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Discussion Starter #1
When I got my XLC883 I decided to leave the factory tires on and run them till the day they would be recycled to rubber mulch. Didnt like the rear 150 at all. Would fight me in the twisties, the front 80/90 21" was horrible with grooves and road snakes. Front was toast in 8900 miles.

Now she wears my prefered brand of Shinko. 90/90 21" 777 up front and grooves and road snakes are ignored now. I went back to the 130/90 16" on the rear. Them 150s fight you in the curves. If I ever get another bike new the deal will be written with 130s to be put on before I leave. Best thing about the stock tires is they love going in a straight line on good pavement. I have no clue why they put them 150s on their though. They detract from the handling of the Sportster. Stock rear had about 4K left on it. I could have went 12K on it easily. Run the 712 on the rear. New front tire fills out the front fender now and looks better than the stock tire did.

What tires do you all like to run? And who has stock Michelins? Are they better than the dunlops. Never ran Michelins, kinda pricey and these Shinkos run just as good and better than some pricier tires. I know their radials suck but the bias tires are great..
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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Must be something with that model bike. I ran my stock Dunlops for 26000 miles front and rear and still had rubber on them when I replaced them with the same Dunlops. Those 26K miles were mostly hard highway miles all over the US and they handled beautifully on my Ultra. Only changed them when I did because we had planned another cross country trip that didn't happen (yet). BTW, my riding buddy had 30K on his stock Dunlops with rubber still remaining when he changed his out...2009 Ultra. With that kind of longevity and no handling problems, I'll stay with these tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Must be something with that model bike. I ran my stock Dunlops for 26000 miles front and rear and still had rubber on them when I replaced them with the same Dunlops. Those 26K miles were mostly hard highway miles all over the US and they handled beautifully on my Ultra. Only changed them when I did because we had planned another cross country trip that didn't happen (yet). BTW, my riding buddy had 30K on his stock Dunlops with rubber still remaining when he changed his out...2009 Ultra. With that kind of longevity and no handling problems, I'll stay with these tires.
Good to hear. I had no problems with mine on long trips and full on rain storm traction was good enough to never fail me. Maybe its too robust of a tire for the sporty. My new tire is one load rating lower on the rear now and it is a dream to ride on with the lighter sportster. The problem I think, and Im just thinking here is the tiny tire had nowhere to dump heat and it wore out from heat more than anything. This new front has a lot more meat on it. I did my break in miles today and the front still has the nubbies on it, the rear ones are about half gone. Took some curves today at about 10-15 mph more today too. Not because they stick better but because it is not fighting me. I weighed myself in full uniform with boots on and all the crap I need to carry in my pockets, I weighed a whopping 164. Maybe most harley riders need that extra load rating lol. But them 150s wanted to buck back up and it was a constant fight.

What size is your front?
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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You may be onto something with the rating. I have easily 100 pounds on you and the Ultra surely has a weight edge on the Sporty.
 

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Mississippi Cajun
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Discussion Starter #7
Them miles are awesome.

I also learned a few things today. I went to gas up today and it took a little less gas than normal. Put the info into my smartphone app and I was set back a bit. This week I have driven exactly the same routes and days between fill ups. So the short of it, I am getting 10-11% better city miles per gallon. So I asked a few experts I know that work on bikes. It seems the tire on the rear now is 5.5 pounds lighter. I was told the engine does less work to spin the rear now, it also increases to the tire to road HP. I have noticed the engine sounds a tad different at same speeds and rpm as before. It all came together after I talked to my buddies that run some shops. I doubt I will feel the difference on the butt Dino, but my wallet will for sure notice a difference. Two fill ups and the increase is consistent. In a few months if I can find this thread I will update to make sure it is not a fluke, or just start a new thread.....
 

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Not likely the 5.5 lbs. made any real difference, but maybe the diameter is different. That would explain the different engine sound. Change gearing.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Difference is 3mm in height. When I replaced it there was a lot more than 3mm worn off the over all height of the stock tire. So the new tire is a tad taller. Im not a hobby rider or image owner. I ride every day of the year. I know my bike pretty good. Its not a gearing difference.

It is still a solid improvement in mileage. One can easily conclude an engine that suddenly gains a huge increase in mileage, that the engine will not be working as hard. Same concept as going the same speed up a hill as on a flat straight road. It is not a change in tire size that makes the engine work harder going up hill that changes its sound. Its the fact the engine is working harder. The engine uses less work to turn the lighter tire, less work requires less gas.
 
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