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Discussion Starter #1
There is typically a good deal of salt on the roads up here in NY by the time the weather gets reasonable enough for a wimp like me to ride again. I've always been warned against taking it out until a real good soaking rain has washed things down.

What is your perspective?
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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IMHO that's exemplary caution, but totally unnecessary.

Salt is a problem on cars, because there are hundreds of hiding places, and acres of sheet metal, and a hundred feet of folded sheet metal seams, spot welded but not weathertight, these are all places for salt to get into and hide, causing corrosion eventually. A motorcycle has none of those hiding places, no folded spot-welded seams, hardly any sheet metal, period. You can clean and wipe every surface on a motorcycle, you cannot even see every surface on a car.
 

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......My Title......
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at times I'll not ride and say it's because of the salt on the roads (usually it's just too cold) but I have road when there is salt and I just make sure and give the bike a good wash afterwards, I wouldn't be too worried about it.
 

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The salt is not as worrisome to me as the sand that they also apply during winter. BEWARE OF THE SAND!
 

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Mentioning avoiding sand reminded me...
I tend to ride pretty frequently like it's a training exercise. Part of that practice involves wobbling around on the road some,
partly because I have some fear of becoming too stiff and immobile in my track, if I need to react flexibly. One of the things I am mindful of is road junk, or other problem debris that might come up fast because it's stopped and I'm moving. What I would do if I had to dramatically change my line when negociating a swooping curved and steeply inclined freeway ramp, especially since the chest high walls mean you can't see very far ahead of you.

On two different occasions, I swear, I was already thinking about practicing evasion maneuvers in one of these curved ramps, when a real hazard appeared, each time pretty unique. Both times I was on a down ramp, bike gaining speed if I let it. One risky time it was a freakin' chair in the way, something vaguely more like an armchair than a folding chair or a dining room chair, it was pretty big, right in my path, close to the left side of a long sweeping left turn, I was already thinking what I would do if I had to dodge something, and darned if it didn't seem pretty normal doing a 5ft zig to the right while already into a pretty deep lean in the curve. It might have startled me, and made me feel like I had limited options, if I hadn't already been more or less mentally practicing the maneuver.

The other amazingly similar incident was in exactly the same kind of freeway ramp, also a sharp left downhill sweeping concrete ditch, I was riding a bit higher and closer to the right edge than usual, it was the week after an ice storm, the hazard I engountered was a strip of sand about a foot wide and 4 inches deep, about thirty feet long not far off the car traffic's right wheel tracks. That time too, it seemed real casual doing a three foot zig to the left to get well clear of the sandy strip while already into a 45 degree lean, but I had already been wobbling around seeing how easy it was to accomplish something just like this same maneuver.
 

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I break stuff.
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The residue from salt is slippery... keep that in mind and adjust your riding style accordingly and you'll be fine.

As for damage, you would be surprised at how it will speed up the oxidation of aluminum, fade the black paint on your motor and pit your chrome. If you take your bike out, be sure to give it a good bath when you get it home.

Unless you're going for that 'beater' look, LOL!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The residue from salt is slippery... keep that in mind and adjust your riding style accordingly and you'll be fine.

As for damage, you would be surprised at how it will speed up the oxidation of aluminum, fade the black paint on your motor and pit your chrome. If you take your bike out, be sure to give it a good bath when you get it home.

Unless you're going for that 'beater' look, LOL!
Since a winter bath is out of the question because she'll turn to ice and because that beater look is the farthest thing from my mind, it looks like staying in storage is the way the Queen will spend winter.
 
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