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· weird member
2022 El Diablo, 1997 FXSTC
Joined
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4,571 Posts
I agree with wicking base layers. Make sure for winter, you're getting ones designed to be warm, usually made of a synthetic materal and especially look for "microfleeced" or "fleeced" in the description. Those go a long way.

I also agree with "buy once, cry once". Just bite the bullet and get heated gear, even if you have to buy it one piece per year, it's worth it. I put it off forever, just wearing multiple layers (microfleeced warming base layers, jeans, t-shirt, wool socks under cotton socks, thermal long sleeve shirt over t-shirt, vest, heavy winter jacket, leather overpants, warming sports gloves under leather gloves, etc).

Now with heated gear (I have First Gear heated gear, same gear as Warm-n-Safe, actually is made by them, even says so on the tag licensed to First Gear from Warm n Safe), it's way better. For one, all those thick layers makes moving around a pita and then if you stop in some place, you're boiling inside until you get back out riding. And then you're still cold at those temps (just less cold than without all the layers). With the heated gear, you have a lot more freedom of movement and comfort and you're actually warm rather than just "less cold". To be honest, I can't even stand to wear my heated gear if the ambient temperature is over about 55°F as it's too hot even on it's lowest setting, that's how warm the heated gear is. If you do heated gear, don't cheap out on it either with some cheap scAmazon rechargeable battery powered pieces of junk (they'll work, but only for about 10 minutes at which point they'll shut off for safety reasons and you have to stop to turn them back on).

I would add in though, get a sports balaclava to wear under your helmet and get a fleeced neck gaiter. You'll want both of those even with heated gear (or at least the balaclava).
 

· weird member
2022 El Diablo, 1997 FXSTC
Joined
·
4,571 Posts
That's another thing with heated gear... go for the socks, don't go for the insoles. The heated insoles, I would imagine based on limited experience (Amazon cheapo battery powered heated insoles), are way less efficient and helpful. The soles will only heat the bottom, socks ostensibly could heat the bottom AND top of the foot (though not sure, I need to look at the ones I have and see where the heating elements are, for all I know, they could only be on the bottom. I don't remember, only just got the stuff last year.
 

· weird member
2022 El Diablo, 1997 FXSTC
Joined
·
4,571 Posts
I went with heated glove liners instead of heated gloves. I already had gloves that were fine, now any gloves I have can be heated gloves. I have a very hard time finding gloves that fit right and didn't want to have to spend a bunch on heated gloves and adding yet another glove to the pile of gloves I have. The glove liners let me make any gloves I want to be heated. I can wear them under waterproof gloves to have heated gloves in the rain if need be without having to worry about glove covers for heated gloves. The glove liners cost less than the gloves too.
 

· weird member
2022 El Diablo, 1997 FXSTC
Joined
·
4,571 Posts
Never mind that nobody has yet mentioned the difference between a dry cold and a wet one. I can stand outside in NYC in the dead of winter with just a thin hoodie and be fine, but freezing to the bone in lower Alabama when the temperature is even 5° warmer while wearing heavier layers (although, if you're naked, a wet cold doesn't feel as cold as a dry cold, it gets inverted wearing clothes though, but cops and neighbors tend to frown on you running around in your birthday suit).

This is swamp-ass country where the air is so heavy it's sometimes hard to breath when it's 95°+ outside, and for the week it's cold here, it's still relatively moist.
 
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