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Asylum Inmate
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am little more than a month out before I start the Road Captain first aid training program. These first two are basic CPR, Blood Borne Pathogens, and First Aid. Like to inventory the Kit I carry before starting the program.

This course is a prerequisite before we do the Wilderness First Responder Training in June. That training is three days and fairly intense compared to this training, but well worth it if you ride a lot in remote areas IMO.

So this is my base kit:



I don't bother to pull out the sutures, bandaids, and tapes because once opened they are no longer sterile so just a simple expiration date check is all they go through.



I like to make sure my micro shields are in good condition. I have to replace them about every 6 years.

I test the blood pressure cup and the stethoscope to make sure it has not got damaged from riding along on the bike all spring, summer, and fall.

Look over my Sam Splints both finger splints and arm leg splint are in proper order. Make sure the evacuation bulb is still sealed and flexible. About every 10 years I replace it.



Super bright LED flashlight, Scissors and a tweezers are in the kit. I have hemostats as well, but they are the suture combo unit in sterile packaging so I keep the scissors so I don't have to violate the sterile seal for a simple bandage dressing.



I like a wide variety of tapes, gauzes, and square bandages in the kit as well. Let me deal with a lot of crap cheap.



Sterile solutions, cold packs, and non-sticking bandages are a must. I noticed both my 6 inch and 4 inch Israeli Bandages have gone out of date. Those are on order from Amazon and should be here in a week.



I get a lot of crap for carrying this from the guys, but I have had to use it four times in my life, two times where full air medical evacuation was required, where I was not riding with the wreck I rode up on.... I mean to tell you people are extremely happy when you know what you are doing to help the person laying there bleeding out of their ears or eyes, with an arm or leg folded the wrong way.

Though you don't get your stuff replaced.... you have to just be happy with the fact you helped. Though my local EMTs take care of my kit if I am taking the courses with them instead of teaching it.

If you do not have at the very least Red Cross first aid and CPR training consider finding a place to take it this winter. You will be very happy you have the knowledge if you ever come upon a wreck and no one knows what to do.... just clearing the airway can be the difference between someone surviving and dying.

I will do a follow on thread in the spring when I do the Road Captain First Responder class. I put it together in 1978 and have been doing it ever since, but it has gotten a lot better since I became a wilderness first responder certified 16 years ago.

If any of you are in the Southwest Wyoming, Western Colorado, eastern Utah, North New Mexico, North Arizona areas and want to have the class training schedule please PM you email address and I will get you on the list. First Aid, CPR and Blood Borne Pathogen is fairly cheap. The spring class on First Response is $350.00 just so you know and it will take three days two of which are responding to accidents we have set up on the side of the road for you to roll onto and practice. (We now let 911 know what we are doing.... don't ask why!!!)
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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24,839 Posts
BB, looks exactly like ONE of my bags. Have 2 in the car, but that is one I carry on the road on short trips. Once a medic, always a medic.
 

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Asylum Inmate
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12,219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
BB, looks exactly like ONE of my bags. Have 2 in the car, but that is one I carry on the road on short trips. Once a medic, always a medic.
I forgot you were a medic. I also now carry an AED. Have not had to use it yet. But I have rolled up on 4 wrecks that I had to use the med kit for, two were real bad.

I got into the Wilderness First Responder thing because of my wilderness hunting on horses about 20 years ago. I now take it every three years.

First year I adapted that training into an advance Road Captain course I had borrowed some wrecked bikes from our local bike salvage yard. Staged them on a corner. About 30 minutes later the fire department rolled in...... they ended up cool about it and worked with us on how to set up proper traffic control (which I added into the course) and gave us some real "What the EMT wants when he/she arrives type stuff.

Now I have big signs that say Practice Crash Response ahead. And we let 911 know we are practicing. But the attendees do not know what they are coming up on, I send them on routes and we have three scenarios set up for them to run across over the three days.
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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I like the idea of the Road Captain Course. I've stopped for more crashes and wrecks than I care to remember. I feel naked without having my jump bags with me. It's amazing the potential damage that the untrained but well-intended almost inflict on the injured.
 

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Asylum Inmate
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12,219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I like the idea of the Road Captain Course. I've stopped for more crashes and wrecks than I care to remember. I feel naked without having my jump bags with me. It's amazing the potential damage that the untrained but well-intended almost inflict on the injured.
Was not my idea, instead it is a lost idea I have maintained since the late 70s and into the 80s when I was trained in it as part of the Road Captain certification. To have that patch from California highway Patrol it was required to have CPR, First Aid, and what they use to call Golden Hour Stabilization. (Really it was how not to make it worse before professionals got there)

But for 5 years now every Advanced Class I put on has been full. This year was the first time I had ATV guys coming and asking for the advanced training.

I agree. Though I am not to your level of training, when we do the live scenarios our big deal is when and what to move and how not to maim someone.

I put on two basic courses (First Aid and CPR with a short Blood Borne Pathogen) one in January and one in February for the motorbike community. We get 20 to 30 in each class. But the cost of the advanced class keeps it to four or five people as it costs a good amount of money to put on.
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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24,839 Posts
I agree. Though I am not to your level of training, when we do the live scenarios our big deal is when and what to move and how not to maim someone.
Sounds to me like you got yourself involved enough to find EMT training a piece of cake and PM wouldn't be much trouble for you either. Glad you're involved as you are. It's a good thing you are doing, and you may have saved a few live already without even knowing it.
 

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Asylum Inmate
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12,219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I usually carry a MUCH smaller one but it has all the basics plus quick clot for that one situation that I have no other way to stop bleeding.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App

I am glad to hear you carry a kit. Size is not as important as being able to help.

I like quick clot too.

But the Israeli Bandage is my trained got too for 7 years now.

 

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Banned
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I am little more than a month out before I start the Road Captain first aid training program. These first two are basic CPR, Blood Borne Pathogens, and First Aid. Like to inventory the Kit I carry before starting the program.

This course is a prerequisite before we do the Wilderness First Responder Training in June. That training is three days and fairly intense compared to this training, but well worth it if you ride a lot in remote areas IMO.

So this is my base kit:



I don't bother to pull out the sutures, bandaids, and tapes because once opened they are no longer sterile so just a simple expiration date check is all they go through.



I like to make sure my micro shields are in good condition. I have to replace them about every 6 years.

I test the blood pressure cup and the stethoscope to make sure it has not got damaged from riding along on the bike all spring, summer, and fall.

Look over my Sam Splints both finger splints and arm leg splint are in proper order. Make sure the evacuation bulb is still sealed and flexible. About every 10 years I replace it.



Super bright LED flashlight, Scissors and a tweezers are in the kit. I have hemostats as well, but they are the suture combo unit in sterile packaging so I keep the scissors so I don't have to violate the sterile seal for a simple bandage dressing.



I like a wide variety of tapes, gauzes, and square bandages in the kit as well. Let me deal with a lot of crap cheap.



Sterile solutions, cold packs, and non-sticking bandages are a must. I noticed both my 6 inch and 4 inch Israeli Bandages have gone out of date. Those are on order from Amazon and should be here in a week.



I get a lot of crap for carrying this from the guys, but I have had to use it four times in my life, two times where full air medical evacuation was required, where I was not riding with the wreck I rode up on.... I mean to tell you people are extremely happy when you know what you are doing to help the person laying there bleeding out of their ears or eyes, with an arm or leg folded the wrong way.

Though you don't get your stuff replaced.... you have to just be happy with the fact you helped. Though my local EMTs take care of my kit if I am taking the courses with them instead of teaching it.

If you do not have at the very least Red Cross first aid and CPR training consider finding a place to take it this winter. You will be very happy you have the knowledge if you ever come upon a wreck and no one knows what to do.... just clearing the airway can be the difference between someone surviving and dying.

I will do a follow on thread in the spring when I do the Road Captain First Responder class. I put it together in 1978 and have been doing it ever since, but it has gotten a lot better since I became a wilderness first responder certified 16 years ago.

If any of you are in the Southwest Wyoming, Western Colorado, eastern Utah, North New Mexico, North Arizona areas and want to have the class training schedule please PM you email address and I will get you on the list. First Aid, CPR and Blood Borne Pathogen is fairly cheap. The spring class on First Response is $350.00 just so you know and it will take three days two of which are responding to accidents we have set up on the side of the road for you to roll onto and practice. (We now let 911 know what we are doing.... don't ask why!!!)
No tourniquet?
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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24,839 Posts
Amazing the things that you can make a tourniquet out of in a pinch.
 

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Asylum Inmate
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12,219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
While the technique with the Israeli Bandage has been taught since the 90s, I did some checking at the Mayo Clinic training center.

Turns out they are saying use of the bandage is still ok.

But they now are saying less damage done if first responders use a Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T). Comes from Army battlefield research Iraq and Afghanistan.

Thanks dirtydon. I have two on order to see what they are all about. But the research from army surgery unit is very compelling. I always want my program moving forward hope this can be incorporated if it is easy enough for people to be trained to use.
 

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Banned
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While the technique with the Israeli Bandage has been taught since the 90s, I did some checking at the Mayo Clinic training center.

Turns out they are saying use of the bandage is still ok.

But they now are saying less damage done if first responders use a Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T). Comes from Army battlefield research Iraq and Afghanistan.

Thanks dirtydon. I have two on order to see what they are all about. But the research from army surgery unit is very compelling. I always want my program moving forward hope this can be incorporated if it is easy enough for people to be trained to use.
FWIW I think you are doing a good service with offering this training . :thumbsup
 

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Asylum Inmate
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12,219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
FWIW I think you are doing a good service with offering this training . :thumbsup

Thanks. The hope is to create a lot of people that know what to do.
 

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Banned
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223 Posts
While the technique with the Israeli Bandage has been taught since the 90s, I did some checking at the Mayo Clinic training center.

Turns out they are saying use of the bandage is still ok.

But they now are saying less damage done if first responders use a Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T). Comes from Army battlefield research Iraq and Afghanistan.

Thanks dirtydon. I have two on order to see what they are all about. But the research from army surgery unit is very compelling. I always want my program moving forward hope this can be incorporated if it is easy enough for people to be trained to use.
You're welcome bbally. Glad I could help. FYI, every combat-deployed member of the armed forces carries at least one tourniquet plainly visible and easily accessible at all times. Some units go so far as to specify exactly where and how it will be carried on the uniform or kit.

If you look at my little Avatar, you'll see mine right in the center of my body armor, about a foot under my chin on my middle pistol mag pouch flap. It's attached with rubber bands, can be easily pulled away with either hand, and it's designed so that it can be applied with one hand. These things have probably saved hundreds of lives over the last ten years, and every med/first-aid kit I have contains at least one.
 

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"MacHine"
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379 Posts
Thanks for posting this information. While I am not a medic, do you have a written list of first aid items to always carry on the bike?
 

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Registered
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167 Posts
I actually just threw a couple of CATs I have in the saddlebag. I need to build a proper kit still but I was going through my gear and had a couple sitting there and thought those could come in handy.
 

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Asylum Inmate
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12,219 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for posting this information. While I am not a medic, do you have a written list of first aid items to always carry on the bike?
This is my base kit. I carry this on every ride, local or single overnight:

•3 Alcohol Preps
•5 Antacid Tablets 2/pack
•5 Aspirin 2/pk
•15 Bandages Strips 1" x 3"
•3 Bandages Fingertip
•3 Bandages Knuckle
•6 BZK Antiseptic Towelettes
•5 Cotton Swabs 2/pack
•1 Eye Wash
•2 Eye Pads
•3 Insect Bite Relief Swabs
•2 Sunscreen Towelettes

•15 Bandages Strips 1" x 3"
•10 Butterfly Enclosures
•7 Gauze Pads 2" x 2" 2/pack
•2 Gauze Pads 4" x 4" 2/pack
•5 Antimicrobial Towelletes
•2 Roll Gauze 2"
•1 Kit Scissors
•2 Synthetic Gloves Non Sterile
•6 Triple Antibiotic Ointment Packettes
•1 Tweezers with Magnifier

•1 Elastic Bandage 3"
•2 Instant Cold Packs
•2 Splint Finger 1" x 6"
•1 Ice Bag
•1 Triangle Sling

•5 Burn Jel Packettes
•1 CPR Face Shield
•2 Synthetic Gloves Non Sterile

•1 Israeli Bandage 6 inch and 4 Inch
•1 Large SAM splint (Leg and upper arm)
•1 SAM Splint Medium (Forearm)
•1 SAM Splint fingers 6 in a pack


For trips with a group I carry the following kit in addition to the above kit:

•60 Bandages Assorted
•2 Triangular Bandages 40" x 40"
•1 Elastic Bandage 3" x 5yds.
•2 Pressure Bandages
•10 Gauze Pads 2" x 2"
•10 Gauze Pads 4" x 4"
•3 Roll Gauze 2" x 4yds.
•3 Roll Gauze 4" x 4yds.
•4 Combine Pads 5" x 9"
•25 BZK Towelettes
•8 Iodine Swab Sticks
•1 Bacitracin 1 oz.
•6 Antimicrobial Hand Wipes
•3 Cold Packs
•1 Eyewash 4 oz.
•3 Eye Pads
•1 Tape 1"x10 yds.
•1 Scissors, Paramedic
•1 Stethoscope & BP Cuff
•1 Penlight, disposable
•2 CPR Microsheilds
•1 Bulb Syringe
•3 Bio-Waste Bags, 1 gallon
•1 Rescue Blanket 56" x 84" (space)
•10 Gloves
•1 Israeli Bandage 4 inch
•1 Israeli Bandage 6 Inch
•1 C-A-T Tourniquet (since Monday)

On longer overnight or multiday runs I carry the above two kits plus:

AED with extra leads
Cervical Collar Adjustable
And two head immobilization blocks.

Which seems like a lot of stuff, but I am so used to where it goes on the bike that it does not even phase me. The wife knows it has to go or I feel naked. I would hate to come on an accident or have someone in my group in an accident and know how to help but not have my stuff. That would be bad for me. As I said, when I took the Road Captain certification in California decades ago this was all stuff we had to know.

A lot of it, like the AED, I just added in to my kit and my teaching program as they came along to the mainstream, same with the SAM splint, the SAM splint got rid of those large sticks and plastics. Israeli Bandage about 10 years ago. etc etc....

Only used it four times in all these years...
 
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