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On a ride
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None that I can think of. Have done it for years here after polluting the bike on a sloppy winter's day ride. Very therapeutic. And if your garage is cold, just park a small electric space heater near the bike and enjoy the time going over the bike.
 

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Just passing thru
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My opinion is not based on science but it seems to me that with the colder temps the wax seems to adhere in a thicker layer making for an even better job, not to mention no sweating. After a few minutes polishing you wont be cold anymore. So now you have no excuse Lil. ;)
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Now if the question was about turning wrenches in cold weather....
Damn, a couple of hours handling wrenches that are cold will make my hands ache.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Now if the question was about turning wrenches in cold weather....
Damn, a couple of hours handling wrenches that are cold will make my hands ache.
Is it smart to turn wrenches on cold metal in winter? Is increased metal fragility an issue?
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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At liquid nitrogen temps, nearing absolute 0, I believe there is increased brittleness, but that said, I don't know how they can store liquid nitrogen at extreme pressures without the vessel becoming brittle.

Since metals in use are subjected to more forces and stresses than metals being wrenched on, if metal was that susceptible to cold, you couldn't use vehicles at 60 below. Imagine the stresses on railroad rails in Siberia
Or on the the vehicles used on the moon or in deep space at much colder temps.

Commercial aircraft fly at 30 and 40 below every day.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
At liquid nitrogen temps, nearing absolute 0, I believe there is increased brittleness, but that said, I don't know how they can store liquid nitrogen at extreme pressures without the vessel becoming brittle.

Since metals in use are subjected to more forces and stresses than metals being wrenched on, if metal was that susceptible to cold, you couldn't use vehicles at 60 below. Imagine the stresses on railroad rails in Siberia
Or on the the vehicles used on the moon or in deep space at much colder temps.

Commercial aircraft fly at 30 and 40 below every day.
Well then, you educated me with a good answer! Thank you!

It is amazing how easy it is to ignore the obvious.
 
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