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After researching on cooling fans for my Road King as thoroughly as I can, I opted for the Wards Forced Convection System. Its small and sweet appearance for all the cooling capacity it seems to offer played a substantial role in my choice. When I e-mailed Jason, the owner, for payment and shipment methods; I realized that I was dealing with a top-notch businessman. I wish there were more analogue businesses like his, managed like he does, in this mainly digital World where most businesses are managed greedily.

My first impression when I opened the box was that this was a solidly built, quality item. The installation was pretty straightforward. The horn must be removed first:

The tank doesn’t have to be removed but doing so offers several ways for routing the cables. This is not the simplest of them but I reckon I ended up with the tidiest possible outcome:

The fin just under the front cylinder head bolt, opposite to the rear cylinder; must be thoroughly cleaned and degreased so that it is ready for the adhesion of the thermal switch. The seal must cure overnight, while the sensor is pressed with a wedge. Jason warns on the instructions that a shortcut or impatience at this step would lead to starting all over again. I used an RTV silicone seal:

Once the horn is given the necessary clearance with the supplied spacers, everything fits nicely:

There are several color options to choose from. I opted for the black frame finish that matches the color of the cylinder fins. As for the mesh material on the round fan inlets, my choice was stainless steel finish for harmony with the color of the machined edges of the fins. IMO, the system aesthetically merges nicely with the legendary V-Twin:

The fans start blowing when the front head reaches about 90˚C (194˚F) and they keep blowing until the head temp is somewhat below this. I could not yet install my digital temp gauge to monitor head temps so I cannot be specific at the moment, other than letting you know about the specs. However, they seem to blow almost all the time on the road, even if I cannot hear them. They sure blow for some time after the engine is turned off.

They are rather quiet. I cannot hear them on the road, through my full face helmet and with my stock exhaust system. At idle, in stop and go traffic (which is the main reason why I bought them) I can hear them if I listen to carefully and if there are no noisy motor vehicles around. When I park, I can hear them, especially after taking my helmet off and very clearly after turning the ignition off. They sound just like what they are. This is a blend of the whiz of high revving electric motors and mutely whistling fans.

During my first (and sole) outing after installing the system, I was in a parking lot, with the hot engine turned off. The fans were blowing. A youngster stood by me in wonder while I took my gloves, my helmet and my jacket off. He then asked me if the new Harleys are so equipped. I told him that this is an aftermarket item. He was surprised. He thought this was OEM.

My experience is only so far but I will post more when I use the system further, especially after installing my digital temp gauge. I would also like to answer any questions, as far as I can.
 

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I just installed wards fans in my Switchback. the spark plug cables were almost a problem but a little maneuvering got them out of the way. it's not summer yet but riding in the mid 80s the head temps have stayed almost 30 degrees lower and the bike actually cools down when idling.

if you have OEM exhaust you'll probably hear them. I have the Screamin eagle muffler and can barely hear them at idle.
 

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I have been wondering about the options to help cool my Ultra. It's not even 80's yet in Texas and I am already wondering if I can tolerate the heat sitting at a redlight in 100 degree heat.
 

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After researching on cooling fans for my Road King as thoroughly as I can, I opted for the Wards Forced Convection System. Its small and sweet appearance for all the cooling capacity it seems to offer played a substantial role in my choice. When I e-mailed Jason, the owner, for payment and shipment methods; I realized that I was dealing with a top-notch businessman. I wish there were more analogue businesses like his, managed like he does, in this mainly digital World where most businesses are managed greedily.

My first impression when I opened the box was that this was a solidly built, quality item. The installation was pretty straightforward. The horn must be removed first:

The tank doesn’t have to be removed but doing so offers several ways for routing the cables. This is not the simplest of them but I reckon I ended up with the tidiest possible outcome:

The fin just under the front cylinder head bolt, opposite to the rear cylinder; must be thoroughly cleaned and degreased so that it is ready for the adhesion of the thermal switch. The seal must cure overnight, while the sensor is pressed with a wedge. Jason warns on the instructions that a shortcut or impatience at this step would lead to starting all over again. I used an RTV silicone seal:

Once the horn is given the necessary clearance with the supplied spacers, everything fits nicely:

There are several color options to choose from. I opted for the black frame finish that matches the color of the cylinder fins. As for the mesh material on the round fan inlets, my choice was stainless steel finish for harmony with the color of the machined edges of the fins. IMO, the system aesthetically merges nicely with the legendary V-Twin:

The fans start blowing when the front head reaches about 90˚C (194˚F) and they keep blowing until the head temp is somewhat below this. I could not yet install my digital temp gauge to monitor head temps so I cannot be specific at the moment, other than letting you know about the specs. However, they seem to blow almost all the time on the road, even if I cannot hear them. They sure blow for some time after the engine is turned off.

They are rather quiet. I cannot hear them on the road, through my full face helmet and with my stock exhaust system. At idle, in stop and go traffic (which is the main reason why I bought them) I can hear them if I listen to carefully and if there are no noisy motor vehicles around. When I park, I can hear them, especially after taking my helmet off and very clearly after turning the ignition off. They sound just like what they are. This is a blend of the whiz of high revving electric motors and mutely whistling fans.

During my first (and sole) outing after installing the system, I was in a parking lot, with the hot engine turned off. The fans were blowing. A youngster stood by me in wonder while I took my gloves, my helmet and my jacket off. He then asked me if the new Harleys are so equipped. I told him that this is an aftermarket item. He was surprised. He thought this was OEM.

My experience is only so far but I will post more when I use the system further, especially after installing my digital temp gauge. I would also like to answer any questions, as far as I can.
hi orhan. wise choice on wards fans. if you hold your hand behind rear cyl when they are running, you will see why in that application size is not that important. i put them on my rd king last spring. i live in s e kansas and in july and aug we are over 100f many days. it used to go into etmis sp a lot in stop and go traffic. it did not ever do that all last summer. jason did good. enjoy your new scoot. it sure is a beauty. tommy:biking:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have been wondering about the options to help cool my Ultra. It's not even 80's yet in Texas and I am already wondering if I can tolerate the heat sitting at a redlight in 100 degree heat.
I installed the Wards system due to my understanding that I should not expose my Harley to no wind conditions for long. I believe air cooled and air+oil cooled motorcycles are actually wind cooled, unless fans are involved. That is, they are wind cooled when in motion but almost not cooled (or insufficiently cooled) when stationary with the engine idling.

hi orhan. wise choice on wards fans. if you hold your hand behind rear cyl when they are running, you will see why in that application size is not that important.
Hi Tommy. I couldn't agree more. If blowing a certain volume of air to the hottest spots on the engine at a certain velocity does keep the engine at normal operating temperature, then, blowing further volumes of air at larger areas, including cooler spots, presumably at slower velocity; is not appealing to me. Compactness is a bonus for me, provided that the mission is accomplished.

If I could measure everything, I would have liked to measure the heat energy that is dissipated. I bet this would not be proportional to fan diameter.
 

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Shameless bump for the wards fans.

I live about 30 miles from him and he has been great. I had troubles with the front fan and the thermal switch and both of those problems were solved that day by him. He has given me better support than you could ever dream of!

I also enjoyed some time talking to him about his development of these units. He gave me a thermal switch with slightly higher on/off trigger temps and a thicker isolator for the horn and fans to eliminate vibration contact with the cylinder fins. He also said he's working with a new manufacturer for a fan with even more airflow. These current fans are already jet engines so I can't wait to see the new ones.

If you ever thought of an oil cooler or anything I definitely encourage you to check these fans out. They are very effective and easier to install than an oil cooler. I can also verify if you've ordered a chrome unit, they're coming! He is very picky on the chrome and said that has caused a huge delay due to imperfectly finished parts but I saw at least 20 fan cases ready for assembly.
(I don't work for wards. I'm not related to him. I'm just a very happy customer)
 

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Thank you for the bump azglocker. Since I had promised an update, you offered me a good opportunity for keeping my word.

The heat of the summer didn’t seem to be particularly taxing for my Harley, despite having to spend countless hours in VERY dense city traffic. I had to crawl for an hour in the morning and another hour in the evening rush hours of Istanbul, every other day, for about two months. According to EU statistics, this is the most intense traffic density in the entire continent of Europe. I wonder if any city in the World is worse in that respect. Ambient temp was never below 30˚C (86˚F), often exceeding 35˚C (95˚F).

I also made a week-long trip in warmer climate. Ambient temp varied between 35 and 40˚C (95 and 104˚F) during daytime and exceeded 42˚C (108˚F) once. Nevertheless, all this was at cruising speeds. Therefore, the challenge was not as severe as the stop and go type of city riding I mentioned above.

According to my H-D Digital Oil Dipstick and to my rigorous, if not fanatical checks; my oil never exceeded 128˚C (262˚F) during the entire summer season. I reckon this is a good indication that my engine did not overheat. Consequently, I gave up installing a digital temp gauge for monitoring my head temps. Needless to say, the EITMS never kicked-in. I assume it never came even close to kicking-in. BTW, my catalytic converters are intact and my fuel management is stock. My mufflers are Screaming Eagle Street Cannons, if this matters.

On the other hand, the Wards fans were not alone in dissipating the excess heat. I also have an Ultra Cool Reefer oil cooler. I don’t know what temps I would read if I had kept the stock oil cooler but the fans of the Reefer always kicked-in at the first traffic congestion and kept running until I stop at my destination. They did their job. Yet, the heat the Wards fans blow out of the engine is beyond comparison. I am confident that they are doing an excellent job in keeping my engine temp in check under severe conditions.
 

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Thank you for the bump azglocker. Since I had promised an update, you offered me a good opportunity for keeping my word.

The heat of the summer didn’t seem to be particularly taxing for my Harley, despite having to spend countless hours in VERY dense city traffic. I had to crawl for an hour in the morning and another hour in the evening rush hours of Istanbul, every other day, for about two months. According to EU statistics, this is the most intense traffic density in the entire continent of Europe. I wonder if any city in the World is worse in that respect. Ambient temp was never below 30˚C (86˚F), often exceeding 35˚C (95˚F).

I also made a week-long trip in warmer climate. Ambient temp varied between 35 and 40˚C (95 and 104˚F) during daytime and exceeded 42˚C (108˚F) once. Nevertheless, all this was at cruising speeds. Therefore, the challenge was not as severe as the stop and go type of city riding I mentioned above.

According to my H-D Digital Oil Dipstick and to my rigorous, if not fanatical checks; my oil never exceeded 128˚C (262˚F) during the entire summer season. I reckon this is a good indication that my engine did not overheat. Consequently, I gave up installing a digital temp gauge for monitoring my head temps. Needless to say, the EITMS never kicked-in. I assume it never came even close to kicking-in. BTW, my catalytic converters are intact and my fuel management is stock. My mufflers are Screaming Eagle Street Cannons, if this matters.

On the other hand, the Wards fans were not alone in dissipating the excess heat. I also have an Ultra Cool Reefer oil cooler. I don’t know what temps I would read if I had kept the stock oil cooler but the fans of the Reefer always kicked-in at the first traffic congestion and kept running until I stop at my destination. They did their job. Yet, the heat the Wards fans blow out of the engine is beyond comparison. I am confident that they are doing an excellent job in keeping my engine temp in check under severe conditions.
Very nice , glad there worked out for you .

How is your Dad doing ??
 

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Thank you for the bump azglocker. Since I had promised an update, you offered me a good opportunity for keeping my word.

The heat of the summer didn’t seem to be particularly taxing for my Harley, despite having to spend countless hours in VERY dense city traffic. I had to crawl for an hour in the morning and another hour in the evening rush hours of Istanbul, every other day, for about two months. According to EU statistics, this is the most intense traffic density in the entire continent of Europe. I wonder if any city in the World is worse in that respect. Ambient temp was never below 30˚C (86˚F), often exceeding 35˚C (95˚F).

I also made a week-long trip in warmer climate. Ambient temp varied between 35 and 40˚C (95 and 104˚F) during daytime and exceeded 42˚C (108˚F) once. Nevertheless, all this was at cruising speeds. Therefore, the challenge was not as severe as the stop and go type of city riding I mentioned above.

According to my H-D Digital Oil Dipstick and to my rigorous, if not fanatical checks; my oil never exceeded 128˚C (262˚F) during the entire summer season. I reckon this is a good indication that my engine did not overheat. Consequently, I gave up installing a digital temp gauge for monitoring my head temps. Needless to say, the EITMS never kicked-in. I assume it never came even close to kicking-in. BTW, my catalytic converters are intact and my fuel management is stock. My mufflers are Screaming Eagle Street Cannons, if this matters.

On the other hand, the Wards fans were not alone in dissipating the excess heat. I also have an Ultra Cool Reefer oil cooler. I don’t know what temps I would read if I had kept the stock oil cooler but the fans of the Reefer always kicked-in at the first traffic congestion and kept running until I stop at my destination. They did their job. Yet, the heat the Wards fans blow out of the engine is beyond comparison. I am confident that they are doing an excellent job in keeping my engine temp in check under severe conditions.
Had a great time, even for a night when I was in Istanbul. The hotel and the hospitality were awesome! If I get a chance to go back I will stay for a while longer.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Very nice , glad there worked out for you .

How is your Dad doing ??
Thank you for asking webco. He is at home, now. It seems the cardiologist was somewhat overoptimistic about the outcome of the surgery. Cardiac insufficiency remains on the agenda. For the time being, I fail in understanding how severe this is. His cardiologist and hematologist are now collaborating for getting rid of some blood abnormalities. Further tests and time will tell us how he is doing. In any case, what counts most at his age is that he is with us. However, my Harley needs to be patient for giving him another ride.

Had a great time, even for a night when I was in Istanbul. The hotel and the hospitality were awesome! If I get a chance to go back I will stay for a while longer.
Please let me know if you do so. It is a nice city, as long as one can stay out of the traffic congestion.
 

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Thank you for asking webco. He is at home, now. It seems the cardiologist was somewhat overoptimistic about the outcome of the surgery. Cardiac insufficiency remains on the agenda. For the time being, I fail in understanding how severe this is. His cardiologist and hematologist are now collaborating for getting rid of some blood abnormalities. Further tests and time will tell us how he is doing. In any case, what counts most at his age is that he is with us. However, my Harley needs to be patient for giving him another ride.
It is good news that your Dad is home now . :thumb

I'll keep him in our prayers for his continual improvement .
 

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I have the Love Jugs,and love them.Have the solid frame mount and they work great. In the Texas heat doing a PGR mission they really help...they are also great people to deal with...
 

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Thank you for asking webco. He is at home, now. It seems the cardiologist was somewhat overoptimistic about the outcome of the surgery. Cardiac insufficiency remains on the agenda. For the time being, I fail in understanding how severe this is. His cardiologist and hematologist are now collaborating for getting rid of some blood abnormalities. Further tests and time will tell us how he is doing. In any case, what counts most at his age is that he is with us. However, my Harley needs to be patient for giving him another ride.



Please let me know if you do so. It is a nice city, as long as one can stay out of the traffic congestion.
Orhan, will take you up on it if I make it that way again. Flew Turkish Airways, the food and hospitality was the best I have seen. The people go out of their way to make you feel like at home. And night life was great.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It is good news that your Dad is home now . :thumb

I'll keep him in our prayers for his continual improvement .
Thank you webco2. This does mean a lot.

Orhan, will take you up on it if I make it that way again. Flew Turkish Airways, the food and hospitality was the best I have seen. The people go out of their way to make you feel like at home. And night life was great.
If you fly Turkish Airlines again, taste some Turkish wines. You may be positively surprised if you like sec or semi-sec wine.
 
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