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Discussion Starter #1
is I recently went through a basic riders course and got my motorcycle endorsement. I am looking into getting my first bike by the end of September. Looking at the sportsters specifically the 883 and 1200 custom. As a beginner rider what is the best choice and be something I can ride daily as I will be using it mainly for driving to and from work at first then some scenic rides later on. Any info will help. Thank you
 

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Call me Gig.
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The best choice if you are considering any distance is neither. Make the the jump to a Dyna.
 

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The best choice if you are considering any distance is neither. Make the the jump to a Dyna.
X2.

Don't assume the Sportster line is the easiest for a new rider to manage, it isn't. Superglides were a better 1st choice, for instance, being far less top heavy.
 

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is I recently went through a basic riders course and got my motorcycle endorsement. I am looking into getting my first bike by the end of September. Looking at the sportsters specifically the 883 and 1200 custom. As a beginner rider what is the best choice and be something I can ride daily as I will be using it mainly for driving to and from work at first then some scenic rides later on. Any info will help. Thank you
There are those on this forum who ride Sportsters and are very happy with them. After not having a bike for many years I bought a 1200 Sportster myself and loved it--for maybe a year. Then went to a Dyna and now I ride a touring model. Seems to be a normal progression for the majority of riders to move up to a bigger bike(s). So, don't be choosing a Sportster because you believe it to be the appropriate beginner bike. Look at all the Dyna and Softail models as well. A bike can be a big investment and moving up can be costly. There is no reason a beginner can't start out on a Dyna or Softail model just as well as a Sportster.
 

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Outlaw Nipple Poster
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Go to the dealership and test ride them and select the one you feel most comfortable with.
 

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It depends a lot on what you can afford. A Sportster can be nice for running around town, but is top heavy. Not the best choice for a long ride. Whatever you decide, put an engine guard on it. The cost is a good investment.
 

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Poser Member # 99
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+ 2 go to the dealers and ride the different bikes a dyna or a little bigger bike is a better long run buy and it won't beat you up like a sportster will on the longer trips

I ride a bigger eletragilde


The comparison the sportster is a Kitchen chair and the Bagger is the lazy boy or couch . you'll figure it out
 

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This is what I noticed. Riding a sportster is like riding a 2x4, skinny, light, and pretty fast. I went to a softail first then my current road king. Heavier, wider, and more balanced. I would not recommend a sportster unless your a small rider and don't plan on a passenger.


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X2.

Don't assume the Sportster line is the easiest for a new rider to manage, it isn't. Superglides were a better 1st choice, for instance, being far less top heavy.
Have one of each and that's not a true statement at all. The super feels heavier in every way if you're walking it around. In motion the sportster is easier to throw around. All that being said get something out of the Dyna line for your first Harley if you want something comfortable to ride for more than an hour. Sportster guys will disagree, take it from someone who has both. The difference is night and day for long rides. I keep the sporty around because it's paid for and I'm not giving it away. The wife likes to ride it once and a while and I take it out if I feel like a change of pace.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the advice guys. It really does help. The reason I am looking at the sportsters is very much so budget trying to keep my bike payment and insurance under 220 a month. Which I can do in the sportster family. Another question for you guys do I buy new or used and what are the pro and cons of each and what are som thing I should look for when buying a used bike
 

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Thanks for the advice guys. It really does help. The reason I am looking at the sportsters is very much so budget trying to keep my bike payment and insurance under 220 a month. Which I can do in the sportster family. Another question for you guys do I buy new or used and what are the pro and cons of each and what are som thing I should look for when buying a used bike
If you decide on a Sportster, and I personally hope you don't, there are a lot of them around BARELY used and still under warranty and you can save quite a bit. A lot of folks get a Sportster and in weeks or months they want something bigger. Or maybe they just decide riding isn't their cup of tea. And some of them may keep their Sportster in the garage for a year or three before putting it up for sale. I haven't shopped for a Sportster in particular but in checking Craigslist and other sources just looking around the proverbial Sportster garage queens are out there. They may be out of warranty time wise but I've seen them with less than a 1,000 miles on them.
 

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I agree, buy used. You can find almost any bike you want with low miles if you hunt around a little. Also, you're likely to find used bikes with lots of accessories already installed saving you even more. All of our bikes are used. My Dyna was $8K with 5500 miles on the clock already clad with leather HD bags, detachable windshield, forward controls, pipes, and intake with tune.
 

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I started on A new sportster in 1976 rode it till 79 and bought A low rider. Never have wanted to step up from that size bike. Now ride A 97 Low Rider. Buy once save money.
 

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smitty8202,
Will your riding season will be coming to an end soon? Are you comfortable with making payments through the winter even though your riding opportunities might be limited? Consider buying a used bike that is the best budget value, and learn to ride on that - whatever it is. After a full season of riding, you will have a much better idea of what model will really suit you the best. As mentioned, engine guards will likely pay for themselves several times over. Good luck!

allen
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My riding season is year round as I live in Southern California. Went to the dealership today sat on some sportsters and dynas. You guys were right. I think a dyna is the way to go for me. Felt like I was sitting in the bike verse on it which I liked. Would of left with a 2012 switchback with 9200 miles on it for $13,000 but got hosed on their financing. $380 a month at 22% interest with minimum 20% down. Going through my bank which is way better just gotta wait for the loan to come through. May be driving it home intime for Labor Day weekend
 

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I have an Iron 883 and I love it. I just got back into riding after a 10 year leave of absence. I'm 5'9 and over 200lbs and the bike fits me fine. I do have forward controls on it. I would check out the Street 750. I saw one at the dealer and they look pretty nice. Good luck!
 

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There are many used bikes out there. Mine was 4 years old with 129 miles. Last night I saw a Yamaha dealer had 3 Harley's with under 1000 miles listed. Keep looking.
 
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