn signal is delayed.

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All Motorcycle training courses in my view should include Counter Steering
in their courses, and never talk about how you can save your
life on the highway without in the inclusion of the concept.

Firstly imv, a bicycle is a horrible example for explaining the
concept of counter steering. A bicycle, similar to a motorcycle,
is best thought of as a tricycle below 10mph, twist the bars
counter clockwise you move left, twist the bars clockwise ,
you're bike moves, veers, or turns to the right.

Get a bicycle or Motorbike above approx 12-20mph , and
the dynamics transition out of tricycle steering into
counter steering.

I was first introduced to counter steering in 2002, but the people
that were using it misunderstood the concept, they understood
counter steering to be a method of pushing down on the right
bar to head right and push down on the left bar to turn left or
initiate those turns or directions. That concept only partially
worked as I think when you push down on the right bar it tends
to very slightly move forward, but only slightly, which slightly aids
in the initiation of the turn, coupled with lean.. So this was wrong
but it was just how they had interpreted it.

Later on, through moto gp videos and how too's I learned the real
method, push forward slightly on left bar at speeds about 12-20+ mph
and you will head left, push forward on the right bar, you will head
to the right.
In moto gp, at high speeds (100-170+) or in slower tight turns, a
rider will push forward on right bar to head right and sometimes
actually pull on the left bar at the same time as needed.

Flat track racing is a matter of drifting , counter steering is essential ,
even as mentioned with cars, and trucks, if you are in a drift
or on slippery snow, counter steering is also essential.

Back to training courses;
If this concept is not taught, a rider can get killed in a turn that
he entered slightly too quickly or one that has a radius that tightens
up later in the turn, if he does not have counter steering down
to near expert level, he may quite easily drift over the center
stripes into oncoming traffic or off into soft shoulders or
embankments etc.
Sadly, most of the accounts of these
accidents are attributed to everything under the sun, but not to
the (likely) real cause; lack of proper training and not understanding
counter steering fully, or at all.
There is so much to learn in a training course, but without this concept
being hammered home in that course, a rider has a false sense of security,
and when he gets into a life/death situation he will often input to the handle
bars the opposite that he should and instantly guarantee failure.
 

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Obviously didn't take the course...BS!
 

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1997 FLSTC Soft Tail Heritage Deluxe
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Advanced riding course ..... try riding toward a box and giving the left or right grip a "HIT" with your hand, the bike'll "jump left or right, depending on which grip you hit, around the box and you keep travelling in a straight line. Not something you want to do if you have bad nerves or a heart condition though :)
 
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