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When I leave work, I literally pull from our parking lot onto a 4 lane highway. I take it easy, shift around 3k while using as little throttle as possible to do so. Ride for a couple of miles at 60-65mph which can be a bit exciting as the speed limit is 75. What is the best procedure to use to warm it up without stressing a cold engine? Should I be doing something different?
 

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Let it idle in your garage/parking spot for 3-4 minutes? Once the rocker boxes are warm to the touch you are good.
 

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I {Heart} Hookers.
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When I leave work, I literally pull from our parking lot onto a 4 lane highway. I take it easy, shift around 3k while using as little throttle as possible to do so. Ride for a couple of miles at 60-65mph which can be a bit exciting as the speed limit is 75. What is the best procedure to use to warm it up without stressing a cold engine? Should I be doing something different?
You're fine. TC engine's don't have to sit and idle like Evo engines did. Keeping it under 3K is a good proactice, until 10 minutes or until it's warm.

Harley engine's (Cylinders) "grow", as the engine warms due to metal expansion. Becuase of this, the tappets are hydraulic, to be able to "self adjust" as the valve clearence changes, because the pushrod length (lash) changes.

Because of this "Growing" phase, max head torque isn't reached until the engine is at full temp.

If you redline a cold Evo engine, you could blow head gaskets. A fool redlines a cold engine, Evo, Lawn mower or Vespa.

Oil's ability to reach certain vital areas while cold is an issue, but not so much with a roller bearing engine, vs a babbit bearing car/truck engine.
 

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You're fine. TC engine's don't have to sit and idle like Evo engines did. Keeping it under 3K is a good proactice, until 10 minutes or until it's warm.



Harley engine's (Cylinders) "grow", as the engine warms due to metal expansion. Becuase of this, the tappets are hydraulic, to be able to "self adjust" as the valve clearence changes, because the pushrod length (lash) changes.



Because of this "Growing" phase, max head torque isn't reached until the engine is at full temp.



If you redline a cold Evo engine, you could blow head gaskets. A fool redlines a cold engine, Evo, Lawn mower or Vespa.



Oil's ability to reach certain vital areas while cold is an issue, but not so much with a roller bearing engine, vs a babbit bearing car/truck engine.

I always redline Vespas. Because eff them.
 

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I {Heart} Hookers.
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Let it idle in your garage/parking spot for 3-4 minutes? Once the rocker boxes are warm to the touch you are good.
What temp is warm to the touch?
I rolled Lucille out the garage this morning and the temp was 94.
Close enough?
Damn heat and condensation in the garage

:think

FB
 

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I {Heart} Hookers.
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Someone once said that if it's an EFI, they let it warm up for as long as it takes to put on a jacket, gloves and helmet. They say you don't need to warm up an EFI like a carbed bike.
 

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:loco
 

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Someone once said that if it's an EFI, they let it warm up for as long as it takes to put on a jacket, gloves and helmet. They say you don't need to warm up an EFI like a carbed bike.
The EFI systems will make a cold engine drive off like its already warmed up. Too bad internals are still trying to normalize. Has to increase wear on engine. IMOP
 

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I {Heart} Hookers.
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The EFI systems will make a cold engine drive off like its already warmed up. Too bad internals are still trying to normalize. Has to increase wear on engine. IMOP
Actually better. Warm engine runs at 14.7:1 ratio. Cold engine runs at 12:1 ratio. My bike runs great cold.....:D
 

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Someone once said that if it's an EFI, they let it warm up for as long as it takes to put on a jacket, gloves and helmet. They say you don't need to warm up an EFI like a carbed bike.[/QUOT

That is because the mapping/sensors adjust the fuel air mix automatically for the bike to run smooth. The Carb bikes have a choke inrichener ( know I spelled that wrong) and that is why they are pulled out and sometimes as the motor heats up they are slowly pushed back in. Old Cars had chokes, then automatic chokes and then like today controlled fuel injection. Those old automatic chokes were nothing but a thermostat coil with a rod attached to open the carb butterfly as they heated up just like the old manual thermostats in your home that moved the temp indicator arrow. I can not remember ever reading about warming an engine to protect oil flow. The only good think I ever read was start the engine and start driving right away but slowly at first. Don't let an engine just idle. Usually a cold engine will idle too fast sitting still with no load.
 

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Actually better. Warm engine runs at 14.7:1 ratio. Cold engine runs at 12:1 ratio. My bike runs great cold.....:D
Too bad those pesky smog settings get in way, thanks EPA. On a cool day my oil temp may only get up about 170-180 per. oil tank thermometer. But engine is running strong.:thumbsup
 

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Someone once said that if it's an EFI, they let it warm up for as long as it takes to put on a jacket, gloves and helmet. They say you don't need to warm up an EFI like a carbed bike.[/QUOT

That is because the mapping/sensors adjust the fuel air mix automatically for the bike to run smooth. The Carb bikes have a choke inrichener ( know I spelled that wrong) and that is why they are pulled out and sometimes as the motor heats up they are slowly pushed back in. Old Cars had chokes, then automatic chokes and then like today controlled fuel injection. Those old automatic chokes were nothing but a thermostat coil with a rod attached to open the carb butterfly as they heated up just like the old manual thermostats in your home that moved the temp indicator arrow. I can not remember ever reading about warming an engine to protect oil flow. The only good think I ever read was start the engine and start driving right away but slowly at first. Don't let an engine just idle. Usually a cold engine will idle too fast sitting still with no load.
Back in day in New York. Cars sitting out all nite in winter needed warmed up before they were drivable. Not to mention heater was not doing any thing till engine warmed up.
 

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During the warm summer no warm up is required. All other times of the year require a couple shots of brandy.
Too much Brandy will cause a stumble under sudden acceleration.
 
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