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Discussion Starter #1
I have searched the threads, and have watched nearly every video i could find on changing fork fluid on a HD. So if i may ask: Is there any way to drain the forks on a post 2014 Ultra. With out removing the forks from the triple tree? Since the MoCo decided to NOT install a drain screw in the lower leg? I just want to change the fork oil as there are no oil leaks from the seals, thus I see no reason to rebuild the forks.
 

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Recommended fork oil change interval is 50k miles. Then remove each fork from the triple clamps, turn upside down and pump.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Recommended fork oil change interval is 50k miles. Then remove each fork from the triple clamps, turn upside down and pump.
So then my guess is this is the MoCo's way to say:
Well your got the front end torn apart for ten bucks worth of oil. So ya just as well: Repack the stem and wheel bearings, replace the tire, wile yer' at it? Oh, bleed the brakes while your in the area.:cussing

Then next summer tear it all down again; Because the oil seals give up six or nine months later.:what?
It makes one wonder: What amount MoCo paid Showa to remove the drain from the casting?
That idea certainly slows ones willingness to experiment with oil weights for tuning.

If removing the forks to drain, is the only way. Well then, I will wait until i'm ready to change the front tire (coming soon). Then just do a complete front end service at once.

I prefer to do the maintenance in bits n' pieces vs big chunks. As bit by bit, keeps the tool box and eyes open for a closer inspection, more often and even though is really the same money spent, bit by bit "feels" easier on the wallet. :nerd
JMO
 
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Dude, it ain't that bigga deal ! Ya only do it every 50k miles or so. The 1st fork oil change is the biggy cause the break in oil is still in the forks. By 50k the fork seals should get replaced so do it all at once, no biggy ! The bushings should still be good but maybe replace them too since everything is apart already anyways.
If you're doing it for the 1st time it might seem tough IMO.
By the way, don't mess with the fork neck bearings unless you have the tools for the job and know how to do them. They don't get serviced with the fork oil change.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Schmidty, "Not that big a deal" My last HD was a 1980 FXRS, on that bike it was a simple as: remove a screw, loosen the cap, go get a ice tea. pump the front end a few times, replace screw. remove cap, add oil, replace cap. Now rinse and repeat for the other side. Done.. That was in 1980. Now just "because" I have to take the front end off a Ultra just to "try" a different weight oil...Not that big a deal. My ARSE!
 
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!/2 Ton, It ain't a cake walk doing the front forks on any Ultra ! Fairing comes off as does the fender, tire gets removed, front panel comes off, radio gets removed etc., etc..
There's an old saying, 'if it ain't broke then don't fix it'.
Also I wouldn't go any heavier than 20W fork oil.
 

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My last HD was a 1980 FXRS, ....
Wow! We'll need pics since the FXR didn't show up until 1982....

I had a 1980 FXE. Loved that bike but like my 1990 FXRS even more.

Sent from here to there.
 
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Probably a dumb question, and I'm sure I'm gonna get one of those "slap the other guy in the head" emoji's for this, but if all you want to do is either refresh or change the weight of the fork fluid, why can't you just go in from the top and suck out as much of the old fluid with a piece of polyflow tubing and replace with new? Even if you only get 90% of it out, you'll still get a huge benefit from it. We don't get all of our motor oil out of our engine when we do our motor oil change and don't think twice about it. If it really bugs you, swap it out again after a few hundred miles and it'll be almost pure. :think:dunno
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Wow! We'll need pics since the FXR didn't show up until 1982....

I had a 1980 FXE. Loved that bike but like my 1990 FXRS even more.

Sent from here to there.
Damn beer! your 100% Alan, My bike was 1980 FX 80, chain drive. It had that stupid peanut AMF single tank. No way to put the 5 gallon tanks on with welding the mounts to the frame. Mine was the Narrow Glide. More of a cross-breed between a Sportster and a FL. Before the Low-Rider, (Witch was my dream bike). Mine was not the "xrs"! My sincere apology to all! I definitely don't have any digital pics of it. When I run across one of the film prints, I will scan it at post..

I bought it used, It had been reverted back to points. It had the solid motor mounts and vibrated like crazy. The mirrors were for "legit only" as everything was just a circle in the mirror. My wife absolutely hated that bike. She rode on the king-queen back seat one time only and DONE. I remember paying $5 k for the bike and another $5 k, to have the engine re-built and balanced, I had Branch flow the heads and install sodium filled valves. So i could run unleaded. After all that, I found the source of the extreme vibration: A broken rear motor mount!

Yet there was no way to talk the wife into riding it even around the block! I sold it on consignment at the Fordice H.D after owing it for just one summer.. Sale price, you guessed it $5k. Someone got a deal!

So she convinced me to part ways with it for a Yamaha Venture Royal. That one got at least a few weekend runs with the Mrs on the back. She has well made up for it though. For my b-day last year she bought me my Ultra! She has yet to ride on it. I guess she doesn't like my driving?
 
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Discussion Starter #10
!/2 Ton, It ain't a cake walk doing the front forks on any Ultra ! Fairing comes off as does the fender, tire gets removed, front panel comes off, radio gets removed etc., etc..
There's an old saying, 'if it ain't broke then don't fix it'.
Also I wouldn't go any heavier than 20W fork oil.
My apologies for seeming so condescending. I had, had a few prior to punching the key board! I understand that you are here helping me. I owe ya one!

It just seems like a LOT of B.S. imo to go through due to a simple screw. I just want to play with the front end to lessen the dive when coming to a stop. Yet trying to keep the feel of the "Couch" on the rain grooves and cement seams.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Probably a dumb question, and I'm sure I'm gonna get one of those "slap the other guy in the head" emoji's for this, but if all you want to do is either refresh or change the weight of the fork fluid, why can't you just go in from the top and suck out as much of the old fluid with a piece of polyflow tubing and replace with new? Even if you only get 90% of it out, you'll still get a hug benefit from it. We don't get all of our motor oil out of our engine when we do our motor oil change and don't think twice about it. If it really bugs you, swap it out again after a few hundred miles and it'll be almost pure. :think:dunno
Now that just plain makes too much sense! THANK YOU !!
 
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She has yet to ride on it. I guess she doesn't like my driving?
Weird. My wife says she doesn't like the way I drive 4 wheels, much less 2.

Sent from here to there.
 
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, I had Branch flow the heads and install sodium filled valves. So i could run unleaded.
????????

Once you have the fork legs off, you could drill and tap the bottoms. That way all future oil changes could be done by draining through them.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
JLR IDK if they still exist but, Branch was the "GO TO company" for any type of Head work back then.. Probably as well known as "Eddelbrock Cams and Hi-rise Intakes" or perhaps "Hooker Headers".(In the Hot Rod & Racing world). Am I showing my age? The 1980 and earlier bikes were designed to run on Leaded Premium. When Non-Leaded fuel took over, we had to put a lead fuel additive in the gas or, the engine would rattle like it was full of marbles or something. Running Unleaded fuel in a Leaded engine was a good way to "inhale a valve" destroying the engine! The Lead in fuel was to soften the blow between the Valves and Seats of solid metal valves. Sodium filled valves took over with the Unleaded fuels. I am not 100% on how or why this worked but, installing these valves converted a "Leaded" engine to "Unleaded" it worked! The term "Flowing the heads" meant removing the bumps and seams tailings from the rough cast head and matching the air flow in each head to the other. In other words it matched the intake and exhaust flow of both front and rear cylinder heads. Many Pro race bikes would have the entire intake and exhaust channels polished to maximize the amount of air flow. This was a controversial topic to say the least. As polishing meant more tear downs to keep the carbon buildup from flaking off into the intake.. Mine was not polished, to facilitate better "turbulence" in the intake.. Hence the controversy of the day. Foundry work has come a long way since then. All that, to help the engine run cooler, smoother and balanced.

I'm sure you get what i'm sayin' You had a '77 Bonneville!
 

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!/2 ton,

I am familiar with Jerry Branch's head work. However, sodium filled valves were used to dissipate heat. Maybe Branch thought that cooler valves would alleviate a problem that didn't exist. The only engines that had problems when lead was removed were low rpm engines under heavy load - like tractors plowing fields. The no lead scare turned out to be like Y2K. :) In fact engines were better off with out the corrosive effect of tetraethyl lead.
Case in point were the soft cast valve seats in the older Triumph's (among many others). They were supposed to be destroyed with out lead. It never happened. Even my old '48 Plymouth 6 ran trouble free on unleaded gas.

just sayin'
 

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Discussion Starter #16
!/2 ton,

I am familiar with Jerry Branch's head work. However, sodium filled valves were used to dissipate heat. Maybe Branch thought that cooler valves would alleviate a problem that didn't exist. The only engines that had problems when lead was removed were low rpm engines under heavy load - like tractors plowing fields. The no lead scare turned out to be like Y2K. :) In fact engines were better off with out the corrosive effect of tetraethyl lead.
Case in point were the soft cast valve seats in the older Triumph's (among many others). They were supposed to be destroyed with out lead. It never happened. Even my old '48 Plymouth 6 ran trouble free on unleaded gas.

just sayin'
Well then i guess i suckered me into that one.. Live n' Learn. :eek-surprise However as i recall, Branch didn't recommend the sodium valves, In all honesty, i asked for them. I guess i was just suckered into the idea..
 

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to convert the old engines to run on unleaded fuel one thing only needed to be done the exhaust seats need to be replaced with hard seats. in the first few years after the change to unleaded fuel we changed thousands of exhaust seats to hard seats. of course while you were there you did a valve job on intakes also. you could run the old cast seats with unleaded fuel but would not get anywhere near the normal life between valve jobs. we recomended running the old seats until they failed, then replace with hard seats and do a valve job. we installed a gazillion hard seats in our automotive machine shop for the first few years after the change to unleaded gas.
 

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The Rushmores are pretty easy to do. Remove the accessory switch cover under the ignition switch. You don't have to remove the switch either, turn the wheel to full lock one way or the other and you can slide it out. Assuming you removed the tire and fender already, loosen the pinch bolts that hold the fork leg in place. slide the fork leg down until the top of the leg ( where the for cap nut is) reaches the the bottom pinch bolt and stop there. tighten that pinch bolt up again. Now grab a wrench and break the fork leg cap nut loose only. Don"t try and remove it, just crack it free. This saves you from trying to break it free in a vise or what have you. Now loosen the pinch bolt and slide the leg out. Hold on to it, they sometimes slide right out.
 

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Now I'm curious, what does removing the accessory switch cover accomplish ?
Duh ... pinch bolts !
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I just want to let 'yall know that i have not yet begun to dive into this yet. I really dis-like it when OP's don't report back to the forum, when they resolve an issue. I promise to report my findings, and finish up this thread.
 
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