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Discussion Starter #1
I recently changed the battery in my 2005 Dyna super glide custom. I started the bike and rode it for about two hours, the next few days it sat. When I tried to start it today it was dead. I put on the charger and recharged the battery. I turned the key and the lights and display came on and I could hear the fuel pump run, but when I hit the starter it was dead.....absolutely nothing. Then I turned the key off and noticed the speedometer was jumping and moving on its on with everything off. The only way to get it to stop is to disconnect the battery. How do I fix this? We don't get a lot of nice days to ride in Colorado during February so I would like to get it fixed ASAP. Thanks for any help!
 

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Kicking Rocks...
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Have you checked for codes?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Now the speedometer will not light up so I cant check codes and everything on the right handlebar is dead kill switch and starter are dead.
 

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Asylum Inmate
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Remove and clean the grounds.

The engine grounds. The ground wire to the frame from the voltage regulator.

Do not just look at them. UN bolt the bolt. Clean the location real well and re torque the on.

The take a look at the terminals on the battery. Assuming the new battery is ok.... You need to look at those connections.

While in the battery drop a hydrometer into each cell and take a look at the specific gravity of each cell. A bad cell will show up as an odd low reading compared to the rest of the cells. That would indicate a bad new battery. It happens.

Trickle charge to full charge.

Ride it.... Been 65 F here in Grand Jct.

When you get back after it is shut down take a good volt meter and measure the battery voltage. Should be above 12.38 volts minimum.
 

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09 Dyna Super Glide
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If by 'changed the battery,' you mean that you put in a new battery, then the battery is, or at least was, probably good. [The failure rate of new batteries is low.]

The first thing that I would do would be to get a meter and check the voltage of the battery. Anything below 12.6 or 12.7 volts means that the battery is not fully charged. Below 12 volts means that the battery has only 25% capacity left. Below 11.9 volts, it is fully discharged.

If the battery is 12.6 volts or higher and the bike won't start, then the problem is probably not the battery, voltage regulator or the alternator.

If the battery is discharged to the point where the bike will not start, then you could have a bad voltage regulator or alternator. You could also have a parasitic drain on the battery that is discharging it while the bike is not running.

The next thing to do is to fully charge the battery. Then start up the bike hook the battery terminals to a DC volt meter and check the voltage at idle, 1.5k rpm's and 2k rpm's. [Some bikes do not generate sufficient current to charge the battery at idle.] A healthy charge rate with the bike running should be between 13.4 and 14 volts. If you are getting a good charge rate, then your alternator and voltage regulator are working well.

With the bike running, after verifying that it is charging at specs, then check to see if the speedo is acting up. A lot of electronic devices can do all sorts of strange things if they are not getting sufficient power.

If everything checks out this far, then I would turn off the bike, pull the master fuse, and disconnect, clean and reassemble all of the ground connections - frame and major components. Clean them with contact cleaner and a wire brush. Then coat them in something like DeOxit D100 or preferably, DeOxit Shield. While you are at it, check all of the fuses and fuse block for anything that looks like oxidation. If you find any, clean the fuse sockets with contact cleaner, then apply a DeOxit product to them and the fuses before you reinstall them.

I would then take the battery out and have it load tested. [I think that some auto parts stores will do this for free.] If the battery is bad, then replace it. If it is good, charge it up and list it sit for a few days, not connected to the bike, and then check the voltage again. If the voltage is stable, then you might have a parasitic drain somewhere on the bike.

Reinstall the battery and perform a test for parasitic drain. All you have to do is to disconnect the positive terminal and insert a DC meter that is capable to measuring low DC currents - usually milliamps. [Some meters that do not specifically have milliamp capabilities still have enough resolution to detect a parasitic drain, though possibly not accurately. Other meters, such as the Fluke 116 or 87-V have designated milliamp settings that can tell you exactly how much drain your battery is experiencing.]

Motorcycles with alarm systems and some radios do experience a very small amount of parasitic drain when they are not running. These devices, unless they are malfunctioning, generally do not cause any problems for your battery. Sometimes riders add accessories that can create more significant current demands. Make sure that you don't have any accessories that are left on when the bike it turned off.

Voltage regulators use electrical components, like diodes, that can fail and cause a parasitic voltage drain. You can test this by disconnecting the voltage regulator and then performing a parasitic current test.

Good luck.

Pete



I recently changed the battery in my 2005 Dyna super glide custom. I started the bike and rode it for about two hours, the next few days it sat. When I tried to start it today it was dead. I put on the charger and recharged the battery. I turned the key and the lights and display came on and I could hear the fuel pump run, but when I hit the starter it was dead.....absolutely nothing. Then I turned the key off and noticed the speedometer was jumping and moving on its on with everything off. The only way to get it to stop is to disconnect the battery. How do I fix this? We don't get a lot of nice days to ride in Colorado during February so I would like to get it fixed ASAP. Thanks for any help!
 

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Retired citizen
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23,374 Posts
A trickle charger won't recharge a fully discharged battery. Try using an automotive battery charger. Set the charger to full rate and charge for 2 hours only. The charger needle should go to the high side then slowly go lower until the battery is fully charged. When the needle bobbles at the 1 amp or lower range the battery is charged.
Next test the charging system. There's a reason the new battery discharged.
 

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Retired citizen
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I forgot to mention for you to check the wire harness that crosses over the top of the trans housing. They can rub thru where they lay across the trans. Can cause weird issues to crop up with the gauges.
 
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