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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seems more of the torque settings are in. lbs. than ft. lbs. Is there a torque wrench that does both accurately, or do I need to get each separately?
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Seems more of the torque settings are in. lbs. than ft. lbs. Is there a torque wrench that does both accurately, or do I need to get each separately?
Thanks
All calibrated torque wrenches do in lbs and ft lbs accurately.

Just multiply ft lbs by 12 to get in lbs.


What you need to know is what range of torque you need to decide which wrench to buy.

The typical 3/8" drive torque wrench wont go down to 20 in lbs.
 

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All measuring tools have some tolerance. If you need to do both inch lbs. and foot lbs., get two torque wrenches. The tolerance on a foot lbs. wrench will be too high for accurate inch lbs. settings. Unless all of your inch lbs. settings are really high.
 

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Typical torque wrench is +/- 3% .

3% of 100 in/lbs = 3 in/lbs .

3% of 100 ft/lbs = 36 in/lbs .


Buy both in/lbs and ft/lbs wrenches . :)
 

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All measuring tools have some tolerance. If you need to do both inch lbs. and foot lbs., get two torque wrenches. The tolerance on a foot lbs. wrench will be too high for accurate inch lbs. settings. Unless all of your inch lbs. settings are really high.
Typical torque wrench is +/- 3% .

3% of 100 in/lbs = 3 in/lbs .

3% of 100 ft/lbs = 36 in/lbs .


Buy both in/lbs and ft/lbs wrenches . :)
I agree with these post. Another consideration is the length of the torque wrench. ft/lbs torque wrench are generally much longer than
in/lbs torque wrench and can be somewhat cumbersome on low torque (in/lbs) applications.
 

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According to my shop manual, critical and other fasteners are all covered by the two Craftsman torque wrenches I recently bought on sale with just a couple exceptions. For the inch/pound (wrench goes 25-250), the cover screws on the brake fluid reservoir (6-8 in/lbs). For the foot/pound (wrench goes 10-75), the rear axle (95-105 ft/lbs) and rear fork pivot nut (90-110). The rest are covered.
 

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I have a CDI (makers of Snap-On torque wrenches), goes from 20 - 150 in lb.
CDI 1501MRMH 1/4-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench 150-Pound Capacity - - Amazon.com


And a Craftsman digital, goes from 10 - 100 ft lbs.
Craftsman 9-47711 Electronic Torque Wrench, 3/8 in. Drive - Craftsman Digital Torque Wrench - Amazon.com





For someone that doesn't have any torque wrenches, I'd recommend getting first:
10 - 100 ft lb CDI

Then next get the 20 - 150 in lb CDI


CDI 1501MRMH 1/4-Inch Drive Click Torque Wrench 150-Pound Capacity - - Amazon.com
 

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I was thinking one of each............
Yup, one torque wrench wont span the entire range of what you need on your bike.

I'd say 10 - 100 ft lb would do about 60% of what you'd need,

and the 20 - 150 in lb would get you another 35%.
 
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I picked up a Snap on In/lbs torque wrench at a local online action for 40.00 bucks if I can find it this morning I'll post a pic . I've got some good deal watching local Online actions . Just picked up a new 6ft box blade foe 320.00 with the ripper teeth on a local action it was 45 miles from home
 

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I still have a SEARS ft.lbs. clicker my dad bought me along with a tool box set when I started high school. Also have a in.lb. SEARS clicker and a Harbor Freight clicker for low in.lbs. use. Compares well with the Sears In.lbs. wrench.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I did get the Sears in. lb. wrench only to try first...seems like more in. lb. fasteners on the bike. Haven't had a chance to use it yet. Probably get the ft. lb. wrench later.
 

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I got both from Sears. I use them both every time I do service. I recommend them both.
 

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I also have both in Craftsman. Sears has a 1/2" drive ft.-lbs. from 20 - 150 click type.
I think I paid about $75 for it. Well worth the money, and when reading the fine print, they are all right around +\- 2%
 

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I wound up with three. A small 1/4" drive 20-150 inch pounds for tight places, a 3/8" drive 20-250 inch pounds, and a 1/2" drive 20-250 foot pounds for torquing larger bolts and lug nuts on my cars and RV.

The 3/8" 20-250 inch pounds gets the most use on the bike but I've used all three over the years.
 

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After purchase of a carbonic wheel and to a p_dsid_l, there was a sensitive issue in purchase of a dinamometrichny key. Happened in my practice broke r_zb, there is no strong wish to repeat this sad practice, and to spoil very expensive a product even worse. Got acquainted with a subject a little, read Info and found out that it is necessary to take a key with the smallest error of 2 24 nanometers and a head 1/4.https://torquewrenchguide.com/reviews/best-torque-wrenches-for-motorcycles/

You don't say. I understand clearly now. :loco
 

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I've got 3 click-type torque wrenches. Torque wrenches aren't cheap. One's an in-lb (20-180) 1/4" drive, one's a ft-lb (10-150) 1/2" drive and the third is another ft-lbs (50-300) with what I think is a 3/4" drive.

You need probably the first two. You only need the big boy for a handful of things that a lot of people would rather take it to a shop to have work done on those areas.

Just make sure you take care of them. Put them at their lowest setting when storing, don't drop or slam them, try to not use them for removing nuts/bolts, etc.

Also, don't use the very lowest or highest setting for your wrench, it may not click accurately. For example, anything that says 10 ft lbs, I don't use my 10-150 ft lbs wrench on, I just set the in-lb wrench to 120.

And if you need to use crowfoot wrenches with a torque, try to use them at a 90° angle to the wrench, otherwise, if you use them straight out from the wrench, you gotta do math to figure out what the torque is (you make the wrench longer, you change the torque regardless of what the setting says).

Also, never use a breaker bar on a torque wrench and always hold it squarely and evenly on the grip area of the handle, not choked up or at the very bottom (inaccurate torque). The click type are meant to click at the set torque based on a measurement from the drive to the hand grip, not to the butt or the middle or 2 feet beyond the handle down an extension bar.
 
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