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Discussion Starter · #82 ·
You are doing a great job Brian! Keep up the hard work and it will look great.
Thanks! I’m really amazed at how well it’s coming along.

I hadn’t been on a motorcycle for two years and picked up a 2006 Honda Silverwing 600 maxi scooter in April. It had been sitting in storage for at least five years and needed a fair amount of work to get road ready.

The biggest problem was the fuel tank rusted from the inside out and had to be replaced. Maxi scooter fuel tanks are way down low in the frame, between your feet, next to the ground. The fuel pump, filter and fuel gauge sending unit are inside the tank.

That’s what really forced me to start wrenching on bikes; swapping the fuel tank on that was a major PIA and I had to buy a decent tool set as well as other specific tools to start working on it.

If I hadn’t just successfully got that back on the road, I never would have bought this barn find and tried to get it running. I’ve only had metric bikes in the past and never did much more than basic maintenance on them, so I had minimal experience with motorcycle mechanics prior to this year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 ·
Jim, make sure to read the manual when putting the front wheel back on. The hole in the axle is for a reason, it sets depth in the fork by using a specific size rod (or drill bit).
Ok great point, thank you. I’ll look that up when I get the wheels back.

I’m concerned about the rear brake assembly too, when I get the rear wheel on. I have no experience with disc brakes or their adjustment.
 

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Ok great point, thank you. I’ll look that up when I get the wheels back.

I’m concerned about the rear brake assembly too, when I get the rear wheel on. I have no experience with disc brakes or their adjustment.
Disk brakes are purty much self adjusting. So long as you have them assembled properly and bled properly. Make sure nothing is binding and follow the book. Easy peasy!

Make certain you use the correct DOT fluid! (that's the biggy) Use new fluid from a factory sealed container. (If the tinfoil seal is ruptured when you remove the cap from the brake fluid bottle. Just toss it out and get new. Brake fluid will adsorb water from the air. So a non sealed container is bad from the get go. After completing your brake bleed, toss out any left over fluid. This way you will have to go get new (fresh) fluid if the brakes need more fluid in the future. Never keep old brake fluid! Just because it might tempt you to think "it might still be okay".... It's NOT!

The ABS bikes are hell-a-lot more complicated and require factory special equipment to bleed the brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
Disk brakes are purty much self adjusting. So long as you have them assembled properly and bled properly. Make sure nothing is binding and follow the book. Easy peasy!
Ok, good, that’s a relief.
Make certain you use the correct DOT fluid! (that's the biggy) Use new fluid from a factory sealed container. (If the tinfoil seal is ruptured when you remove the cap from the brake fluid bottle. Just toss it out and get new. Brake fluid will adsorb water from the air. So a non sealed container is bad from the get go. After completing your brake bleed, toss out any left over fluid. This way you will have to go get new (fresh) fluid if the brakes need more fluid in the future. Never keep old brake fluid! Just because it might tempt you to think "it might still be okay".... It's NOT!

The ABS bikes are hell-a-lot more complicated and require factory special equipment to bleed the brakes.
I already picked up a bottle of DOT 5 from the Harley dealership. The ‘91 was one of those years Harley used DOT 5. I also ordered speed bleeders for it, and I already have the tubes and bleeder bag for working on my Honda. That said, I still hate bleeding brakes.
 

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Ok, good, that’s a relief.

I already picked up a bottle of DOT 5 from the Harley dealership. The ‘91 was one of those years Harley used DOT 5. I also ordered speed bleeders for it, and I already have the tubes and bleeder bag for working on my Honda. That said, I still hate bleeding brakes.
Me too! But, i'm a hydraulic tech! :ROFLMAO::p
 
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Thanks Cyclelane, that reminded me:
Brianin, make sure to clean the pistons well. Grime builds up on the boot, as it gets retracted it pulls all the crud into the crevices. Be careful to keep the pistons from pressing all the way out. If they do, you will need a brake caliper rebuild kit.
Wright or wrong, the way i do it:
Remove the brake caliper from the frame (leaving the brake hose attached to the caliper and the rest.) Remove the pads from the caliper. Then scrub it with a fairly stiff dry brush. Use one of the old brake pads as a stop between the pistons and carefully extend the pistons by operating the foot brake by hand... EASY DOES IT! Just get the pistons to extend enough so that you can clean the boots surrounding the pistons. Scrub lightly with the brush then rinse it all down with brake cleaner. Press the pistons back in by hand (careful again, press one in, the other tries to climb out) Ease both back into their recess then install the new pads, clips and retention screw (the long one at the end). I clean one of the old pads and use it to keep the new pads separated; so i can apply the brake firmly and check for leaks before putting the caliper back on the disk. The old pad also creates a mini wedge to press the new pads apart.
Hope that makes some kind on sense... o_O

At any rate, clean the rubber boots. So the brake won't fail to let go of the disk when you release the brake pedal.
A stuck piston is a real bear to get off the disk! Not to mention the frozen wheel that goes with it.

Edit:
Remember to break in the new brake pads! Try to prevent hard braking for the first 50 to 100 miles or so. (City riding) so you are using the brakes but, gently.

Most manufactures say that brake break in is not a necessity.. I disagree! Error on the side of safety! Or why put brakes on in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #89 ·
Thanks Cyclelane, that reminded me:
Brianin, make sure to clean the pistons well. Grime builds up on the boot, as it gets retracted it pulls all the crud into the crevices. Be careful to keep the pistons from pressing all the way out. If they do, you will need a brake caliper rebuild kit.
Wright or wrong, the way i do it:
Remove the brake caliper from the frame (leaving the brake hose attached to the caliper and the rest.) Remove the pads from the caliper. Then scrub it with a fairly stiff dry brush. Use one of the old brake pads as a stop between the pistons and carefully extend the pistons by operating the foot brake by hand... EASY DOES IT! Just get the pistons to extend enough so that you can clean the boots surrounding the pistons. Scrub lightly with the brush then rinse it all down with brake cleaner. Press the pistons back in by hand (careful again, press one in, the other tries to climb out) Ease both back into their recess then install the new pads, clips and retention screw (the long one at the end). I clean one of the old pads and use it to keep the new pads separated; so i can apply the brake firmly and check for leaks before putting the caliper back on the disk. The old pad also creates a mini wedge to press the new pads apart.
Hope that makes some kind on sense... o_O

At any rate, clean the rubber boots. So the brake won't fail to let go of the disk when you release the brake pedal.
A stuck piston is a real bear to get off the disk! Not to mention the frozen wheel that goes with it.

Edit:
Remember to break in the new brake pads! Try to prevent hard braking for the first 50 to 100 miles or so. (City riding) so you are using the brakes but, gently.

Most manufactures say that brake break in is not a necessity.. I disagree! Error on the side of safety! Or why put brakes on in the first place.
Ok thanks Scott. I hadn’t even thought of replacing the old pads, as they only have 10,000 miles on them. But since everything is already apart and these pads are 31 years old, it only makes sense to do it now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 ·
One thing worth checking is that pistons on the calipers are free and not seized as it's been standing for a while, also check there's no leaks from the piston seals. Good luck.
Good advice. After I get everything back together I’m going to have a competent bike mechanic double check all my work - brakes, axle assembly, rear shock assemblies, everything, while they do the state inspection. Hopefully they can catch anything I screw up 😬
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
Since I replaced the original rear shocks with the used Progressive shocks I was given, there are spaces between the top and bottom of the shocks and the bolts/nuts that hold them in place. The diameter of the spacers on the bolts is correct, but not their width sitting on their respective mounting bolts.

Are there specific bushings or some kind of spacers to make up the difference, or do I just use multiple washers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 ·
Since I replaced the original rear shocks with the used Progressive shocks I was given, there are spaces between the top and bottom of the shocks and the bolts/nuts that hold them in place. The diameter of the spacers on the bolts is correct, but not their width sitting on their respective mounting bolts.

Are there specific bushings or some kind of spacers to make up the difference, or do I just use multiple washers?
To clarify:
Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bicycle tire Vehicle Bicycle part


I certainly could just stack up washers but is there another option? Do I need shorter bolts?
 

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Ok thanks Scott. I hadn’t even thought of replacing the old pads, as they only have 10,000 miles on them. But since everything is already apart and these pads are 31 years old, it only makes sense to do it now.
Those old pads should work just fine. No need to put the $ in new pads. You can still set the piston stop using a pad and then use a screwdriver shank in lew of the extra pad when pressing.

To clarify:
View attachment 816937

I certainly could just stack up washers but is there another option? Do I need shorter bolts?
I can't give a solid answer because of the difference in age of the bikes. But i would verify what you have with the drawings in the manual or online.

From this pic, it appears you are missing item #3 and #16.

Just for reference, here's how the mount looks on a 2017:
Household hardware Bicycle part Nickel Gas Rim
 
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Discussion Starter · #95 ·
I can't give a solid answer because of the difference in age of the bikes. But i would verify what you have with the drawings in the manual or online.

From this pic, it appears you are missing item #3 and #16.

Just for reference, here's how the mount looks on a 2017:
View attachment 816938
Thanks for your making the effort to locate the diagram. That makes sense. And I’ll double check it in my factory service manual.

Is there usually a spacer(s) on the lower shock stud, or just the upper?
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 · (Edited)
Well, this barn find story continues to be “too good to be true,” even to me. I sold the side car right away, but the Tow Pac InstaTrike kit has been for sale on Facebook Marketplace since I brought the Sportster home.

This week a disabled guy out of state contacted me who desperately wanted the trike kit because he broke his back and can’t steady his 2003 Sportster, and my trike kit is a direct fit for his 2003.

Problem is, he’s on disability and has no cash. And can’t currently drive and has no way to get here.

But … he asked if I would be willing to take a 1980 Sportster 1000 with clear title in trade, if I would deliver the trike kit to him? It runs but needs some rewiring completed.
Tire Wheel Fuel tank Vehicle Automotive lighting

It will be a 750 mile round trip to go get it so I’d be investing my time, a couple tanks of gas, and the cost of a UHaul motorcycle rental.

But I was only asking $500 for the trike kit so this seems like a no brainer. Any reason not to take this trade?
 

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Well, this barn find story continues to be “too good to be true,” even to me. I sold the side car right away, but the Tow Pac InstaTrike kit has been for sale on Facebook Marketplace since I brought the Sportster home.

This week a disabled guy out of state contacted me who desperately wanted the trike kit because he broke his back and can’t steady his 2003 Sportster, and my trike kit is a direct fit for his 2003.

Problem is, he’s on disability and has no cash. And can’t currently drive and has no way to get here.

But … he asked if I would be willing to take a 1980 Sportster 1000 with clear title in trade, if I would deliver the trike kit to him? It runs but needs some rewiring completed.
View attachment 817442
It will be a 750 mile round trip to go get it so I’d be investing my time, a couple tanks of gas, and the cost of a UHaul motorcycle rental.

But I was only asking $500 for the trike kit so this seems like a no brainer. Any reason not to take this trade?

No you can never have to many Harley's Go for it. Like you said it's just your time and gas money plus Haul rental.
 

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Any pros or cons of that era Sportster 1000?
No negatives that i know of. I put a 03 back on the road after it had been in storage for 13 years.
The only real issue i had with it was the oil light was on and would not go off for love nor money. I finally routed in a new wire from the oil pressure switch to the lamp. (bypassing the oem wire) and it worked as advertised.

Otherwise just the normal sumping issues and trying to clean up the gummy carb. All the "normal chit".

The pro's: 2003 is the 100th Anniversary of Harley Davidson... So there's that!
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 ·
No negatives that i know of. I put a 03 back on the road after it had been in storage for 13 years.
The only real issue i had with it was the oil light was on and would not go off for love nor money. I finally routed in a new wire from the oil pressure switch to the lamp. (bypassing the oem wire) and it worked as advertised.

Otherwise just the normal sumping issues and trying to clean up the gummy carb. All the "normal chit".

The pro's: 2003 is the 100th Anniversary of Harley Davidson... So there's that!
I’m sorry, I wasn’t clear. He wants my Tow Pac trike kit for on his 2003 Sportster.

He wants to trade me a 1980 Sportster 1000 for my Tow Pac trike kit.

So I’m wondering if there are any known problems with the 1980 Sportsters to look out for.
 
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