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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Every weekend I see more and more trikes. Maybe when I can't hold mine up, way in future I hope, I'll convert mine
im 52 and was doing just fine but I may be a lil early for a trike but it makes sense for us a lil more safety nicer ride and we like to go places but never had any storage so all the storage is a big plus as well but if it keeps us riding off into the sunset together I’m all for it.
 

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Just some trike FYI. Try before you buy ! Test ride, test ride and test ride some more.

Trikes do not ride like motorcycles. Motorcycles you steer with your body, trikes you steer with the handlebars. Motorcycles you put your feet down, trikes you do not put your feet down. (That's always been the tough one for me !) Motorcycles don't usually back up, some trikes do back up. More parts on the vehicle to do that !

I suppose the point I'm trying to make is that motorcycles and trikes are very different. Don't make the mistake as many that I've known have made. They say things like, "I've been riding for 30 years, should be no problem transitioning." Or, "My knees are shot and can't hold the bike up anymore so a trike should be easy." Lots more of those quotes but space is at a premium here.

Again, if you're thinking trike there's a good reason behind those thoughts. Do some test riding because if you do buy that trike and decide you don't like it afterwards you'll be stuck with it ($) or take the bite ($) selling it.
 
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First off, everybody is different and no one reacts the same after a collision. Mine was similar to yours, a left turn in front of me on my way home from work. My bike wasn't totaled but did have a fair amount of damage. Being 40 years ago when I was young and financially disabled I didn't have a lot of insurance on my bike but the other guy had none so I was on my own. Only injuries I suffered were a broken finger, a bump on the back of my head and a long but shallow gash on my shin. The bike was worse. Dented gas tank. Bent forks, bent wheel, bent handle bars and numerous small items bent, buckled, twisted, or distorted. Thought while it was down I would do a few other things I had wanted to do so it was a couple of months before it got back on the road. It was so good to be riding again. Next day after getting it back on the road I got to ride it to work. All is ok until I came to that intersection, then the sweats started, stopped breathing for a minute, tensed up like a stiff all the time looking for that *******. It wasn't until a half block or so later that things started getting back to normal. Each day it was less and less until it was finally gone. Hope your stuff comes out ok, it is survivable with time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Just some trike FYI. Try before you buy ! Test ride, test ride and test ride some more.

Trikes do not ride like motorcycles. Motorcycles you steer with your body, trikes you steer with the handlebars. Motorcycles you put your feet down, trikes you do not put your feet down. (That's always been the tough one for me !) Motorcycles don't usually back up, some trikes do back up. More parts on the vehicle to do that !

I suppose the point I'm trying to make is that motorcycles and trikes are very different. Don't make the mistake as many that I've known have made. They say things like, "I've been riding for 30 years, should be no problem transitioning." Or, "My knees are shot and can't hold the bike up anymore so a trike should be easy." Lots more of those quotes but space is at a premium here.

Again, if you're thinking trike there's a good reason behind those thoughts. Do some test riding because if you do buy that trike and decide you don't like it afterwards you'll be stuck with it ($) or take the bite ($) selling it.
I really appreciate the info and I been to the Harley dealership and have talked to them and have talked to guys that do the Harley demo fleet and have been told pretty much what you have said and you gave me more to think about as well. I will test ride many times before just buying and riding home. Like you said these are 2 different beast that u can ride. I thank you for telling me this and gave me more thoughts and questions. Thanks greatly appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
First off, everybody is different and no one reacts the same after a collision. Mine was similar to yours, a left turn in front of me on my way home from work. My bike wasn't totaled but did have a fair amount of damage. Being 40 years ago when I was young and financially disabled I didn't have a lot of insurance on my bike but the other guy had none so I was on my own. Only injuries I suffered were a broken finger, a bump on the back of my head and a long but shallow gash on my shin. The bike was worse. Dented gas tank. Bent forks, bent wheel, bent handle bars and numerous small items bent, buckled, twisted, or distorted. Thought while it was down I would do a few other things I had wanted to do so it was a couple of months before it got back on the road. It was so good to be riding again. Next day after getting it back on the road I got to ride it to work. All is ok until I came to that intersection, then the sweats started, stopped breathing for a minute, tensed up like a stiff all the time looking for that ***. It wasn't until a half block or so later that things started getting back to normal. Each day it was less and less until it was finally gone. Hope your stuff comes out ok, it is survivable with time.
well thanks for sharing your story. Sounds like you faired out much better than I did 32 days in the hospital drove me nuts. I freaked Out when we were traveling towards the scene my wife turned around cause I couldn’t do it and still won’t go that way. Hope it does get better. I just take a step at a time. I hope I can get over it like you did yours. Thanks again.
 

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Wow thanks for telling me your story. Glad you made it through as well. It’s tough for me cause I know in my heart I can ride again I think if I rode just to work and back a few times she might get back on and do lil trips at first. She’s aggrandize that I won’t be comfortable or enjoy the ride because I’ll be over cautious and always looking. So I’m in a tight spot. We love riding we live in Pennsylvania and I’m just a nice ride a lil over an hour from the flight 93 memorial. We love that ride and get to stop at our favorite restaurant on that ride. I just don’t want us both to stop something we both love
Glad you made it , as for riding again personal choice , helmet I would strongly recommend , not preaching but , it is a dangerous sport , for sure that's why not everyone does it , but trust your gut , and you will know when and if you can ride again .best of luck !
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Glad you made it , as for riding again personal choice , helmet I would strongly recommend , not preaching but , it is a dangerous sport , for sure that's why not everyone does it , but trust your gut , and you will know when and if you can ride again .best of luck !
I appreciate the reply and I do understand the helmet thing I wear one from time to time but not all the time for this wreck for instance but I have no memory of the accident. My bad. I feel the need and want to ride again it’s in my gut. Just the wife I worry about. I’ll keep ya posted. Thank you
 

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The Walk

I'm not even a spithouse shrink. All I can leave you with is what I was handed when I found myself standing in a pair of boots much like the ones your wearing now.

When you know pain you learn a few things about healing.

The Walk gets you back out to the scene. Begin a block before the point of impact. Force your mind back to the way you felt when you were riding worry free. Where did you usually ride in the lane? When was the last time you looked down at the speedo? What were you thinking about? What were you on the way to do? You might have to just stand there and cry.
Can't yet?

Walk toward the point of impact. Where were you when you first saw the car? How does the road surface look?

The whole focus here is working through it, getting it all out. I could do it in my mind but walking it....whew.

The light at the end of the tunnel, my driving force to continue, was my unshakeable knowledge that ANYTHING that happened to me on two wheels was my fault and my responsibility. Clearly, you were not to blame in your accident but that doesn't even begin to mitigate your pain and suffering. I had to examine every minute detail to see if there was ANYTHING that I could have done differently.

I had to have a thread of hope that I could grab onto. A belief that I could do SOMETHING to prevent it from ever happening again. See, without that belief, how could you EVER even think of swinging a leg over another motorcycle?

Maybe I was in the wrong spot in the lane. Maybe I should have slowed and covered the brake going into the intersection.....I don't know, but DAMN IT....something.

Sitting there alone. Walking it back and forth. No B.S. in the game.

If your slates still clean....then think about what you could have done better? There's a lot of Roadcraft about motorcycles and intersections that's been written.....You're looking at inches, nuances that someone on the curb would never notice. Looking at the tires of the oncoming, making eye contact, lane position....Your learning has now suddenly given you purpose.

You have known the joy. Some never experience it.
Even if you decide to wait....that's how you leave it....you wait to ride again. You don't ever have to just give up...you just wait a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
The Walk

I'm not even a spithouse shrink. All I can leave you with is what I was handed when I found myself standing in a pair of boots much like the ones your wearing now.

When you know pain you learn a few things about healing.

The Walk gets you back out to the scene. Begin a block before the point of impact. Force your mind back to the way you felt when you were riding worry free. Where did you usually ride in the lane? When was the last time you looked down at the speedo? What were you thinking about? What were you on the way to do? You might have to just stand there and cry.
Can't yet?

Walk toward the point of impact. Where were you when you first saw the car? How does the road surface look?

The whole focus here is working through it, getting it all out. I could do it in my mind but walking it....whew.

The light at the end of the tunnel, my driving force to continue, was my unshakeable knowledge that ANYTHING that happened to me on two wheels was my fault and my responsibility. Clearly, you were not to blame in your accident but that doesn't even begin to mitigate your pain and suffering. I had to examine every minute detail to see if there was ANYTHING that I could have done differently.

I had to have a thread of hope that I could grab onto. A belief that I could do SOMETHING to prevent it from ever happening again. See, without that belief, how could you EVER even think of swinging a leg over another motorcycle?

Maybe I was in the wrong spot in the lane. Maybe I should have slowed and covered the brake going into the intersection.....I don't know, but DAMN IT....something.

Sitting there alone. Walking it back and forth. No B.S. in the game.

If your slates still clean....then think about what you could have done better? There's a lot of Roadcraft about motorcycles and intersections that's been written.....You're looking at inches, nuances that someone on the curb would never notice. Looking at the tires of the oncoming, making eye contact, lane position....Your learning has now suddenly given you purpose.

You have known the joy. Some never experience it.
Even if you decide to wait....that's how you leave it....you wait to ride again. You don't ever have to just give up...you just wait a while.
thank you I appreciate that that’s a lot to take in but a lot of truth and things to think about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Ouch, that was a hard hit, but bikes can be replaced. You can not.

It sounds like you have some time to find the right bike to come your way, and you'll know when it does.
yes it was a hard hit from what. Was told and a passer bye actually saw me in the air as she was driving through. Sometimes wish I could remember the accident but times I’m happy I don’t. I agree time will come And will the bike will come as well. Thankfully I have my other passion which is ford mustangs. Have one but will get more. I had 7 so far myself. Lol
 

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I had pretty much the same thing happen to me in 2003. New Electra Glide in Gunmetal Pearl...400 miles on her. Teenage girl left turned in front of me. I got it slowed to about 5-10 mph before impact. Separated shoulder sprained wrist and 10k damage to the bike. The bike was fixed before I was. When I got back on I was sure that every car in oncoming traffic was going to turn left in front of me. That passed with time. I was not wearing a helmet either but my head never hit the pavement. I was lucky. I am now an ATTGAT guy. Jacket, helmet, long sleeves, and gloves. I will say that what I experienced when I rode after the crash had to stop because I fixated on the oncoming cars WAY too much. It took my focus away from what I needed to have which is 360 degree awareness. After the bike is replaced, or if you're not sure about riding, go do a demo day at a dealer and see how riding feels. It will be weird at first, but see if you still love it. If you do, go ride. Whatever your decision, good luck to you and I hope you continue to heal both physically and mentally. Make sure you are healed in every way before you ride. Peace.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
I had pretty much the same thing happen to me in 2003. New Electra Glide in Gunmetal Pearl...400 miles on her. Teenage girl left turned in front of me. I got it slowed to about 5-10 mph before impact. Separated shoulder sprained wrist and 10k damage to the bike. The bike was fixed before I was. When I got back on I was sure that every car in oncoming traffic was going to turn left in front of me. That passed with time. I was not wearing a helmet either but my head never hit the pavement. I was lucky. I am now an ATTGAT guy. Jacket, helmet, long sleeves, and gloves. I will say that what I experienced when I rode after the crash had to stop because I fixated on the oncoming cars WAY too much. It took my focus away from what I needed to have which is 360 degree awareness. After the bike is replaced, or if you're not sure about riding, go do a demo day at a dealer and see how riding feels. It will be weird at first, but see if you still love it. If you do, go ride. Whatever your decision, good luck to you and I hope you continue to heal both physically and mentally. Make sure you are healed in every way before you ride. Peace.
Thank so much for sharing your story. You hit a lot of good points. I do plan on doing demo rides just to see and if all is good look for another bike. First thing first is getting myself back in shape and all well and talking to my wife. Riding was such a huge part of our summer and life. Love riding with her. Best feeling in the world. I’m just thankful she was not with me at the time of the accident but feel bad cause when the accident happened she got the call and was a lil over an hour away from the hospital her and her daughters were in their way back from a cheer competition. I can’t imagine what went through her mind when she got the call. Thank you for your thoughts I appreciate it glad you are well
 
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