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With all the chaos in the world, I've noticed a resurgence of the Peace Symbol on pins, tshirts, decals, etc.

But, I've found that very few people know it's origins or how the symbol was designed.

Back in the '60s, there was a push for global nuclear disarmament and the "Ban the Bomb" symbol was designed. It has since become known as the peace symbol. It is made up from two letters in semaphore, a system of communications using two flags to represent letters and numbers. Each letter is represented by a unique placement of the two flags. Semaphore has been used by the military since the 19th century and still has limited use in the Navy.

The symbol for the letter "N" is: (think nuclear)


The symbol for the letter "D" is: (think disarmament)


Combine the two to represent Nuclear Disarmament and you get:


Ta da !!!
 

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Fla Cajun
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Mr. MojoRisen
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Not really, if you go back far enough.

In "The Swastika," Folklore, Vol. 55, No. 4 (Dec., 1944), pp. 167-168, W. G. V. Balchin says the word swastika is of Sanskrit origin and the symbol is one of good luck or a charm or a religious symbol (the last, among the Jains and Buddhists) that goes back to at least the Bronze Age. It appears in various parts of the ancient and modern world. This article mentions Christians did, indeed, consider the swastika for their symbol.

Found this on ancienthistory.about.com

But as we all know, it was used as a symbol of some crazy ass follks in the 30's and early 40's. And now, no matter what it meant before, it will always be thought of as the nazi symbol.
JP, alot of poeple may have an issue with rocking this one. Some will not, but they are di(kheads.
 

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Fla Cajun
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Well, yes, but .......

:nah.....thats a symbol of good also....

The word swastika came from the Sanskrit word, meaning any lucky or auspicious object, and in particular a mark made on persons and things to denote auspiciousness, or any piece of luck or well-being.

It is composed of su- meaning "good, well" and asti "to be". Suasti thus means "well-being." The suffix -ka either forms a diminutive or intensifies the verbal meaning, and suastika might thus be translated literally as "that which is associated with well-being," corresponding to "lucky charm" or "thing that is auspicious."[2] The word in this sense is first used in the Harivamsa. The Ramayana does have the word, but in an unrelated sense of "one who utters words of eulogy".

The most traditional form of the swastika's symbolization in Jainism is that the four arms of the swastika remind us that during the cycles of birth and death we may be born into any one of the four destinies: heavenly beings, human beings, animal beings, (including birds, bugs, and plants) and hellish beings. Our aim should be the liberation and not the rebirth. To show how we can do this, the swastika reminds us that we should become the pillars of the four fold Jain Sangh, then only can we achieve liberation. The four pillars of the Jain Sangh are sädhus, sädhvis, shrävaks, and shrävikäs. This means that first, we should strive to be a true shrävaks or shrävikäs, and when we can overcome our social attachments, we should renounce the worldly life and follow the path of a sädhu or sädhvi to be liberated.

The most traditional form of the swastika's symbolization in Hinduism is that the symbol represents the purusharthas: dharma (that which makes a human a human), artha (wealth), kama (desire), and moksha (liberation). All four are needed for a full life. However, two (artha and kama) are limited and can give only limited joy. They are the two closed arms of the swastika. The other two are unlimited and are the open arms of the swastika.

The Mahabharata has the word in the sense of "the crossing of the arms or hands on the breast". Both the Mahabharata and the Ramayana also use the word in the sense of "a dish of a particular form" and "a kind of cake". The word does not occur in Vedic Sanskrit. As noted by Monier-Williams in his Sanskrit-English dictionary, according to Alexander Cunningham, its shape represents a monogram formed by interlacing of the letters of the auspicious words su-astí (svasti) written in Ashokan characters.[3]





Hindu child with head shaven and red Svastika painted on it. Upanayana is a very popular Hindu-tradition, a Samskara or Sanskar (consecration).
The Sanskrit term has been in use in English since 1871, replacing gammadion (from Greek γαμμάδιον). Alternative historical English spellings of the Sanskrit phonological words with different meanings to include suastika, swastica, and svastica.

Folks think Nazi when they see a swastika, or the SS lightning bolts. But both were stolen and were symbols of good.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
@zeta7. That may be, but I wouldn't put it on my car's back window, if I were you.
 

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Fla Cajun
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@zeta7. That may be, but I wouldn't put it on my car's back window, if I were you.
Why?...i have a cracker bolt tattoo, also known as ss lighting bolts.
 

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Worked hard all my lifetime,
no help from my friends,
 

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Glad to be anywhere
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I'm going from a bit of info I learned about 30 years ago so I may be wrong but that symbol was also used by some American Indians and a philanthropic society based in Wheaton IL. I can't remember their name but they are a force ofmgood based on spiritualism.

They and the other groups except for the nazis have the arms of the "wheel" going the other direction. The nazi version was separate from those of good intention.
 

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I remember now. The Theosophical Scociety. One of the founder was Madam Blansky (sp?). And one named Olcot (sp?).

It's been awhile.

I've visited their campus. It's like going back in time to the mid'1800's to early 1900's. It is interesting.
 

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Indian Larry
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I remember now. The Theosophical Scociety. One of the founder was Madam Blansky (sp?). And one named Olcot (sp?).

It's been awhile.

I've visited their campus. It's like going back in time to the mid'1800's to early 1900's. It is interesting.
WOW!!!
(I just thought it was the Mercedes logo!)
 

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PS
Upon further research there were good intentioned groups before the nazis that had the arms going the same way including your excellent discussion on groups in India. Sanscrit, Hindus and Buddhists.

And there were groups using the arms going the other way as I mentioned (Greeks, American Indians - both ways and the Theosophical society, that were not genocidal maniacs.
 

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Alberta Strong
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HistoryoftheSwastika

Swastikas at a Hindu temple, India
Hindu temple, India. (Credit)

The swastika has held a place of great importance in India and Asia for thousands of years, and is widely used by Hindus, Jains and Buddhists.
The swastika is to be seen everywhere across the Indian sub-continent: sculptured into temples both ancient and modern, decorating buildings, houses, shops, painted onto public buses, in taxis - even decorating the dashboards of the three-wheeler motor rickshaws. Many religious and spiritual books display the symbol. It may well be the most prevalent symbol one will see in India.
However, the swastika is not limited to India and Asia. Evidence suggests that the swastika was in use in many other cultures too. For example: •The ancient city of Troy, in the northwest of present-day Turkey•The Iron Age Koban culture of the Caucasus in Asia minor•On prehistoric Vinca artefacts from South-Eastern Europe•Amongst the ancient Hittites who lived in the area of present day Syria•In Ein Gedi, near Israel's Dead Sea•In the Tang Dynasty of China•In the 13th Century Amiens Cathedral in France•In ancient Greek architectural designs•On Native American Indian artefacts including those of the Navajo and Hopi•On pre-Christian Anglo-Saxon and Druidic artefacts
The Edmonton Swastikas, a Canadian womens' ice hockey team, c.1916
The Edmonton Swastikas, a Canadian womens' ice hockey team, c.1916. (Credit)

The swastika was also used widely in the pre-Nazi twentieth century: •Dust-covers of books by Rudyard Kipling and other authors•Boy Scouts' badges in Britain from 1911 to 1922•Bank notes printed by the 1917 Russian Provisional Government•Emblem of the British National War Savings Committee•Planes of the Finnish Air force and Army from 1918 until 1944•Latvian Air Force, 1918 until 1934•The Icelandic Steamship Company, Eimskip, from 1914•The Theosophical Society, founded in New York in 1875
 
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