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I have the 73 XLH and the starter relay just won’t send electricity to the solenoid. I was using the old school mechanical relay and had one go bad, replaced it with the same mechanical one, It lasted about a week and shit the bed. When I tested it I get 12.1 off the red BAT wire, 11.5 off the start button and nothing coming off the lug to the solenoid. My local parts guy suggested I switch to an electronic relay and told me the old mechanical ones are notorious for failing. He gave me an ar1-012-c21m relay to put on, did my research and I believe hooked it up right but still get nothing. But as soon as grab an 11/16 and jump the solenoid she fires right up. And I get the same readings as I did with the old relay, is there a magical tip here that I’m missing? I’m including a picture of the way I have it set up now
786874
 

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There are not enough wires connected to that relay...
 

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Where's the ground wire?
 

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This forum is Rife with posters who ask for help but then fail to follow up..

Waiting for EricDowney18 to follow up on his post...
 

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You have a 5 pin relay. It should be numbered on the relay as pin 30 pin 85 pin 86 pin 87 and pin 87a

Pin 30 is always power, pin 30 sends power to the load, then you also connect power to either pin 85 or pin 86 it doesn't matter which one. The one you connect power to let's say you put power to pin 85, then you would run a ground wire to pin 86. Pins 85 and 86 are the coil connections inside the relay, when power is applied to the coil it will act like a magnet that will "pull" the single pole, in the relay, from "normally closed" "NC" pin 87a to pin 87 "normally open" "NO".

Then whatever "load" or "device" is connected to pin 87 will be activated. In your case the solenoid.

Check out this video
5 Pin Relay Operation and Basic Function

HTH
 

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Pin 30 is always power
Not always...

Look at enough Harley Davidson wiring diagrams and you will see over the years that pins 30 and pin 87 have both been used as power in to the relay.

It does matter which way you connect pins 85 and 86, because some relays are diode protected. Standard practice is power to terminal 86, terminal 85 to ground.

I don`t think the op is around anymore, probably took the bike to the dealer...
 

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So you are saying Harley relays are different than standard 5 pin relays? Did you watch the video I posted the link to? My harley 2003 fxstsi wiring diagram shows pin 30 getting constant power pin 87a not being used pin 87 feeding the load 5 Pin Relay Operation and Basic Function

I am confused by your statement here is a pic of my wiring diagram relays
 

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I never said the relays that Harley uses are different, I said that Harley has used both pin 30 and pin 87 as power in to the relay.

Power in to pin 30 is the standard way, but don`t assume this is how it is on all Harleys...
 

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I think its a simple confusion here. There are two sets of lines to the relay, the control and the signal. Automotive use power is 12V so that is what is applied to the control lines (85 and 86) to activate the relay. Since in automotive use we are also applying 12V to the signal lines (30 and 87) it might appear that power is being used at both and in a way it is.

In the application in the OP, 12V (sometimes called 12V sw) low current is applied thru the hand grip starter button to the coil of the starter relay at 85 and 86. When energized 12V high current is applied to the starter thru relay pins 30 and 87. The whole reason for the relay is to handle higher current thru 30 and 87. The amount of current thru 30 and 87 would melt the hand grip starter button or would require a much more robust and larger starter switch on the handle bar.

So 12V is applied to both 86 and 30 but for different reasons. Pin 86 is for switching, pin 30 is for applying or removing power to a device, in this case the starter. In this application pin 30 has constant 12V and pin 86 has 12V when you push the start button.
 
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Bottom line pin 30 is the 12 volt power to the load, when pin 87 is closed, by power to the coil 85 and 86, the coil creates a magnet which pulls the single pole from pin 87a which is not hooked up to anything, to pin 87 then you have 12 volts to the load via pin 30 and 87

As an example You could use pin 87a to power another device if you wanted to. Example high beam headlight on pin 87 low beam on pin 87a, low beam goes out when you hit the high beam switch since the connection goes to pin 87 and away frompin 87a. thun off the high beam switch the single pole goes back to pin 87a low beam
 

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Let me try this again.
On most Harleys, power comes from the electrical system and is connected at pin 30.

When relay is activated, power passes through the switch inside the relay to pin 87.

The is the normal way.

However, on some older Harleys (and metrics) 30 and 87 are wired opposite to this, power goes in to pin 87, and comes out pin 30.
 

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Let me try this again.
On most Harleys, power comes from the electrical system and is connected at pin 30.

When relay is activated, power passes through the switch inside the relay to pin 87.

The is the normal way.

However, on some older Harleys (and metrics) 30 and 87 are wired opposite to this, power goes in to pin 87, and comes out pin 30.
Ok got it. I wonder why Harley did that on older bikes
 
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