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Hey Folks- passenger no more, went and purchased a 99” super glide back in May. Im 5’10/ 240lb woman and I’m finding myself a little cramped on it, not to mention going above 55-60mph is tough. Im wondering if a larger windshield would fix my issues dealing with wind/ and or do I find a different bike that I can stretch out more. I’d like to do longer trips and be comfortable. Thanks peeps
 

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Does it have the stock seat, or did someone put a 'reduced reach' seat on it?

Forward controls or mids?

Stock bars or aftermarket?


Too many variables here without knowing your bike specifics.
 

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The angle of the windshield makes a difference. Laidback = wind more in the face, Straighter up = wind over the helmet. Make and style of windshield affects how much adj. can be made.
 

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Welcome to the forum from SoCal.

You don't need a different bike to fit you. You mod the one you have to fit you! We all do that to some degree. The whole point of comfort mods!

My last HD was a 1980 Super Glide. At 6'0", 200 lbs. i found it to be super comfy with forward controls. Mine had a King / Queen seat so it formed a backrest. It had a tiny windscreen on it that mostly kept the bug impacts off my chest and most but not all off the face. As stated above, windscreens control helmet buffeting, when you take your time to order the "right height" for you. Otherwise they just help reduce the "Kite effect" against the upper body. The more windscreen you have, the more "out of the wind" you'll feel. Another big reason "most" of us "old guys" ride Geezer Glides 🙃

Mid controls on the bike make you sit up (higher in the wind) than forward controls. As forwards place you in more of a reclined position thus less height in the wind.

I was often swapping bars on that bike: Since i mostly rode it for commuting here in SoCal where lane splitting is legal and the norm, i prefered drag bars because they're narrow. Then ran some short apes from time to time. Just for fun. The bars changes how cupped the torso is in catching the wind.

Tweak that bike to make it your own! Comfy and reliable!
 
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not to mention going above 55-60mph is tough.
Bet you have one of those "cafe buckets" on the front.. Yes a windshield will change everything with speed comfort!

My wife hated freeway speeds on her Sporty, until i put a windshield on it.. Now she will take lead at 80 without hesitation. Huge difference!

Note: Remember to grip the bars "Like your holding a baby chick and don't want to kill it" keeping your arms and grip loose. This will make the bike handle like it is supposed to and really reduce fatigue when riding! My wife puts a death grip on the bars, then tells me its acting wobbly... Well no chit! RELAX! Over gripping causes all kinds of weird inputs to the steering and increases fatigue greatly. Practice at lower speed and then keep the same hold on the highway. You really won't blow off the back.. It just takes some getting use to.

One more: Soften up the rear shocks (if you have the adjustable type.) The owners and service manuals have the shock settings stupid harsh! Back it off to where it feels a little squishy or squirmy. Then add stiffness back in a click at a time. This makes the bike feel much more stable and comfortable at speed! This will help you relax more too!
 
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I have a somewhat similar bike to yours (1997 FXSTC, so narrow front tire, narrow forks though mine are set apart wider than yours, etc), but I am 5'8" with a 31" inseam.

But, any bike can be made to be comfortable for any kind of riding, even yours. If people can make a Sportster comfortable for touring, you can make anything work. It's really up to you and your budget and how much you're willing to spend, whether you want to modify what you have or trade it in for something more fitting (but even then, it's hard to find a model that's a perfect fit without some modification).

For lower comfort for trips, start with a seat that works for you. Where you adjust everything else to be comfortable is going to be determined by where and how you sit on it, which going to be determined by the seat. Personally, I find sitting upright rather than slouched in to be much more comfortable. I really like my Mustang wide touring seat with backrest. Not everyone finds these seats comfortable though, it's all personal preference. If you like your existing seat, that's fine too, you don't necessarily have to have a touring type of seat.

Does your bike have an engine guard? If so, you can put highway pegs on it. If you don't have an engine guard and don't want to put one on, try looking into mini floorboards. Many of them are adjustable. I have a set from J&P cycles, and they're pretty adjustable (angle, distance, etc). That can go a long way for leg comfort. There's definitely better looking (but more expensive) mini floorboards out there, with varying levels of adjustability.

As far as a windshield, yes it helps. I take trips all the time on my bike and for a long time, I didn't have a windshield. It's been a night-and-day difference having one. I have a Memphis Shades quick-detach sport shield (Del Rio) with a cheap windshield extension from Amazon. Getting the windshield height and angle correct is important. For a windshield, generally speaking, the top is supposed to be even with the tip of your nose and you should look over it rather than through it. A touring style windshield would provide better protection and less chance of helmet buffeting, but to me they can look goofy on bikes with narrow front ends. But even the sportshield takes away a lot of the pressure on the chest. I also added Memphis Shades custom lowers, which reduce wind coming under the windshield as well as reducing wind on the legs.

You can ask anyone here that knows me, I do distance all the time. Even earlier this year, I did an Iron Butt (SS1K - 1,000 miles in 24 hours) on this bike with this setup. It's perfectly comfortable for me, your needs might be different. What works for one person will be different than for another.

This is my setup:
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Fuel tank Plant
Tire Automotive lighting Vehicle Automotive tail & brake light Fuel tank
Tire Wheel Land vehicle Vehicle Car
 
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I remember watching this video a few years ago regarding windshield height. Hope it helps . . .

 
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