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Bag or a hose, either works. The bag just makes it handy to dispose of the old fluid.
 

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old scoot coot
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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
I was wondering that as well, I don't like the sealant that you will be opening and closing. Rather it be 2 piece system. As it needs to be done a few times. Maybe it works well.
ak the coating on the speed bleeder is just a corrossion inhibitor, like putting antiseize on spark plug threads. the seal is in the tapered seat. the taper on the bleeder mates with a tapered seat and creates one of the most leak free seals known to man. the vacuum bleeder has a line which hooks to the bleeder valve when open the vacuum draws the old dirty fluid out to a waste receptacle. as you draw the old fluid out with the vacuum you add more fluid to the master cylinder the keep its level high enough to keep from getting low enough to suck air into the system. using a stock bleeder you have to reseat the valve every time you get up to add more fluid so the open bleeder doesn't let air back into the system. with a speed bleeder their is a check ball preventing air from getting back into the system, so you can leave it cracked open while you draw the dirty fluid out and replace it with new fluid. the stock bleeder valve has no check ball so it must be reseated each time you stop drawing old fluid out to add new. they both work but only having to open it and close it once the speed bleeder is much handier to use because you can watch the level in the master cylinder drop as you are drawing out the old dirty fluid and make sure to add fluid as necessary. the stock valve requires reseating every time you think you need to get up and check the master cyl. it's much faster and there is almost no chance of air being introduced the the system by a solo operator. the dirty fluid being drawn from the system you can see through the clear plastic line to the dump. when it clears up at the bleeder valve where it is attached you will see all the dirty has been displaced by the new clean fluid. phew, i think you knew all that already i just threw it in for those who don't know how easy it is to change fluid with a vacuum bleeder and keep air out of the system. i think the rub for you is the what you think of as sealant on the bleeder valve. the seal is effected when the two opposite tapers, the one on the bleeder and the other in the seat are tightned against each other. that is the seal and it can be opened and closed many many times and still seal very well. the, what could be thought of as sealant on the new bleeder is not a sealant at all. it's their to prevent electrolysis (corrossion) from occuring between two dissimilar metals. that might cause the threads to strip when loosening it later. i guess icould have just said the stuff on the bleeder is not there as a sealant but then i would have ignored the "why" which is important to inquiring minds like mine. i hope this helps. :p
 

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weird member
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Quick question,
If the bleeders work with a check valve, why do you need the bleeder bag? Why not just run a hose away from the front end and let it drain into a old oil jug or something??
The check should not allow air in the system.
You can, I have done that before. The bag isn't strictly necessary.

It's less about the bag and more about the hose that comes with it. That hose seals better than any brake bleeder attachment that I've ever tried, and lasts seems like damn near forever too.

Plus, the bag is handy if you're clumsy like I am. You accidentally kick the bag and it just goes across the floor, not tips over and spills all over the place.
 

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1998 Harley Davidson FXDL low rider " Dynasor"
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ak the coating on the speed bleeder is just a corrossion inhibitor, like putting antiseize on spark plug threads. the seal is in the tapered seat. the taper on the bleeder mates with a tapered seat and creates one of the most leak free seals known to man. the vacuum bleeder has a line which hooks to the bleeder valve when open the vacuum draws the old dirty fluid out to a waste receptacle. as you draw the old fluid out with the vacuum you add more fluid to the master cylinder the keep its level high enough to keep from getting low enough to suck air into the system. using a stock bleeder you have to reseat the valve every time you get up to add more fluid so the open bleeder doesn't let air back into the system. with a speed bleeder their is a check ball preventing air from getting back into the system, so you can leave it cracked open while you draw the dirty fluid out and replace it with new fluid. the stock bleeder valve has no check ball so it must be reseated each time you stop drawing old fluid out to add new. they both work but only having to open it and close it once the speed bleeder is much handier to use because you can watch the level in the master cylinder drop as you are drawing out the old dirty fluid and make sure to add fluid as necessary. the stock valve requires reseating every time you think you need to get up and check the master cyl. it's much faster and there is almost no chance of air being introduced the the system by a solo operator. the dirty fluid being drawn from the system you can see through the clear plastic line to the dump. when it clears up at the bleeder valve where it is attached you will see all the dirty has been displaced by the new clean fluid. phew, i think you knew all that already i just threw it in for those who don't know how easy it is to change fluid with a vacuum bleeder and keep air out of the system. i think the rub for you is the what you think of as sealant on the bleeder valve. the seal is effected when the two opposite tapers, the one on the bleeder and the other in the seat are tightned against each other. that is the seal and it can be opened and closed many many times and still seal very well. the, what could be thought of as sealant on the new bleeder is not a sealant at all. it's their to prevent electrolysis (corrossion) from occuring between two dissimilar metals. that might cause the threads to strip when loosening it later. i guess icould have just said the stuff on the bleeder is not there as a sealant but then i would have ignored the "why" which is important to inquiring minds like mine. i hope this helps. :p
Yes that was what I was wondering about the coating on threads and how many times you could crack it. It would help me as I do everthing alone. I get the corrosion inhibitor for dissimilar metals. Appreciate that info as that was my last bit of hesitancy. Replacing front brake lines, would make that job easier. Will get 3, 2F 1R. And I did want to know the why. On euro cages we would pressure bleed thru master at 10PSI. Quick and nice clean brake fluid every time. Ty :)
 

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old scoot coot
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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
To be honest, they're so easy and great, I don't understand why they aren't standard for motorcycles. It's infinitely easier than a bleeder pump, reverse bleeding, or any other way you want to do it.

Just make sure you get the speed bleeder bags too. The hose makes a perfect seal on mine, no need to put grease or zip ties on the end of the hose to make sure air doesn't come in.
if system is evacuated completey or partially like replacing a hose, it's easier to fill from bleeder screw up. this is easy and gets no air into the system. you cannot do this with a speed bleeder in place. a standard bleeder makes both methods possible.
 

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I know it might be a little extra work, but what if you saved the OEM bleeders and swapped them out for the Speed Bleeders when ever, (most likely rarely), you do a major repair on the brake lines and then just swap them back after the initial flush/bleed? Then a few pedal/lever pumps with the SB's and you're back in business for all your normal 2 year flushes? Take like 30 seconds per bleeder to swap? With tools already to go that is.......
 

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old scoot coot
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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I know it might be a little extra work, but what if you saved the OEM bleeders and swapped them out for the Speed Bleeders when ever, (most likely rarely), you do a major repair on the brake lines and then just swap them back after the initial flush/bleed? Then a few pedal/lever pumps with the SB's and you're back in business for all your normal 2 year flushes? Take like 30 seconds per bleeder to swap? With tools already to go that is.......
exactly, i would drain fluid, install std bleeder fill from bottom up and leave std bleeder there till next fluid change. makes life easy when you have both bleeders. :)
 

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When I do a full fluid change, I just use the speed bleeders. I just keep bleeding like normal until the fluid coming out goes from yellow to purple (DOT 5 fluid, not sure if or what color the others are dyed or what color they become when old). It doesn't take long. It's probably not quite as fast as a reverse bleed, but it's definitely much faster than traditional and at least as fast as vacuum, though for me probably faster than vacuum because my vacuum bleeder container is small and I have to stop halfway through and dump it (if it's a full fluid change).
 

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Even quicker if you remove the fluid from the M/C's and refill with fresh before you start. No sense pumping all that old fluid through the system.
 

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old scoot coot
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Even quicker if you remove the fluid from the M/C's and refill with fresh before you start. No sense pumping all that old fluid through the system.
yep, i dip it out with a teaspoon before starting. i guess ya can't read a fella's mind jim. specially in my case when there isn't much in there. i killed a lot of brain cells during my misspent, but fun, youth. :)
 

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Words that I lived by..........
The late George Carlin-
"Scientists say you only use 20% of your brain, so why not burn out the other 80%??"
 

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Didn't we ALL? 🤔
Hell, it was said that we only use 10% of our braincells... So that's why I drank so much when I was younger.

Chances are that any brain cells that were killed were ones I wasn't using.... I drank to create a more efficient brain!
 

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old scoot coot
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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Hell, it was said that we only use 10% of our braincells... So that's why I drank so much when I was younger.

Chances are that any brain cells that were killed were ones I wasn't using.... I drank to create a more efficient brain!
another wise man!
 

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Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. - Unknown
I think that was in the movie Robin Hood with Kevin Costner.
 

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