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The Fighting Chicken
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4,006 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just finished the install of my rear auxiliary input on my stock head unit. It was very basic the way I did it. Iron Cross Audio can do this for you if you aren't good with a soldering iron.

What I did-

Pull the head unit from the bike, if you can't do that, just stop here. :laugh

After pulling the head unit remove the rubber weather stripping. Then there are 2 T-8 Torx screws where the face plate meets the metal body, and the two T-25? screws on the back of the radio that hold the top on.



After the screws are pulled you can start releasing the 6 tabs that clip the face of the radio on. Be sure to pull it off square so you don't bend any of the pins that connect the display to the head unit.

You'll then see this-

 

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The Fighting Chicken
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4,006 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Then I pulled the cover that fills the gap where a GPS module would go and drilled a hole in it to accept a rubber grommet. I chose to put the grommet in this cover because I could get a new cover and remove all my wiring to make it appear stock again if I ever decide to do that. You could drill the hole almost anywhere in the rear of the head unit to stick the wires through.



Then I grabbed the female auxiliary port that I picked up from my local CB radio shop. The only problem with my port is it is a panel mounted jack so if I mount the jack in direct contact to metal it will ground to the frame. The stock head unit has an isolated ground (not just attached to the frame) so you don't want this thing grounding to the frame of your bike through contact with the auxiliary plug. I fixed that with some heat shrink.



At this point I had already strung the wires through the grommet.



Next up, use an ohm/continuity tester to find which wires of your new female port matches the old port. To do this I plugged a Male to male extension into the new port and found which wires went to each ring on the male side. The closest to the wire is the ground, which is the front right on the head unit's port. The next ring is the left side of the head unit's port. The last is the right side in the back. In my case Blue was ground (right front), white went on the left and red the right back.
 

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The Fighting Chicken
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4,006 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Now for the soldering. Again, if you can't solder two wires together this would be pretty advanced for you.



Attached wires here-



and here-





You can see the pick that I pointed to the traces on the circuit board. This is the trace you would cut in order to make your radio acknowledge that you always have a cable plugged into the bike even if you're not using it. Without either cutting this trace or letting something plugged into the stock port you can't select AUX while scrolling through the options on the radio like this-







So you can cut the trace, by cutting it with an EXACTO knife from the darker green, through the lighter green, to the next dark green area.



Shown here-



A key thing to remember is that the circuit board has stacked layers of traces. So if you cut too deep you can ruin other functions of the radio and you may have to send it to Iron Cross Audio to get it fixed. They fix a fair amount of them that people messed up on their own. Which is why I elected to use a different method to fool the radio into thinking I had a cord plugged into the front of the bike.



I made a pin out of 1/8" brazing rod that I polished and formed a nice ball on the end of it.







When you plug it in it spreads a contact apart which opens up the circuit telling the head unit that the radio has a cord plugged in. So when you push the pin in the aux port it will show the AUX function on the display.



 

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The Fighting Chicken
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4,006 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Now you can put your head unit back together and back in the bike and whatever you want to plug into the back of the unit will play through the speakers when you have your AUX selected.

I didn't stop here though.

I have a Rider's Claw iPhone handlebar mount. Since I use the riders claw for my iPhone's GPS and Music almost every time I ride I decided to hide the auxiliary cable inside the bars. I pulled the 30" cord through my bars with my switch wires as I was wiring my new Apes.

To get the cord to stick out of the switch housing I ground a small corner off the small side of the clutch mount. (no pic of the ground edge) The wire comes straight out the bottom of the clamp and is barely noticeable when the cord is tucked away.



I pulled enough cord out of the bars to plug my phone in while its in the riders claw.



The other end of the bars-



And the finished product plugged in!



I mentioned before that I didn't want the port to ground out so I covered the entire connection with heat shrink after plugging it in the last time before reinstalling the head unit.
 

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Breaker of Things
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Awesome job forty!!!
 

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Methhead
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Lost in Space
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When did they start putting audio on bikes? Never heard of that.

Great job ED.
 

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Breaker of Things
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Who the eff is forty? Forty is dead. You're speaking to El Diablo now!

My deepest apologies to you El Diablo!!!!
 
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