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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My battery cables keep vibrating loose on my 84 FLT. It's become a monthly routine service. I decided to cut up an old rubber truck mud flap to place in the bottom and back side of the battery tray to absorb the vibration. I'm hoping this will eliminate or at least slow down the loosening connections. One less maintennace chore would be nice! I'll let you know if it works.
 

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Gee thanks
 

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I apply a little bit of blue locktite, I recently had a problem with the connection to the starter getting corrosion and not supplying full voltage to start my custom built Softail. So far after the locktite I've had no issues.
 

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I use star washers for all my battery connections, I us the inverted ones where the tangs are on the inside, I wouldn't use locktite on battery connections, on a car I would but not on a motorcycle battery.
I also use inverted star washers..only put a small drop of locktite on the threads of the bolts. Seems to work well for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I use star washers for all my battery connections, I us the inverted ones where the tangs are on the inside, I wouldn't use locktite on battery connections, on a car I would but not on a motorcycle battery.
Agreed. Plasic isn't conductive material. I also use star washers but I still need to re-tighten once a month.
 

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Agreed. Plasic isn't conductive material. I also use star washers but I still need to re-tighten once a month.
Loctite won`t hurt a thing, because the bolt is not the conductor.

The electrical path is through the battery post and the ring on the cable terminal, the bolt just keeps them tight to each other.
 

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Electricity will always take the path of least resistance.

As I said, the path of least resistance in the battery cable connection is from the ring on the battery cable to the surface of the battery post, the bolt holds those two parts together securely, so they make good electrical contact.

That is the path of the current.

If the battery cable terminal ring is not tight against the battery post, the current will arc across, melting the terminal, the amount that goes through the bolt is insignificant, otherwise the bolt would be welded to the post.

Like I said, you do not have to believe me.
 

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Ever notice that the crud builds up on the top of the battery post over time.... NOT down in the threads?
The contact point for the current is right at the top... As that contact wears or loosens the crud begins to build up.

If you could make a non conductive plastic or rubber bolt strong enough to withstand the torque, it would work just fine! No different than the way home wires attach to a outlet or a wall switch. It's the contact surface of the eye, against the battery that makes the electrical connection. NOT THE BOLT! The bolt does need to be tight in order to keep the contact secured. That is all the bolt does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for your explanations. I suppose if the bolts were brass, aluminum or a combination your explanation is believable. If the bolts are metal then I believe they will conduct electrical current. Incidentally, the rubber has done it's job so far. All connections are tight so far. Thank you all for your insight.
 

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If the bolts are metal then I believe they will conduct electrical current.
Yes, if they are metal they are conductive material, but the electricity will only pass through the bolt if the bolt is the path of least resistance.

In this case the bolt is not the path of least resistance.
 
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