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Discussion Starter #1
Well I am new to the Harley world having bought my first one last year being the 2008 model Nightster. I have also recently purchased a 1993 Heritage, so I guess you can say Im hooked now.

About me..well I am an Aussie and live in the South West of Western Australia in a town called Bunbury. I work all over the world as a saturation diving supervisor, at the time of writing this I am about 150 miles off the east coast of India in the Bay of Bengal.

From what I have seen so far this is the best Harley Forum around and I am pleased that I have been able to join it, so thanks everyone :).

Regards

Wayne
 

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Hello Dave 63

With direct reference to your definition of sarchasm at the bottom of your replies, and given your question "What's a 150 mile extension cord cost?" . It is probably appropriate that I reply Dave63 with..."It is better to remain silent and be assumed a fool, than to open your mouth and remove all doubt"

Regards

Wayne

Oh and Dave63..Im in India at the moment but I have had a very good look around the world...trust me on this..It does matter where you come from mate!
 

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Good day mate and welcome.
I'm a newbie here as well from the left coast of the U.S. and I don't believe I've offended anyone yet.
Good to have you onboard.

Krusr
 

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Hey Dave63

The 1993 Heritage I have has a 6 gallon tank with chrome sides. I am trying to find info on this..was it a limited release thing, is it a genuine Harley tank (certainly looks it) did it come on any other models etc. I have scoured the internet looking for info with no luck. Where is the best place to post these questions.

Regards

Wayne

PS ...DiamondLil, Dave63 and Krusr...thanks for the warm welcomes.
 

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Hello Dave63

Thanks for that OEM...meaning Original Equipment Manufacturer (I had to look that up before I replied..lol ). I will check it out when I get home...still working in paradise for another week yet..but thanks again.

Regards

Wayne
 

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Hey Wayne, Welcome to the forum!

Interesting line of work you have there. What is saturation diving?
 

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Just passing thru
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Just another point, Wayne: 1993 had a very limited edition, 90th anniversary softail already, called the FLSTN Moo-Glide. Only 2700 made...

Enjoy your trip. Glad to have you with us.





I know where one of them is.


 

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Saturation Diving

Hello Eze Rider

Saturation diving is a technique which has really only been developed over the last couple of decades. It was a time probably best described as dangerous learning process with a lot of people dyeing, however what was learnt enables us to do what we do today. This technique allows divers to live at a pressurized depth in a chamber on a vessel or barge for periods of up to and beyond 30 days or more at a time. For you to understand how this works I have to touch on a little bit of physiology so I will try not to bore you too much but I don’t see any other way.

When diver is underwater the weight of the water (pressure) causes the air/gas that he is breathing to turn into what is commonly referred to as a physical solution in the blood stream. The level of this concentration is dependent upon certain factors, primarily though, time and depth. When this pressure is released ( the diver comes up or surfaces) the physical solution turns back into a gas and escapes the body. If the pressure is released quickly then there is a risk that this solution, as it turns back into a gas, will become trapped as bubbles within the bloodstream or tissue. These bubbles can then travel to the brain or heart causing a variety of neurological problems and in some cases death. This is what is commonly referred to as the bends or decompression sickness.

However there is a point where the body under pressure cannot take on any more gas and this point is known as saturation. So if a diver is at say at 500 feet for 2 hours it will take him roughly 1 day for every hundred feet plus a day to decompress, in this case 6 days. If a diver is at this depth for thirty days or more, the decompression time remains the same.

What occurs in commercial diving operations then is that a team of divers, usually nine, working in three eight hour shifts live at pressure in a dry chamber which is pressured with helium and oxygen. Helium is used as it is an inert gas and simply a carrier the same as nitrogen is the carrier with air. Nitrogen is not used in this instance because of the narcotic affect it has on the body at depth and is therefore dangerous. On top of one of the chambers is a diving bell and this is connected via a trunking similar to a tunnel. The divers go into the bell via the trunking, a door is closed/lowered in the bell and the bell is then over pressured. The trunking is then vented to atmosphere/surface, leaving the bell and chambers now separate but still under pressure. The bell is then lowered through a hole in the centre of the ship (moonpool) to depth. The door on the bottom of the bell is open and the water sits at the bottom because the pressures are equal. Both divers get dressed into their equipment and go out to work whilst the third tends their hoses and monitors the bell atmosphere and a variety of gauges. The process is coordinated and controlled from the surface by the diving supervisor (me) who is in control of the entire operation including the vessel when in an operational diving mode. Everything is monitored and recorded on closed circuit TV and each diver also has a camera on his helmet, also recorded. At the end of 8 hours the bell is sealed (divers remain at same atmospheric depth) and then recovered to the surface, mated onto the diving system and the divers transfer under pressure back into the chamber, or swap out with the next team. There is a lot to understand here regarding partial pressures of gases O2, Co2 and how they react at depth on the body, also pressure and temperature changes, so an in depth knowledge of laws such as Boyles, Charles Daltons and even Archimedes Principle is required. O yeah, you also have had to have been a pretty experienced diver and pass a lot of examinations before anyone will let you anywhere near an operation of this type. Well I know it’s a bit drawn out but I hope this goes some way in answering your question. I have attached a couple of pics to give you a bit of an idea

Cheers Mate

Wayne
 

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Just passing thru
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Great explanation Wayne. Thanks for taking the time to explain. What are you fellows trying to achieve?
 

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Good Question

What are you fellows trying to achieve?

Um....you mean apart from trying to retain our sanity :)

This particular project involves the tie in (connection) of a number of 24 inch gas pipelines to a newly commissioned platform in 326 feet of water. There is a tremendous amount of sub sea construction work going on at the moment, all over the world, due to the price of oil and Chinas ongoing demand for resources...and it doesnt look like it is going to slow down either.

Wayne
 
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