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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Discussion Starter #1
Does anybody have a reasonably accurate DIY method of getting the rear wheel on a LowRider true again after changing the tire? The manual's instruction to use a bent rod hooked in a hole to get accuracy within 1/32" is a joke.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Discussion Starter #2
BTW, if anybody ever had a moment of severe DIY determination, I have a method of safely breaking the bead on motorcycle wheels, with the typical garage inventory of junk, and if you can get the bead broken down you can unmount the old tire and mount the new tires by hand.

I have a couple of wide thick boards that I use to support the rim as broadly as possible under the point where I'm going to pull the tire off the rim. The wheel is at least as well supported as any wheel machine could do it, and the wood is as closer to being mar proof than anything in the tire shop.

I position the well supported rim and tire in a place near my car or truck wheel, I carefully put a board up on the tire to be removed, touching the rim, but for very sure not in a position to hang on it, and slowly drive the car tire/or/truck up the board and use the weight of the car to press down the tire until it pulls clear of the rim, or reposition everthing to repeat the attempt. I have broken the bead on everything from motorcycle tires to tractor tires to ATV to truck tire, and never damaged a rim.

Course, unless you're on a desert island, I can't say DIY mounting tires by hand is a real rewarding pass-time, that is unless you really hate having to have anything done at the dealership.
 

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Official Ass Tweaker
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STAND AND FIGHT!
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13,195 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Yup. That's the one. Thanks Pete.

I used that method 30 years ago, but couldn't quite remember the details.
I knew there was a string involved and the accuracy came from
exaggerating the discrepancy from square over a long distance.

Sweet.
I truly love having a low tech alternative to paying the stealership
to botch the job, ANY job.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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Discussion Starter #5
Well, that didn't work very well. I can't see the monofil line well enough.

I did find a decent substitute straight-edge tho.'
long enough. straight enough.
I had some burned out long flourescent tubes, worked pretty good.
 

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Assume your Swingarm is true (I know, a leap of faith) But measure from the axle to the rear of the swingarm on each side of the axle.

If you are hell bent on taking advantage of cheap internet suppliers for your tires, check out the no mar tire changer and static wheel balancer.

I use one, and find it's well worth the investment.

www.nomartirechanger.com

RJ
 

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COB
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1,984 Posts
Assuming the bike is in reasonable condition, you can simply measure from the axle to some point on the bike that works as a reference on both sides. Swingarm mounting bolt, edge of swingarm, etc.

edit: Or to the back like RJ says.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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13,195 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I came across the perfect DIY'er axle measurement tool, for the Dyna at least.

There is a small hole in the swingarm a couple of inchs in front of the axle,
and the axle itself has a self centering cone machined in it, that's supposed to be the measurement points.

This $7 "Giant Beam Compass" from Lowe's will allow the accurate mesurement from the axle center,
by use of a self centering tapered insert, a pencil, and the pointed probe.
 

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Livn' On Bonus Years
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155 Posts
Well, that didn't work very well. I can't see the monofil line well enough.

I did find a decent substitute straight-edge tho.'
long enough. straight enough.
I had some burned out long flourescent tubes, worked pretty good.
Yep... Flourescent tubes are much straighter than any wood. Just keep "Murphy's Law" in mind and be sure to wear safety glasses.
 

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Yep... Flourescent tubes are much straighter than any wood. Just keep "Murphy's Law" in mind and be sure to wear safety glasses.
Flourescent tubes contain mercury. Use caution and don't inhale any of that powder stuff when they break. You'll go mad as a hatter if you inhale that stuff for a week.
 

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Touch my monkey....
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471 Posts
Assume your Swingarm is true (I know, a leap of faith) But measure from the axle to the rear of the swingarm on each side of the axle.
Agreed. However, in order to adjust your rear axle, the wheel has to be loose to do it, and then retightening it will add to the mix of the "not perfect alignment" stew...

I personally use the 2 drilled holes in the swingarm, and a piece of coathanger, with a 90* bend on the end. I mark how deep to go in the swingarm and use the length to mark off where the "center" of the axle is, and repeat on the other side, as per the manual. Measuring from the end of the swingarm is basically the same thing...

I also count the total number of turns my adjuster screws turn in/out, and start with them to get the sides even. It's worked pretty well so far.

Taking into consideration Frame flex and swingarm flex, your alignment is ever changing, but with the belt drive, it's more forgiving, IMHO, then a chain. I try to get it as close as possible and then not think about it....;)



 
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