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It's probably not going to be very enforceable. Unless they set up a specific sting the police are not going to be able to reach the motorcycle or even let the rider know they're after him/her.

There is at least one other thread on lane-splitting here. England seems to have the most studies on it and they don't show it's any more dangerous than not splitting.
 

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its not really legal here ,but its not really illegal here either. hope they make it legal completly but then i fear they will have that all scewed up to .. (hey its cali they screw up everything)
 

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Here is article about the ONE person who had nothing better to than whine. Now we need a law to for Lane Splitting. Which cost tax money to print & enforce. Things were just fine. CHP had some common sense guide lines for riders. Part of their job keep you safe on freeway.

Lone complaint forces CHP to remove lane-splitting guidelines from website
July 18, 2014

-- A single complaint from a Sacramento man has forced the California Highway Patrol and other state government agencies to remove information from their websites that was intended to help motorcyclists safely execute the allowed lane-splitting maneuver.

Kenneth Mandler, a longtime state employee who now conducts training sessions on how to get a state job, petitioned the California Office of Administrative Law in 2013, claiming the CHP created an "underground regulation" by formulating and distributing guidelines for safe lane splitting.

Lane splitting, also called lane filtering, is the practice of riding a motorcycle or scooter between lanes of stopped or slowly moving traffic. The practice has been permitted in California for decades and no statute prohibits it. No other state allows the maneuver.

The CHP posted its guidelines with the intention of helping motorcyclists and motorists understand safe practices and to discourage unsafe lane splitting.

"Some have interpreted the recently published Motorcycle Lane Splitting Guidelines as rules, laws or regulations that could or would be enforced by the department," according to a CHP statement. "The guidelines were never intended for this purpose and were prepared simply as common sense traffic safety tips and to raise public awareness."

The Office of Administrative Law sided with Mandler, noting that CHP Commissioner J. A. Farrow certified that his department would not "issue, use, enforce, or attempt to enforce the public education information." The OAL determined that posting the guidelines on the website was "issuing" them.

"By forcing the California Highway Patrol to remove its guidelines, Mr. Mandler and the Office of Administrative Law are denying the public vital safety information," said Nick Haris, AMA western states representative and a member of the California Motorcyclist Safety Program Advisory Committee, which helped write the guidelines.

"Lane splitting is still allowed, and motorcyclists are still using this long-recognized riding technique to relieve traffic congestion and improve safety," Haris said. "But now, neither riders nor motorists have a place to turn for authoritative guidelines on the practice."

The AMA supports the continued use of safe lane splitting in California and the implementation of lane-splitting laws in other states, coupled with extensive rider and driver education programs.

The AMA position statement reads, in part: "Reducing a motorcyclist's exposure to vehicles that are frequently accelerating and decelerating on congested roadways can be one way to reduce front- and rear-end collisions for those most vulnerable in traffic."

Denny Kobza, of the Bay Area Riders' Forum and a member of the California Motorcyclist Safety Program Advisory Committee, said he was extremely disappointed that the CHP was forced to take down the guidelines.

"It is very disturbing that one person can affect three years of hard work," Kobza said. "We put a lot of hard work into those guidelines, because lane splitting is a safer way to go than waiting for a motorist to make a mistake."

Kobza said he has full faith in the California Highway Patrol's continued advocacy for motorcycle safety, and he hopes the guidelines can be reposted to state government websites soon.
 
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I'm not if its legal or not in New Zealand, but we all do it. Every now and then a driver gets the pip and closes up on you. I had close up the gap on me a couple of weeks ago. Truck on the other side. No where to go, so tried to accelerate out of it. Forgot my toes stick out on he forward controls so my foot jammed against the car and my whole leg got dragged behind me. Swung the bike into the truck. Fortunately ended up just ahead of the truck. Very scared and painful. Head was spinning afterward but I didn't want to stop incase I couldn't get back on the bike.
 

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Personally, I don't lane-split. You don't know what the cars are gonna do, and it's not enough distance between me and the cars for my personal comfort. To each his own.
I agree. We get run over by lane changers as it is. I've been an avid bike rider for 50 years and I love to ride. But, I'm wondering what gives the motorcyclist the privy to pass all those 4 wheel vehicles on crowded roads anyway. It just makes those drivers all the more upset that a set of rules would be different for us bikers than for them. Next thing you know those drivers will be driving down side walks and safety lanes to get the same bennies as the bikers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah, the hot-doggers deserve what they get. The one temptation for me to lane-split is my air-cooled bike. When I'm sitting on and on-ramp with 30 cars in front of me and one car allowed to go at a time, I worry about overheating and wear on the engine.
 

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Yeah, the hot-doggers deserve what they get. The one temptation for me to lane-split is my air-cooled bike. When I'm sitting on and on-ramp with 30 cars in front of me and one car allowed to go at a time, I worry about overheating and wear on the engine.
Went for about 10 miles on 101 one hot day with Marie on back. Just kept putting along the stopped traffic. Some drivers actually moved over a skinch let us go by. I could hear Marie saying thank you as we went by.
 
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Went for about 10 miles on 101 one hot day with Marie on back. Just kept putting along the stopped traffic. Some drivers actually moved over a skinch let us go by. I could hear Marie saying thank you as we went by.
That's the way it ought to be EVERYWHERE. I never figured out why people in cars got upset at people on bikes for movin' along in situations like that. They got A/C, radios (okay a lot of y'all got radios on your bike), they are out of the elements. What the hell difference does it make if a biker just eases on by? People are sh1#house nuts.
 
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When I'm sitting on and on-ramp with 30 cars in front of me and one car allowed to go at a time, I worry about overheating and wear on the engine.
This is the only reason I would do it, and the main reason I have considered it at times even though its not legal around here.

As for enforcement, they'll start doing like they do with traffic cams, get a pic of the license plate and mail you a ticket if you're going too fast through the traffic.
 
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