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:popcorn
 

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:draw
 

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Baby oil.

Love visiting Johnson & Johnson where they chuck those babies into the press to squeeze the oil outta them.

The looks on their mom's faces when they do that is classic. :D
 

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Amsoil :thumbsup:thumbsup
 

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Of all of the products that we use with our bikes, oil is something that virtually none of us can really tell if it is working better from one brand to another. We have no way to measure the various characteristics, if we even knew what these characteristics were.

There is no magic oil that has risen to the top, evidenced by how long engines lasted that were using it. Some engines using top of the line oils fail and others using basic mineral oils seem to go on forever.

Out of the oil vacuum have emerged oil cults - Amsoil, for example with a lot of incorrect and misleading information. Amsoil deliberately misleads it intended customers by citing a test that is designed to measure shear, something that counts a lot for transmissions and rear-ends but has virtually no value when testing engine oil.

Every manufacturer wants you to believe that their oil is the best. When in reality if they meed the spec for a particular usage, there really isn't much of a difference between any of the big name oils.

Do some oils have a small advantage over other oils, very likely they do. Red Line starts out with a 50w oil and mixes in additives to get it down to 20w when it is cold. Other oils like Mobile-1 start out with a 20w oil and include additives that get it up to 50w when it is hot. I use Red Line because, at least theoretically, it should hold up better on the high end than Mobile-1.

In the real world, engines running Mobile-1 hold up just as well as engines running Red Line. I have talked to Harley riders who have over 100k on their engines running Mobile-1 and I know one woman who has 140k+ on her Sportster and she uses nothing but non-synthetic oil.

For any of us to claim that we like a particular oil over another is a lot like saying that we would never buy any other ice cream but Borden's, but that we have never actually tasted it, yet we know that it is the best.

To obtain the optimal engine life from your bike, change the oil when recommended, more frequently when you ride in the winter. Use a good quality oil filter too and let the engine oil get up to operating temperature before flogging it.

Pete

I absolutely love the stuff, how bout any of you guys/gals? :cheers
 

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Baby oil.

Love visiting Johnson & Johnson where they chuck those babies into the press to squeeze the oil outta them.

The looks on their mom's faces when they do that is classic. :D
That is not even funny, Do you know how many babies it takes to get 3.5 quarts of oil? With the price of babies these days it will soon be non economical to use baby oil.
Personally I prefer Seal oil. Baby Snow seals to be specific. Much more economical due to their high fat content. Pound for pound a snow seal will beat your average baby every time. JMO
 

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Hmm, I don't know where the nearest snow seal oil factory is... :think

I hope I don't need to go all the way to Norway to take a tour!


(although it would be nice, if someone else footed the bill..... Norwegian girls :drool)
 

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Vapor Locked
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To obtain the optimal engine life from your bike, change the oil when recommended, more frequently when you ride in the winter. Use a good quality oil filter too and let the engine oil get up to operating temperature before flogging it.

Pete
I think Pete has hit it on the head.

Grampa Kracker
 

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Of all of the products that we use with our bikes, oil is something that virtually none of us can really tell if it is working better from one brand to another. We have no way to measure the various characteristics, if we even knew what these characteristics were.

There is no magic oil that has risen to the top, evidenced by how long engines lasted that were using it. Some engines using top of the line oils fail and others using basic mineral oils seem to go on forever.

Out of the oil vacuum have emerged oil cults - Amsoil, for example with a lot of incorrect and misleading information. Amsoil deliberately misleads it intended customers by citing a test that is designed to measure shear, something that counts a lot for transmissions and rear-ends but has virtually no value when testing engine oil.

Every manufacturer wants you to believe that their oil is the best. When in reality if they meed the spec for a particular usage, there really isn't much of a difference between any of the big name oils.

Do some oils have a small advantage over other oils, very likely they do. Red Line starts out with a 50w oil and mixes in additives to get it down to 20w when it is cold. Other oils like Mobile-1 start out with a 20w oil and include additives that get it up to 50w when it is hot. I use Red Line because, at least theoretically, it should hold up better on the high end than Mobile-1.

In the real world, engines running Mobile-1 hold up just as well as engines running Red Line. I have talked to Harley riders who have over 100k on their engines running Mobile-1 and I know one woman who has 140k+ on her Sportster and she uses nothing but non-synthetic oil.

For any of us to claim that we like a particular oil over another is a lot like saying that we would never buy any other ice cream but Borden's, but that we have never actually tasted it, yet we know that it is the best.

To obtain the optimal engine life from your bike, change the oil when recommended, more frequently when you ride in the winter. Use a good quality oil filter too and let the engine oil get up to operating temperature before flogging it.

Pete
IMHO Pete's post should be a "stickey" on the Oil forum.

I use Red Line but do not extend change intervals beyond what's recommended in my HD manual. My reasoning is that, while I can accept that synthetic base oils are up to extended service, there are things going on inside an air cooled motorcycle engine other than oil shearing (wearing out). These other things are not necessarily addressed by a tougher base oil but are addressed primarily by the oil's additives package, some of the contents of which are subject to depletion at varying rates depending upon individual riding circumstances. Also, the longer an oil remains in the engine, the more crap (particles) will be circulating in it. If you are among those who believe a 5 micron paper filter is trapping all particles larger than 5 microns, (I don't), be warned, those filters can allow even 100 micron particles to circulate on their best day. If you read up on some of the "nominal" filter rating procedures you'll discover they're a joke. They're not even useful as a comparative tool because the methods are not standardized.
 

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There is a great sticky in the Oil Forum from Kainam in 2011. Explains everything you could possibly want to know about OIL.
Although maybe we should get him to update it to include baby oil and snow seal oil :)
 

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KY Jelly.
 
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