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I don't understand people buying ethanol fuel IF non-ethanol fuels are available.
The reason people don`t buy non ethanol fuels has already been explained to you, but I`ll give it one more shot...

Most areas do not have high octane non ethanol fuels, and certainly not available at a 10 cent per gallon difference.

If we could find premium grade non ethanol gas at a reasonable price?

Of course we would buy it...
 

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The reason people don`t buy non ethanol fuels has already been explained to you, but I`ll give it one more shot...

Most areas do not have high octane non ethanol fuels, and certainly not available at a 10 cent per gallon difference.

If we could fine premium grade non ethanol gas at a reasonable price, of course we would buy it...
Thanks.
 

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weird member
1997 Softail Custom (FXSTC)
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Here's the thing... just don't let it sit?

If something is gonna sit a while, drain gas, or at least the carb. No need to treat with fuel stabilizers ever unless it's sitting for a while. And if you want emergency gas, well it's really not that expensive to treat it. And if you're that hard up for money that you can't spend $5 or whatever to treat up to 20 gallons of fuel... maybe just dump your emergency gas in a vehicle that gets used regularly and refill the emergency can once every 3-6 months. Or, you can order cans of non-ethanol 93 octane online that are good for like 1-2 years if unopened, just make sure you use them before they expire.

A shovelhead or newer should be more than capable of running 10% ethanol blended fuel without problems. The only consideration is really, don't let it sit for long periods of time. If you have to store your bike, you should be draining the carb regardless of whether you're running ethanol blended or non-ethanol gas.

Around here, "premium" is 93 octane, we don't have 91 octane here (I know some places premium is 91 and some places offers both 91 and 93). It's all ethanol blended. There's only two places to get non-ethanol, and it's only available in 87 octane. My bike is not stock and was timed and tuned to run on 91-93 octane. Been running 10% ethanol gas for years now in my Evo with no problems.

As far as I know, any vehicle designed to run on unleaded gas, can handle up to 10 or even 15% ethanol blended gas. You only need a special "flex fuel" type engine for greater amounts.

Ethanol fuel is also nothing new, nor tuning an engine to run on an ethanol blend:
The Ford Model T, produced from 1908 through 1927, was fitted with a carburetor with adjustable jetting, allowing use of ethanol, gasoline or kerosene (each by itself), or a combination of the first two mentioned fuels.
 
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Mr. James
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Here's the thing... just don't let it sit?

If something is gonna sit a while, drain gas, or at least the carb. No need to treat with fuel stabilizers ever unless it's sitting for a while. And if you want emergency gas, well it's really not that expensive to treat it. And if you're that hard up for money that you can't spend $5 or whatever to treat up to 20 gallons of fuel... maybe just dump your emergency gas in a vehicle that gets used regularly and refill the emergency can once every 3-6 months. Or, you can order cans of non-ethanol 93 octane online that are good for like 1-2 years if unopened, just make sure you use them before they expire.

A shovelhead or newer should be more than capable of running 10% ethanol blended fuel without problems. The only consideration is really, don't let it sit for long periods of time. If you have to store your bike, you should be draining the carb regardless of whether you're running ethanol blended or non-ethanol gas.

Around here, "premium" is 93 octane, we don't have 91 octane here (I know some places premium is 91 and some places offers both 91 and 93). It's all ethanol blended. There's only two places to get non-ethanol, and it's only available in 87 octane. My bike is not stock and was timed and tuned to run on 91-93 octane. Been running 10% ethanol gas for years now in my Evo with no problems.

As far as I know, any vehicle designed to run on unleaded gas, can handle up to 10 or even 15% ethanol blended gas. You only need a special "flex fuel" type engine for greater amounts.

Ethanol fuel is also nothing new, nor tuning an engine to run on an ethanol blend:
Excellent explanation. I sometimes make my own 91-ish octane by diluting the 93 with 87, in the right amount of course. The Sheetz that just opened up over here even has 88 octane and it is $0.50/gallon less than 87. Don't know why, but I like it. The GF has a flex-fuel Ford Taurus and it runs waaaaay better and better fuel economy on that corn-squeesins crap. It's $1.00 less than 87 right now. Hard to lose with that stuff.
 

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weird member
1997 Softail Custom (FXSTC)
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Excellent explanation. I sometimes make my own 91-ish octane by diluting the 93 with 87, in the right amount of course. The Sheetz that just opened up over here even has 88 octane and it is $0.50/gallon less than 87. Don't know why, but I like it. The GF has a flex-fuel Ford Taurus and it runs waaaaay better and better fuel economy on that corn-squeesins crap. It's $1.00 less than 87 right now. Hard to lose with that stuff.
Yeah, if you design the engine different, it can run on a different fuel with better mileage whether you're looking at miles per gallon or dollars of fuel per mile. But it depends on the engine design or the tuning. But there's only so much flexibility there. Like, you can't tune an aluminum gas engine to run diesel fuel, obviously.

A lot is in how it's tuned. A lot of modern EFI cars for example like, some Mustangs (I dunno if all or what years), they're designed to run on a minimum 87 octane and they have more power when running on 93, but that's because sensors and the computer changes engine timing and things like that. Or rather, the computer and engine has knock sensors that retard the timing, so you end up with less power when running 87 but don't have engine damage and stuff. But you look at a different car, like some family sedan, you don't get more power on 93 octane than you get on 87 because it was designed for 87 and doesn't have the way to take advantage of 93. Hell, maybe they have VVT as part of that too, or maybe that's how flex fuel engines work? But yeah, that's strictly talking octane of one type of fuel.

Like, the flex fuel you're talking about is probably designed to run on 85% ethanol, so it's most efficient running that rather than running 10% ethanol gas or non-ethanol gas even though it can run those, much in the same way the aforementioned Mustang can run 87 to 93 by adjusting itself.

Anyway, gasoline and how it works isn't that complicated for the end user, but these topics can get almost as nuts as oil threads.
 
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I run 89 octane in the Rocket ( low Compression) Run 91octane in the Fiat and the Harley. 90% of the time fill up here in town. Small Loves gas station only sells real gas. I have no problem paying the extra for real gas. Corn syrup is for cooking ain't for gas tanks. Call it old fashion or call it being stupid but the real gas runs better. Milage is better and so is the way the engines run. I call it common sense. Then again what do I know.
 
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