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This came from a post I made here on another topic. Some of it is repeated here so that the question can be put in context.

I had a conversation this afternoon with a fellow who is 50, started riding a minibike at 7, went to dirt bikes at 10 and has been riding motorcycles on the street since 15. He watches the Ride Like A Pro videos periodically just to keep good thoughts in his head. He even takes the MSF course every few years just to keep in tune. When he's out on the road he'll even practice skills just to see how good he can get. Lately it is leaning to the boards scrape while being clean and quick through turns on his Electra Glide.

You have to love a guy like that willing to learn!

Head turn and control braking with the back brake are my two big things lately.
 

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Teach someone else to ride. I've tought my wife and now I'm kinda teachin' my son when he shows interest. Teaching helps me keep fresh on my riding skills.:)
 

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Every time I ride I do some slow work - the old "figure 8" exercise. A couple of quick stops...etc.

I practice the MSF basic & experienced rider courses at least monthly (I'm a Rider Coach).
 

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Every time I ride I do some slow work - the old "figure 8" exercise. A couple of quick stops...etc.

I practice the MSF basic & experienced rider courses at least monthly (I'm a Rider Coach).
Thats cheatin'.:rolleyes: Good for you! We need more rider coaches.;)
 

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I break stuff.
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Talk 'bout it... think 'bout it... incorporate practice of "something" into every ride.

The ERC is a great tool as well.
 

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......My Title......
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I took a evasive driving course for work (all city employees take it) it was for driving a car but after our class they did the motorcycle course and I watched for a little while. I've never taken any kind of class like that, it would be something good to do though.
 

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On a ride
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- Ride often
- Practice
- Take a riding course
- Read a riding book

The latter really helps. I spent two days at a track school a couple of years ago and the instructors didn't have much to cover with me since I had the techniques down thanks to books like "Total Control" and "Smooth Riding". It was the practice (not the instruction) at the track benefitting me the most.

Oh, will noted this! Rode around the track twice on the back of a Suzuki GSXR1000 with AMA Superbike rider Jason Pridmore piloting. :eek: What an experience. Learned the bikes we ride are more capable and more willing than we are.
 

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STAND AND FIGHT!
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I have fallen victim to "target fixation" twice before, eyes focused involuntarily on a rapidly approaching road hazard, couldn't look away quick enough, and zero'd right in on it. (poor turtle :( ) and cursed rock :mad:

Anyway, somebody's sig on V-Rod Forum used to be "Ride Loose" and to that end, I tend to swing back and forth occasionally, both fast and slow, with the idea that sometimes the bike gets to feeling like it's on a rail and not too flexible, I have also forcefully wobbled the handle bars real hard, to make myself very comfortably familiar with the bike's ability to handle forcibly abrupt maneuvers when needed. I have wobbled the handle bars hard enough that I think that even at speed, if you wanted to work it hard enough, you could slalom the broken white line, at least with the front wheel.
 

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I have also forcefully wobbled the handle bars real hard, to make myself very comfortably familiar with the bike's ability to handle forcibly abrupt maneuvers when needed. I have wobbled the handle bars hard enough that I think that even at speed, if you wanted to work it hard enough, you could slalom the broken white line, at least with the front wheel.
Now ya see, right there you got me a little worried.

Don't be doing stuff like that there.

PS: When you crash and die, can I have your boots :D
 

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Don't be doing stuff like that there
Stuff like what?
Like practice the move it would take to sidestep a dead possum, muffler, or a big rock that comes out from under the car ahead of you, right in your path, and with your 2-3 second following distance, that's all the time you've got to react, force the bike to react, and be somewhere else?

If you don't know that your bike is steady as a rock at speed and forcibly wobbling the front end doesn't make it any less steady, then you're going to have a hard time making that move.

Back in the day, I saw a drunken streaker (naked, for you noobies) standing on the seat of a big old dresser, going across a field at about 35 mph. A big bump bounced him off, but the bike went straight as an arrow, about another 150 yards and crashed into an outlaws campsite.

Anybody can go straight and steady. That's what the bike's gyro action wants to do. IMHO, you need to know how to muscle the gyro out of line in a hurry, in case you ever have to do so.
 
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