Harley Davidson Forums banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
3,723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Before any of you start in with, "Just install the heel shift lever and be done with it." stuff, I will put pink hair scrunchies on my existing peg before I put a heel shifter on. Never used one, don't wanna use one, and don't wanna learn how at 62, lol.

That being said, I have an Arlen Ness Bevel Cut shifter peg on there right now.

As you can see, it's pretty agressive. I immediately took heat shrink tubing and built up the center part of the peg to make it a larger diameter than that really cool bevel cut end cap on it , which matches EVERYTHING on my bike, (which is why I bought it in the first place). Well, maybe I didn't build it up thick enough, or that end cap has an appetite for leather, or my foot is crooked, but either way, between that, and like 3 years and 90,000 miles, I need new boots. LOVE the Chippewa Logging Boots that I have, and going to get the same ones. But before I do, I want to get different results by doing things differently.

I just want to hear if you have had shifter pegs with teeth and swapped it out for something softer? Modified yours to work better? Found a peg that massages your leather boot with every up shift? Or something else? Thought about foam pipe insulation, but that might be too think and then crumble from dry rot later.

Anyhow, got any ideas?

MJ
 

· Registered
2014 Ultra Limited
Joined
·
685 Posts
Based on looking at the image from the link, there has to be something out there that can slip on or over the current surface to add thickness to the shift peg and still keep the ends visible. A quality piece of black rubber type tubing / hose from a hardware or farm store.
Know anyone handy with leather? Could also look at doing a lace on leather wrap to give you some thickness. I would think anything to get flush with the bevel edge is going to provide some protection to the boot.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Norm, I hadn't thought of some sort of leather product. But yeah, the concept is to keep the end cap exposed for my, (or your), viewing pleasure. Maybe I can find a leather guy down in the Central Valley that might be able to come up with something........ :unsure:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,567 Posts
This would be a easy to put a nice looking thick leather skin covering just the center barrel.

I would use a baseball stitch to close the leather firmly together.

But note; it will be slippery as goose chit, when wet.

You may put a stack of rubber O rings covering the center. They are much cheaper to replace than boots.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
5,567 Posts
Another way to keep it the same diameter as it is now:
Very carefully abrade the knurled portion with a wire brush then clean with acetone to prep it for carefully applied body puddy... Sand smooth, prime n paint. No more knurling!

One more way to lose the knurling: Anyone with a home lathe can turn the knurling off, or even take the high points off, resulting in a much less aggressive knurl. Followed by prime n paint.

You may to the above on a drill press / using sandpaper to cut the knurl. Make some kinda arbor for the threaded portion to chuck on.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Before any of you start in with, "Just install the heel shift lever and be done with it." stuff, I will put pink hair scrunchies on my existing peg before I put a heel shifter on. Never used one, don't wanna use one, and don't wanna learn how at 62, lol.

That being said, I have an Arlen Ness Bevel Cut shifter peg on there right now.

As you can see, it's pretty agressive. I immediately took heat shrink tubing and built up the center part of the peg to make it a larger diameter than that really cool bevel cut end cap on it , which matches EVERYTHING on my bike, (which is why I bought it in the first place). Well, maybe I didn't build it up thick enough, or that end cap has an appetite for leather, or my foot is crooked, but either way, between that, and like 3 years and 90,000 miles, I need new boots. LOVE the Chippewa Logging Boots that I have, and going to get the same ones. But before I do, I want to get different results by doing things differently.

I just want to hear if you have had shifter pegs with teeth and swapped it out for something softer? Modified yours to work better? Found a peg that massages your leather boot with every up shift? Or something else? Thought about foam pipe insulation, but that might be too think and then crumble from dry rot later.

Anyhow, got any ideas?

MJ
Agreed with the scrunchies, LOL. First thing I always do is remove the heel shifter. Me? I just use a more boot friendly shifter peg.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,403 Posts
Before any of you start in with, "Just install the heel shift lever and be done with it." stuff, I will put pink hair scrunchies on my existing peg before I put a heel shifter on. Never used one, don't wanna use one, and don't wanna learn how at 62, lol.



MJ
How do you know what those are?
🤣
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Is there a way to make it "free floating" ie; spins? That way you'd only have a dent, without abrasion on your boot.
Might be an added feature by using an extended length bolt and then double nutting, (also considered a great night by the way!!), the bolt so it doesn't clamp the shifter peg down to the lever. :unsure:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Breeze3at

· Registered
Joined
·
3,723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Another way to keep it the same diameter as it is now:
Very carefully abrade the knurled portion with a wire brush then clean with acetone to prep it for carefully applied body puddy... Sand smooth, prime n paint. No more knurling!

One more way to lose the knurling: Anyone with a home lathe can turn the knurling off, or even take the high points off, resulting in a much less aggressive knurl. Followed by prime n paint.

You may to the above on a drill press / using sandpaper to cut the knurl. Make some kinda arbor for the threaded portion to chuck on.
The knurled section is rubber and has not been the offender here. That was covered up with the heat shrink tubing out of the gate and not seen daylight since. Although, the "O"-Ring idea you mentioned might work if I can get some with a think enough cross section that once they're mounted it would give them a larger O.D. than that boot eating end cap. And, it wouldn't look half bad either!
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1/2 Ton

· Registered
Joined
·
3,723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok, so after glomming onto @1/2 Ton suggestion of using O-Rings, (thanks Scott!), and not finding the ones I wanted because of their cross section diameter being too small, I found these grommets at Ace Hardware today! I may/may not put some heat shrink on them, depending on how nasty they get in dirt and rain. Trimmed the outside ring of the last one down so as to show the Bevel Cut that Arlen Ness cut into it. Thinking this should protect my boots like I need, so time to go shopping, lol! Thanks for all the input fellers!


Automotive tire Tints and shades Auto part Metal Fashion accessory


Automotive tire Automotive wheel system Household hardware Coil spring Auto part
 

· Registered
Joined
·
1,348 Posts
When those grommets wear out, get a piece of Tygon tubing that just fits the barrel diameter and then put shrink sleeve over it. That will be sturdy enough to last a long time.
 
  • Like
Reactions: MotoJockey

· Registered
Joined
·
3,723 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Literally just ordered a new set of Chippewa Logging Boots, (5'-7" and NEED that 2" heel, lol!), like 5 minutes ago to replace the old ones! We'll see how my grommet modification works out. I MAY have to add a layer of heat shrink tubing, possibly, but we'll see........

Thanks for the suggestion T~S. Might end up going that way at some point.........
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top