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Addicted Since 2010
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Discussion Starter #1
So....
Last year, around this time (ironically) I posted about this issue. That time it eventually went away on its own.

Well...
It's Back!!

Here is the deal. While doing some electrical work on the bike fixing the connections for me LED effect lighting, I put it all back together and the headlight problem came back. I know that it is not because of the LED's, as they were not on the bike when it happened the first time. That being said, I was jostling the wires under the tank that have connections and stuff. I wonder if there is a bad connection for the high beam under the tank.

I don't know...been up since 5:40, worked all day, weed eated 400 foot of overgrown ditch, fixed the LED's quickly cleaned the bike and now here I sit. I am so tired I don't even know if this post makes sense!

Any ideas?
 

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You pretty much answered your own question. Almost certainly a bad connection, most likely under the seat.
 

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Addicted Since 2010
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Discussion Starter #3
OK more awake now!! Like I said I could barely type then....

OK here it goes.

All I got done last night is checked continuity from the first plug (38b) to the headlight wires in the headlight. All those connections were good. I am going to work down the like until I find a problem. I have to find in the service manual though where the schematic is that shows connector 38b and how it connects to the main wiring harness.

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While running down the line, pull apart every single plug. If there is no electrical grease in the connection, scuff up the metal with a small file. Even a card board nail file cut to size would work. Be sure to check inside the switch as well. Had a similar problem on the brake lever on a '91 Kawi Vulcan. Just needed to scuff up the metal on one connection, problem fixed.
 

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Well wiring schematic would certainly help.

Mechanics working on a particular bike with a particular problem sometimes see trends and might bypass a step if they've seen something before however, simple troubleshooting techniques would imply you start where you have power and follow it connection by connection until you don't.

One place I've had trouble in the past where headlights were concerned is dirt and corrosion on the fuses at the fuse box.
 
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