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Discussion Starter #1
Ok guys, I've got a 2010 Road King Classic that is being a little stubborn. The headlight, (stock headlight), and running lights work sometimes, then sometimes they don't.
Tell you what I've done so far: I have replaced the lighting relay 2 times, once with an auto dealer relay that matched up, and this last time with an original HD relay. (yes the relay is clicking/working), I have replaced all fuses 2 times, cleaned all fuse plug ins and checked all wires going to the back of the fuse panel. Checked, (with voltage meter), all fuse sockets, ignition switch on tank, all wires going from fuse panel to ignition switch. Took apart front headlight cover, dissassembled headlight housing, checked every connector in headlight housing, greased with dielectric grease, pulled and poked every wire in housing for a loose or burnt or shorted out connector, replaced every ground wire in housing, installed a new headlight, checked, (again with voltage meter), all headlight wires, and I'm still having the same problem. Lights are not flickering or blinking, they just go out and will not come on again or just wont come on all the time. Very inconsistant. Any and all information is certainly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 

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Sounds like you have checked everything, but that sounds like a loose connector somewhere. My guess would be the ignition switch itself may be going bad.
 

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I hate electrical gremlins too. Just for grins, when they all quit again, hit your high beam and see what happens.
 

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The headlight circuit and the running light circuit are separate, one is powered by the headlight fuse, the other is powered by the lighting fuse.

Check the wires between the headlight and lighting fuses and the lighting relay.

Also check the wire between the lighting relay and the wire going into the ignition fuse (black/red), and the wire between the lighting relay and the ECM power fuse (red).

If it were the ignition switch, you would see problems with other circuits as well...

If you have voltmeter handy when the problem occurs, check voltage at terminal 86, 87 and 30 on the lighting relay.

No voltage at 86= bad connection between relay and the wire supplying power to the ignition fuse.

No voltage at 30= bad connection between relay and the wire going in to the ECM Power fuse.

Power at 30 but no power at 87 means the relay is bad.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks a million Dan. I will do just that! That reply was exactly what I was fishing for when I posted this. I appreciate everyone's feedback. Yeah it's a headache tracking this stuff down, but ain't it rewarding when you finally figure it out!!!! It's a love/hate relationship!
 

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I hate electrical gremlins too. Just for grins, when they all quit again, hit your high beam and see what happens.
:thumbsup As Gotgold said try your brights. Factory wiring is set so passing lamps shut off when high beams are turned on, so it could be in the switch. Could also have the pigtail installed that bypasses letting passing lamps stay on when high beam is on, maybe a problem with the pigtail if it has it.
 

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Just a couple of observations: (1) Dielectric grease is INSULATING not high conductive. If you are using it to improve conductivity, you are defeating your intentions. Use high conductive grease for those jobs. (2) I have had one instance where the plug at the headlight had overheated and gotten loose. Result, intermittent headlight. You might want to check there.
 

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Just a couple of observations: (1) Dielectric grease is INSULATING not high conductive. If you are using it to improve conductivity, you are defeating your intentions. Use high conductive grease for those jobs. (2) I have had one instance where the plug at the headlight had overheated and gotten loose. Result, intermittent headlight. You might want to check there.
I fully agree. Even though you may have voltage at a connector is the connector loose? Make it tighter by using your pliers and pinching the connector where it slides on. You replaced a lot of wires so that should eliminate a broken wire within the insulation. But, sometimes not all strands are broken and you will get voltage but for a load you won't get what you need. I would also clean all connectors with electrical spray. Also make sure your highbeam switch on the bars is making good contact when you switch from high to low beam.

I've said this before. My son-in-law and I ride identical bikes. But, mine is newer and has a cover for the fuse box. His does not. His fuse holder got corroded and though the main fuse was good it was not making good contact in the holder. The dealer could not figure it out. He comes home all disappointed. In 30 minutes I fixed the problem by spraying the same stuff you clean air conditioning coils into the fuse holder and then rinsed it off. I took each fuse and cleaned them and he has had NO problem since. Take a piece of nylon cloth and cover the holder to keep it cleaner inside.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I should have been more specific on a couple of things. I didn't go into detail because the original post was getting lengthy. I cleaned every post on the fuse box with contact cleaner. While I did not see any corrosion to speak of, I still used dielectric grease to warrant against that in the future. My fuse holder does have a cover on it,...thankfully. Still, that was a good tip if not.
As far as the inquiries into the hi-beam switch; I have checked and triple checked that switch.
 

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:thumbsup As Gotgold said try your brights. Factory wiring is set so passing lamps shut off when high beams are turned on, so it could be in the switch. Could also have the pigtail installed that bypasses letting passing lamps stay on when high beam is on, maybe a problem with the pigtail if it has it.

When trying to diagnose an electrical problem you need to look at the wiring diagram.

It is not the headlight (dimmer) switch, if the headlight switch was the problem only the headlights would be affected.

The OP`s bike has a problem with the headlights and the running lights.

You have to trace those two circuits back until you find a common source of power that will affect only those two circuits.

The common source is the two wires that power the lighting relay, the relay itself, or the wires between the relay and the lighting and headlight fuses.
 

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When trying to diagnose an electrical problem you need to look at the wiring diagram.

It is not the headlight (dimmer) switch, if the headlight switch was the problem only the headlights would be affected.

The OP`s bike has a problem with the headlights and the running lights.

You have to trace those two circuits back until you find a common source of power that will affect only those two circuits.

The common source is the two wires that power the lighting relay, the relay itself, or the wires between the relay and the lighting and headlight fuses.
I'm more of a machinist not an electrician. And I am assuming what is referred to as running lights are what I call passing/aux/fog lamps. So if by small chance his high beam light was burned out wouldn't he lose both since the running lights are wired to shut off when the high beam is activated?
 

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I'm more of a machinist not an electrician. And I am assuming what is referred to as running lights are what I call passing/aux/fog lamps. So if by small chance his high beam light was burned out wouldn't he lose both since the running lights are wired to shut off when the high beam is activated?


Yes.



:coffee:
 

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Running lights are the lights that are on whenever the ignition is on.

There are running lights in the front turn signals, and in the rear there are running lights in the tail light, and also on some tour packs etc.

The 4-1/2 inch beams on the front light bar are not running lamps, they are Auxiliary lamps or Passing lamps.

If the OP has an issue with the larger 4-1/2 inch passing/auxiliary lights, that is a different story.

OP: is your issue with the running lights or passing lights?
 

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Running lights are the lights that are on whenever the ignition is on.

There are running lights in the front turn signals, and in the rear there are running lights in the tail light, and also on some tour packs etc.

The 4-1/2 inch beams on the front light bar are not running lamps, they are Auxiliary lamps or Passing lamps.

If the OP has an issue with the larger 4-1/2 inch passing/auxiliary lights, that is a different story.

OP: is your issue with the running lights or passing lights?

I also refer to them as Passing/Auxiliary/fog lamps, but believe it or not some parts of the country do refer to them as running lights. Go to Ebay and type harley running lights and you will see a few listed.
 

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I also refer to them as Passing/Auxiliary/fog lamps, but believe it or not some parts of the country do refer to them as running lights. Go to Ebay and type harley running lights and you will see a few listed.
Look on the wiring diagram in the service manual.

Running lights are the lights that are in the front directionals and the tail light. Fender tip lights and tour pack marker lights will also use this circuit.

The 4-1/2 inch lights on the front are called Aux lamps.
 

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Look on the wiring diagram in the service manual.

Running lights are the lights that are in the front directionals and the tail light. Fender tip lights and tour pack marker lights will also use this circuit.

The 4-1/2 inch lights on the front are called Aux lamps.
Dan, I am fully aware what running lights are and how it is written in the service manual and I completely agree with you. All I'm saying is that some persons will refer to aux lamps as running lamps or lights. Kind of like the service manual lists a jiffy stand, I will always refer to it as a kick stand. So all I was trying to say was there is a small possibility when he said running lights he may have meant Aux lamps.
 

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Ok RoadKingAl...

How about clarifying which lights are not working so that we are all on the same page...
 
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