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Discussion Starter #1
I remember learning from someone on 1130cc.com that the back brake can greatly help in control of the motorcycle at low speeds and began practice using it. I like what it did. After watching Ride Like A Pro IV it seems like Jerry recommends using a synchronized combination of the friction zone and the back brake. I've begun practicing that as well.

How much of either or both do you use?
 

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The combination of both is good, but weight or use the front brake more actively when on the road. It is more powerful.

The rear brake can help moderate and settle the bike, and can do so at parking lot speeds as well. One advantage of the rear brake on parking lots is when there can be sand or grit, maybe from a recent rain. If using the front brake only it is easier for the bike to wash out. Same is true if taking the big twin down a dirt road. For this you really want to actively use the rear brake, just like dirt bikers do.

But for most road conditions, and maximum stopping power, use both but emphasize the front brake. Have read if one is in a panic stop and the rear wheel locks up and skids, then one was using too much rear and not enough front.
 

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The combination of both is good, but weight or use the front brake more actively when on the road. It is more powerful.

The rear brake can help moderate and settle the bike, and can do so at parking lot speeds as well. One advantage of the rear brake on parking lots is when there can be sand or grit, maybe from a recent rain. If using the front brake only it is easier for the bike to wash out. Same is true if taking the big twin down a dirt road. For this you really want to actively use the rear brake, just like dirt bikers do.

But for most road conditions, and maximum stopping power, use both but emphasize the front brake. Have read if one is in a panic stop and the rear wheel locks up and skids, then one was using too much rear and not enough front.
I have done this a few times. My habit in a panic type situation is to stomp on the rear break, which can cause the rear tire to skid. I did this again last night, which didn't impress my husband.

I keep trying to work on using the front as much as the back, and that works fine when breaking normally. I just can't overcome my instinct to stomp on the rear in a panic situation. Luckily have kept it upright each time so far.
 

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I just can't overcome my instinct to stomp on the rear in a panic situation. Luckily have kept it upright each time so far.
You really need to overcome that bad instinct. If you do nothing to correct this bad habit, there will come a time when you will lock up the rear in a panic situation. Since ~75% of your braking power is in your front brake, what is going to happen when that rear brake is locked up (with even less stopping power now that its locked up)? Its gonna want to keep going forward putting you into a slide. Natural reaction at this point is to ease off the brake, and when that rear tire regains traction, you will end up highsiding your bike spitting you off over top your bike towards what you were trying to avoid in the first place....

What you do in a panic situation will be what you practice on a daily basis. With the surge of energy from adrenaline and loss of fine motor (muscular, not motorcycle) skills in a panic situation, I guarantee you that you will lock up that rear tire unless you change your habits.

I keep trying to work on using the front as much as the back
I hope you now realize that you need to practice using your front brake more than your rear brake.
 

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The front brake has more stopping power. In most vehicles the front brake provides 70% or better stopping power. The rear will lock up easily.
I use the rear to set up for a turn, scrub off some speed, or slow speed stopping. When riding normally, highway, over 40 mph I will apply both front and rear equally.
I started riding on dirt bikes, good way to learn how to brake.
Using just the front brake at speed can cause major problems. Nose diving your bike will put your butt on the ground and not very gracefully.
 

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Generally speaking, smooth controlled and steady application of both the front and rear brake will bring you to a stop most quickly.

If you are moving in a straight line, you can use your front brake on a loose surface. The key is in one's smoothness, "feel" and control. One should be able to use their back brake without locking it up - again, the key is in familiarity with "feel". Locking up your back brake and suddenly releasing it is the perfect precursor to a highside.

Practice smooth be smooth ride on!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Has anyone used a riding simulator?

What KB is talking about seems like a perfect example of how a simulator could be utilized for learning.
See more
http://www.enterleisure.co.uk/mbikes
 

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A good thing to do is go to a unused parking lot and get up to about 10 to 15 miles per hour then lock up your back brake, do this several times. then you will have a good feel for the amount of foot pressure it takes to lock it up. Now you can apply the rear brakes just before that point in real life and then squeeze the heck out of your fronts and you will stop on a dime without locking up the rear.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
There is something liberating about practicing in a partking lot, isn't there. I love the fact that you can manuever around without worry of other traffic and stationary obstacles. It does definitely build confidence.
Now, all I need to do is do it more!
 

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I know practice helps to ingrain correct habits. It just seems that I can practice all day doing it correctly, but still, when the panic situation arises, like last week, I still react by slamming the back brake. Obviously I still need a lot more practice I guess. Hopefully I can unlearn my bad habit.

This is why I am thinking about getting a VROD with ABS. At least I wouldn't be able to lock that back tire.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I love to go out riding on my own periodically so that I can go to work on those skills I know need practice. Just learning from books, tapes, and live people the tragedies that can ensue from bad habits provides the little voice in my head with enough motivation to annoy me if I dare become complacent.:)
 

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There is a motorcop trainer on VTF and he will email you the training manuel if you ask for it ,I promise you will not be sorry.I practice every week and have increased my comfort level and shortened my stopping distance in half.
www.vtwinforums.com harris training manuel.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
A great resource is the "Ride Like A Pro" videos. The latest is RLAP IV.

ridelikeapro.com
That video, IV, is outstanding! It has changed my riding for the better just by watching.
I had a conversation just this afternoon with a fellow who is 50, started riding a minibike at 7, went to dirt bikes at 10 and has been riding motorcycles on the street since 15. He watches the RLAP videos periodically just to keep good thoughts in his head. He even takes the MSF course every few years just to keep in tune. When he's out on the road he'll even practice skills just to see how good he can get.

You have to love a guy like that willing to learn!:notw:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
As you must know, I've been working with control braking recently and yesterday it came in very handy. Because of roadway construction detours I had to ride that 763 lb Road King Classic down a very steep hill with a very blunt ending with a stop sign. At that point there is a somewhat blind right or left turn onto a two way street. A lake is on the other side of the road.

Upon successful completion of the task, with stable and comfortable control of the motorcycle I felt like dancing in glee!

Thank you 1130cc.com members and to the Motorman!
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Ok, a gentlemen who has been riding for over 40 years told me that the technique of mixing throttle, clutch and back brake for control of a motorcycle is so hard on brakes and clutch, with an emphasis on clutch, that it should not be used unless that is the only way one thinks they can control the ride.
What do you folks say?
 

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Ok, a gentlemen who has been riding for over 40 years told me that the technique of mixing throttle, clutch and back brake for control of a motorcycle is so hard on brakes and clutch, with an emphasis on clutch, that it should not be used unless that is the only way one thinks they can control the ride.
What do you folks say?
Back in the day, he might have been correct, but with today's engineering, control is more important to me than any slight damage I may be doing in the overall scheme of things.
 

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the harley wet clutch can take more punishment than we think ,their are motor groups that use the bikes for a couple years and never deal with the clutch
 

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Yeah - it's total cobblers. For starters the clutch slipping/rear brake technique is only for use at parking lot speeds together with handlebar turning, and how much of that do any of us do, and for second today's clutches and brakes can easily handle it.
 
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