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SoundMan
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Discussion Starter #1
Being new to Harley I have a question. Today I wanted to check the torque on the stabilizer link engine mounting screws and the isolator mounting bolt but my torque wrench will not fit. I do not have enough clearance to get the star bit on the screw and where I can get it on the screw I don't have enough clearance to turn the wrench. I have a 2014 Superlow 1200T. Is there a special torque wrench I need to do this? Any help is appreciated.
 

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Poser Member # 99
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what's it look like I have 3 Snap on torque wrench 1 - 3/8 drive In lbs and 2 different 1/2 drive torque ft Lbs wrench's Oh I for got my old bending bar 1/2 drive Craftsmen's
 

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I have just a normal socket wrench and one where you rotate the handle instead of turning it. Most the hard to reach areas I have been able to get to with wobble heads or extensions. The torque I use is just a 3/4" regular but I just use it to torque down and a regular ratchet to tighten or loosen. I don't bother with inch lbs I just make sure not to use tension on them.


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Vapor Locked
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Don't Go Cheap

Spend the money to get a good wrench. I found one on ebay for $120. Get one that is well made like a CDI / Snap-On. Don't think you're saving money by buying a $35.00 wrench. I first bought a TEKTON wrench, Pure junk. I over torqued a cover bolt with it, still kicking myself about it. Think about it, $10,000 motorcycle and a $35.00 wrench? You spent the money on the bike so spend the money on a good wrench. My little rant.

Grampa Kracker
 

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SoundMan
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Discussion Starter #5
Spend the money to get a good wrench. I found one on ebay for $120. Get one that is well made like a CDI / Snap-On. Don't think you're saving money by buying a $35.00 wrench. I first bought a TEKTON wrench, Pure junk. I over torqued a cover bolt with it, still kicking myself about it. Think about it, $10,000 motorcycle and a $35.00 wrench? You spent the money on the bike so spend the money on a good wrench. My little rant.

Grampa Kracker
Sounds like good advice. I bought a Craftsman which I guess might not be the best, but the problem I'm having is it won't fit where it needs to. I'm trying to check torque on the isolator mounting bolt and the stabilizer link bracket as per the 1000 mile service. I'm not sure if I'm just not looking at the right bolts or there is a trick to checking these. I have the service manual so I'm pretty sure I'm looking at the correct brackets and bolts
 

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Señor Member
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My craftsman torque wrenches have been perfect, but I'm not sure that solves the OP's problem. Can you post a pic of what you're dealing with?

Some fasteners I can't get a torque wrench to and I just use the force for torque. Good luck.
 

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As Chief mentioned seeing your situation would help with a solution , don't think a different torque wrench is likely the answer.
 

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As Chief mentioned seeing your situation would help with a solution , don't think a different torque wrench is likely the answer.
Agreed. Also the amount of torque required will help determine if you need 1/4", 3/8", or 1/2" drive.

It may be that you need to use a crow's foot?
Again, pix would help.
 

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SoundMan
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Discussion Starter #9
My craftsman torque wrenches have been perfect, but I'm not sure that solves the OP's problem. Can you post a pic of what you're dealing with?

Some fasteners I can't get a torque wrench to and I just use the force for torque. Good luck.
Here are the stabilizer and engine bracket bolts and screws I'm trying to check. My torque wrench will not fit once the star socket is attached and where the bracket bolts are I have no room between the frame to move the wrench back and forth. The front fender gets in the way too.
 

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I'd put a swivel (U joint ) on your socket then an appropriate extension on the swivel to clear obstructions to your Torque wrench.
 

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For every joint in the line to the torque wrench, the torque value changes. Especially a swivel or extension. Not much, just saying.
 

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For every joint in the line to the torque wrench, the torque value changes. Especially a swivel or extension. Not much, just saying.
Most torque values in the manual have quite a bit of acceptable range, thinking it will be close enough.

I kind of find this hard to believe once load is applied torque should be constant ?
 

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Señor Member
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Most torque values in the manual have quite a bit of acceptable range, thinking it will be close enough.



I kind of find this hard to believe once load is applied torque should be constant ?

Torque to the wrench will be constant, but actual torque to the fastener will vary. I think?

But, what you said about ranges is rock solid, so it should be within specs, regardless.
 

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Most torque values in the manual have quite a bit of acceptable range, thinking it will be close enough.

I kind of find this hard to believe once load is applied torque should be constant ?
You can find it hard to believe if you want. Doesn't change the facts. A crows foot as mentioned will change the torque applied to the fastener. A rule of thumb is add 5lbs. of torque for every 6" of extension. Extensions do twist. Swivels will also alter the applied torque to the fastener. The ranges may be such that these facts are of no concern, but, still something to think about.
 

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You can find it hard to believe if you want. Doesn't change the facts. A crows foot as mentioned will change the torque applied to the fastener. A rule of thumb is add 5lbs. of torque for every 6" of extension. Extensions do twist. Swivels will also alter the applied torque to the fastener. The ranges may be such that these facts are of no concern, but, still something to think about.
Torque Wrench Adapter Calculator - CNCexpo.com


Swivel adapters are a little tricker to calculate than a simple crows foot.

The torque applied when using a swivel varies according to the sine of the resulting angle created when using the swivel....

Still 90° when using a swivel = no change.

72° = torque setting on wrench times .95

So basically if you keep the wrench at 90° to 75° ish to the centerline of the bolt, no need to worry about the change.
 

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Torque Wrench Adapter Calculator - CNCexpo.com


Swivel adapters are a little tricker to calculate than a simple crows foot.

The torque applied when using a swivel varies according to the sine of the resulting angle created when using the swivel....

Still 90° when using a swivel = no change.

72° = torque setting on wrench times .95

So basically if you keep the wrench at 90° to 75° ish to the centerline of the bolt, no need to worry about the change.
You do know that using a program to do all of the calculations is cheating. :spank:

I still had to look it up in the "Bible" . :)
 

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Lol, I don't have to look it up.

I just posted it for the people that don't know the formula. :D
 
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