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Discussion Starter #704

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^^^^ Irreplaceable from a ship that no longer exists except in history
 
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On July 18, 1918,PFC George Dilboy, a Greek native of Ottoman Turkey who migrated to the US, was deep into the Aisne-Marne offensive with the men of the 103rd Infantry, 26th Yankee division.
His platoon was ordered to recon a train station near Belleau, France when he and his platoon commander came under heavy MG fire. Completely exposed, Dillboy fixed his bayonet and made a lone charge across 100 yards of field directly towards the MG nest. Despite having his leg nearly severed above the knee from the bullets, he crawled his way forward and took out the crew with rifle fire from 25 yards. He died of his wounds and was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Wilson.
The 22 year old was initially buried in France, but at the request of his father, his remains were buried in Alatsat, Turkey.
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During the Greco-Turkish war of 1922, rampaging Turkish soldiers seized the town, and in the process, his grave was desecrated, along with the American Flag being stolen from his casket.
Upon hearing this, enraged president Warren G. Harding sent a US warship to Turkey to recover his remains, demanded a formal apology from the Turkish government and forced a Turkish honor guard to deliver his remains draped once again in an American Flag.
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Dilboy was escorted all the way to Arlington with full military honors with president Calvin Coolridge presiding at his burial in 1923.
Dilboy had the distinction of being honored by 3 Presidents and according to General Pershings, considered one of the ten great heroes who died in the battlefield of France with super human heroism and valor
 

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On Nov 26, 1970, Sgt. Edward Ziobron and his recon team from MAC V SOG, where tasked with conducting a clandestine operation deep into Laos.
Upon insertion, the team came under intense fire from an overwhelming enemy force. Although wounded in the face, left arm and leg by a B40 Rocket, Ziobron led an uphill charge against the entrenched enemy, killing 10 communists with rifle fire and hand grenades. Upon reaching the top of the ridge, he took an M60 and continued his assault under murderous fire, killing 6 more in the process.
The next day, the team decided to call in an extract to get the wounded out. On the way, the team came under fire from two AA guns. Ziobron took out them out with a LAW rocket launcher like it was no big deal.
The enemy then launched an attack with the intention of annihilating the team. Through the chaos, Ziobron stood his ground, although wounded again by another rocket. At the same time, 2 NVA soldiers attacked him and hand to hand fighting ensued.
Ziobron killed one with his .45 pistol and the other, he beat to death with his own SKS. With the battle raging, he was shot in the right leg and his Achilles tendon severed. Using his CAR 15 as a crutch, he began calling danger close air strikes, took out about 20 NVA with claymores and rescued one of his mates under fire.
With the enemy closed in to a few meters, he killed 2 more with his pistol and one with an M79 round. His actions inflicted such heavy casualties, which broke the attack.
Despite his wounds, he led his team to the LZ and were extracted the following morning. When he boarded the helo, he was down to only 3 bullets left.
For his actions, Ziobron was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.
 

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On the night of Dec. 20, 1989, Army Ranger SSG Louis Olivera leaped out of a C-130 transport 600 feet over the Rio Hato airstrip during the Panama invasion.
As crashed through the jungle canopy, he became entangled onto a power line, only 100 yards from enemy barracks. After he freed himself, he began to carefully make his way to his RV point until he was ambushed by two Panamanian soldiers.
From a range of 50 feet, Olivera was hit square in the chest by two AK47 bullets. One bullet tore through two ribs and punctured his right lung. The other bullet severed the muscle above his right collar bone.
Olivera was knocked onto his back. The Panamanians approached, began rifling through his pockets for maps and documents, and discovered that he was dazed but still alive.
At point-blank range, one Panamanian soldier fired at Olivera`s head. The bullet hit the lip of his kevlar helmet, tore through the 19 layers of fibers and resin, and was deflected just enough that it didn`t kill him outright.
Instead, the bullet struck Olivera above the left eye, fractured his skull, tore off a major chunk of the skin on his skull, and glanced off, knocking him unconscious.
The two Panamanian troopers left him for dead, tagging him with a black bandana that was the signature of a ''kill''.
The bullet to the head just happened to be a tracer round, and the heat of the burning chemical cauterized the ruptured blood vessels as the bullet passed through muscle and flesh.
Olivera regained consciousness the following morning and used his radio to call for help and was eventually rescued.
At the aid station, a chaplain offered Olivera last rites. ''No, I don`t think I need that. I`m doing just fine, really,'' Olivera mumbled.
On Dec. 22, Gen. Carl Vuono pinned the Purple Heart on the wounded Olivera. Vuono also pinned the Purple Heart that day on another soldier who fell by heat exhaustion. (that's not a joke).
 

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The man here is David A. Christian, who enlisted in the US Army in 1966 at the age of 17. After being rapidly promoted through the enlisted ranks to Sergeant, he was admitted to Officer Candidate School (OCS) and commissioned at 18 years old (making him one of the youngest officers) and making Christian the youngest commissioned officer of the 20 and 21st centuries. He then completed Airborne School and U.S. Army Special Forces training. He was sent to Vietnam in 1968 serving with the 1st Infantry Division - 75th Rangers (LRRP), earning a Distinguished Service Cross when he repelled a major NVA assault against his 9 men team behind enemy lines, taking out bunkers, calling danger close fire missions, leading his men under tremendous enemy fire and killing scores of communists with grenades, rifle and anti tank fire; all while being severely wounded himself. Adding all of it on top of his 2 Silver Stars, 7 Purple Hearts, 2 Bronze Stars and much more. To top it off, he was promoted to Captain at age 20. He was medically retired from the Army at age 21.
 

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Zero F's given.

785460
 
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^^^^ Heading for Seattle ?
 

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Nope, I believe that is somewhere in the 'stans with that Russian Ural.
 

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Enter Capt. Eddie Rickenbacker, an Ohio WW1 pilot who lived on pure adrenaline and no fucks. Prior to his enlistment, Eddie was a race car driver, competing in the Indianapolis 500 four times, earning him the nickname "Fast Eddie". When the US entered the Great War, Eddie joined the US Army Air Service and was shipped off to the France among the first American troops.
In a span of 6 months, he claimed 26 aerial kills, making him one of the top U.S. aces in the war, earned 7 Distinguished Services Crosses and the Medal of Honor for single-handedly shooting down planes when he was completely outnumbered. He is considered one of the most decorated soldiers of the war.
Rickenbacker was not only known for his actions during the war, but for also slapping death in the face numerous times. Just to name a few, while flying on a commercial DC3 in 1941, the plane went down and crashed outside of Atlanta. In spite of his own critical wounds, Rickenbacker rescued survivors until he was taken to the hospital
His body was so mangled that the doctors just left him for dead...but walked out of the hospital a few months later.
During WW2, while flying on a B-17 over the Pacific, the plane ran out of fuel and the crew ditched into Japanese waters, resulting in staying adrift for 24 days with little water and food until being rescued by the U.S. Navy.
Eddie continued to work in the aviation industry, as military consultant and automotive designer.
In 1973, Rickenbacker passed away, but his name remains etched in history, several Halls of Fame and in the minds of thousands of women who needed a skullfucker in their lives.
 

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Nope, I believe that is somewhere in the 'stans with that Russian Ural.
Just a bit of wishful thing. Someone needs to to give no fuckems up there.
 
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Discussion Starter #718

Happy Birthday ARMY , 245 years old today !!!!
It is also Flag Day , and, POTUS's birthday.
So get them flags out.

785519
 

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Michael E. Thornton, Vietnam 1972

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while participating in a daring operation against enemy forces. PO Thornton, as Assistant U.S. Navy Advisor, along with a U.S. Navy lieutenant serving as Senior Advisor, accompanied a 3-man Vietnamese Navy SEAL patrol on an intelligence gathering and prisoner capture operation against an enemy-occupied naval river base. Launched from a Vietnamese Navy junk in a rubber boat, the patrol reached land and was continuing on foot toward its objective when it suddenly came under heavy fire from a numerically superior force. The patrol called in naval gunfire support and then engaged the enemy in a fierce firefight, accounting for many enemy casualties before moving back to the waterline to prevent encirclement. Upon learning that the Senior Advisor had been hit by enemy fire and was believed to be dead, PO Thornton returned through a hail of fire to the lieutenant's last position; quickly disposed of 2 enemy soldiers about to overrun the position, and succeeded in removing the seriously wounded and unconscious Senior Naval Advisor to the water's edge. He then inflated the lieutenant's lifejacket and towed him seaward for approximately 2 hours until picked up by support craft. By his extraordinary courage and perseverance, PO Thornton was directly responsible for saving the life of his superior officer and enabling the safe extraction of all patrol members, thereby upholding the highest traditions of the U.S. Naval Service.[5]


I looked through the citations and didn't see this yet. I had to post it because I was there. Mike often went by the nickname "Iron Mike" back in the day. During this time, my ship, the USS Newport News CA-148, was providing gunfire support for a huge amphibious operation in an attempt to encircle a North Vietnamese force. The above citation pretty much sums up what resulted in Mike's MoH. Our ship's launch picked up the team in the water. I got to interview Mike in sick bay after they medivac'd his team leader off. Much of the little story I wrote for the ship's daily newspaper is in the citation. I found the citation in the Navy Times the next year while serving at the Submarine Force HQ. As I'm finding in my Dad's memoir, we remember things differently at times. Mike's recollection in the Wikipedia link above, and my own memories differ somewhat.

One of the more interesting things about this is that Mike's team leader, Thomas R. Norris, earned a MoH (check his citation through the link). So Mike earned an MoH for saving the life of a MoH recipient. Far as I know, only one of those.
 
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