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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Got a new smoker, pretty inexpensive, very nice size and quality and meets some special requirements,

one being that my wife doesn't like smoked stuff at all, it's a propane slow cooker if I don't add wood,

I can do a 1 hour smoke for part of a batch, and then no smoke for the second half of the batch for slow cook

maybe satisfy her wish for some no-smoke brisket or whatever. Not likely but I'll try.

Question for tinkerers, customizers, and inventioneers is what would a DIY'er use for thin high temp insulation?

The door is double wall has a couple of holes up high, I might pour it full of some granular insulation like vermiculite,

sides and top are single wall black steel cabinet, I have in mind insulating the sides, like the Green Egg slow cookers,

the inside of a cooker needs to be hot but the outside does not. I'm about to do a thin sheet aluminum liner

I want at least a thin layer of something between the two sheets of metal, can't be thicker than heavy or thin cloth

on the sides because I still have to bolt racks thru whatever I thicken the walls with. Can anybody think of anything

cheap and readily available and thin that is a better idea than fiberglass cloth for body work?

Anybody think fiberglass cloth might not really be all glass? It would suck if it smokes at 400 degrees.

$129 delivered. Sears memorial day sale. A week later it's $165 :thumb








Now if only I knew somebody who needed wild hogs cleared from their property..

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Rock wool would be better for insulating in that application than fiberglass.


Rock wool is stranded rock, commonly used in sound proofing applications, but it's composition makes it an excellent high heat insulator.

Stone wool is a furnace product of molten rock at a temperature of about 1600 °C, through which a stream of air or steam is blown. More advanced production techniques are based on spinning molten rock on high speed spinning wheels somewhat like the process used to prepare cotton candy. The final product is a mass of fine, intertwined fibres with a typical diameter of 6 to 10 micrometers. Mineral wool may contain a binder, often food grade starch, and an oil to reduce dusting.
Mineral wool - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Discussion Starter #3
Rock wool would be better for insulating in that application than fiberglass.


Rock wool is stranded rock, commonly used in sound proofing applications, but it's composition makes it an excellent high heat insulator.
Well crap. You're right, Brian. I had myself thinking that fiberglass was just another way of packaging "mineral wool"

but your Wikipedia link led me to check mineral wool against fiberglass and I see there is just a touch of some binding agent,

I'm not sure I want to bet this material will never see more than 400F/200C, or that it won't smoke if it does.

I need to find a source for a thin mineral wool thin mat, fireplace and wood-stove supply maybe..

The cohesion and mechanical strength of the product is obtained by the presence of a binder that “cements” the fibers together. Ideally, a drop of bonder is placed at each fiber intersection. This fiber mat is then heated to around 200 °C to polymerize the resin and is calendered to give it strength and stability
 

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Earthbound misfit, I
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I have a different type of smoker and I lined it with ordinary red building bricks, only around the inside walls though as mine is a top loading type. It did make a big difference.

Most everything we eat comes off the smoker. I couldn't live without it anymore.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Discussion Starter #5
So, I used the new smoker this afternoon, it seems maybe

I should have tried this before planning to insulate the box...

It appears that as it is, there is no burner heat setting low enough

to get the internal temp below about 230.... :eek

That's kinda hot as the lowest possible setting for a smoker. Hmmmm...

If the cabinet was insulated this high temp issue would have been much worse.

My plan, and the burner control, may both need some adjustment. :think...


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I had one just like it and it was impossible to regulater the teperature but I still got some good smoked shoulders and turkeys from it. The problem is you are constantly adjusting the temp and have to stay with it. The inslulation should help, and sealing the door. I just gave up and bought a Bradley Smoker. Set the temp, time and load it with wafers and leave it.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Discussion Starter #7
I'm sure I can get the flame turned way down, my son recently loaned me

the high pressure regulator from his turkey fryer for another cooker issue,

but I see a feature that should allow me to turn that minimujm flame level waay down





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Don't open the gas valve on the tank all the way open. You can regulate the flame down this way.

I have a similar smoker only mine is electric. Mine is insulated between two plates of thin steel. I can get the temps down to about 100 degrees, but it won't light the chips so I have to usea torch to get them started.
 

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You know .... cardboard doesn't begin to burn until 450 degrees F.

I've cooked roasts, baked pies and prepared a variety of other foods in cheap cardboard solar powered ovens, on a good summer day I found I could get and maintain 435 degrees F.

Why you ask? Because I read about it and wanted to play with the idea, and yes it works just fine.

If you really are staying at 400 you could use cardboard or a host of other materials for insulation. The problem is you probably have the potential to get hotter than that and Murphy's law would generally apply.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Discussion Starter #11
How long for corn-on-the-cob?

My smoker holds 210 or 220, thereabouts pretty consistently,

if I'm doing corn-on-cob and onions and peppers etc. how long in the smoke,

then wrapped and held in the heat for how long? With husk on or off ?

??
 

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I've never tried onions and peppers, but I do corn all the time in my smoker.

My method:

1) Peel the husk down, but leave as much of it as possible attached.
2) Remove as much silk as possible.
3) Rub a light coating of olive oil over the kernels.
4) Sprinkle on some kosher salt and fresh ground pepper.
5) Re-wrap the cobs in their husks, and tie the tops shut with some kitchen twine.
6) Smoke at around 225 for about an hour to an hour and a half.

I like to use a mixture of oak and hickory for my smoke wood. Also, keep in mind I use a charcoal fired smoker, not a propane one, so you may need to play around with this to get it where you like it on your setup.
 

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avoider of idiots
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nathang,
hope this doesn't get me a reprimand, but, have you ever looked at a website called the smoke ring? if you are into outdoor cooking, you need to check it out. it's pretty cool:cool
regards,
dave
 
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