Harley Davidson Forums banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have an 05 Electra Glide which I have bought used a few years back. It follows every groove in the pavement like it is on a track. If I am not paying attention, sometimes its like someone is grabbing the bars. Any suggestions. Thanks
 

·
Retired citizen
Joined
·
22,294 Posts
I have an 05 Electra Glide which I have bought used a few years back. It follows every groove in the pavement like it is on a track. If I am not paying attention, sometimes its like someone is grabbing the bars. Any suggestions. Thanks
Sounds like the neck bearings need to be adjusted or replaced as needed. Adjust first (fallaway) replace if needed.
 

·
weird member
Joined
·
1,940 Posts
My narrow front tire (80 wide) follows grooves too, but my neck bearings are good. I just learn to avoid them. Part of that is the tires I use, which have multi tread (softer outside tread).

Though, you should check your bearings as @SCHMIDTY said. But, if the groove is just right (depth/width) for a given speed and tire, the wheel is going to want to follow it, that's just how it is.

Mine will even follow the very subtle groove in pavement where it overlaps if it dips in.

If you see construction grooves coming up, switch lane positions to a side of the lane that doesn't have the groove and if the groove is curving over in front of you, try to run over the groove as perpendicular as possible. Example, groove is in the left lane position, stay in the right lane, groove is curving over to the right, go as far to the right as you can, then go left like you're about to pass someone, but stay in the lane, and cross over the groove then point back straight.

If you hit rain grooves that run parallel rather than perpendicular, don't fight them, just be a little loose, slow a little and just let the front follow them and wobble. Takes getting used to the feeling (feels like you're loosing control, but you're not). It'll feel like the bouncing on a concrete bridge between the bridge sections, only it'll be side to side rather than up and down.
 

·
old scoot coot
Joined
·
2,907 Posts
My narrow front tire (80 wide) follows grooves too, but my neck bearings are good. I just learn to avoid them. Part of that is the tires I use, which have multi tread (softer outside tread).

Though, you should check your bearings as @SCHMIDTY said. But, if the groove is just right (depth/width) for a given speed and tire, the wheel is going to want to follow it, that's just how it is.

Mine will even follow the very subtle groove in pavement where it overlaps if it dips in.

If you see construction grooves coming up, switch lane positions to a side of the lane that doesn't have the groove and if the groove is curving over in front of you, try to run over the groove as perpendicular as possible. Example, groove is in the left lane position, stay in the right lane, groove is curving over to the right, go as far to the right as you can, then go left like you're about to pass someone, but stay in the lane, and cross over the groove then point back straight.

If you hit rain grooves that run parallel rather than perpendicular, don't fight them, just be a little loose, slow a little and just let the front follow them and wobble. Takes getting used to the feeling (feels like you're loosing control, but you're not). It'll feel like the bouncing on a concrete bridge between the bridge sections, only it'll be side to side rather than up and down.
like floating on a rock road, relax your grip and let it do the work. i agree with schmidty too. also when front tires are worn out it rides bad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Th
My narrow front tire (80 wide) follows grooves too, but my neck bearings are good. I just learn to avoid them. Part of that is the tires I use, which have multi tread (softer outside tread).

Though, you should check your bearings as @SCHMIDTY said. But, if the groove is just right (depth/width) for a given speed and tire, the wheel is going to want to follow it, that's just how it is.

Mine will even follow the very subtle groove in pavement where it overlaps if it dips in.

If you see construction grooves coming up, switch lane positions to a side of the lane that doesn't have the groove and if the groove is curving over in front of you, try to run over the groove as perpendicular as possible. Example, groove is in the left lane position, stay in the right lane, groove is curving over to the right, go as far to the right as you can, then go left like you're about to pass someone, but stay in the lane, and cross over the groove then point back straight.

If you hit rain grooves that run parallel rather than perpendicular, don't fight them, just be a little loose, slow a little and just let the front follow them and wobble. Takes getting used to the feeling (feels like you're loosing control, but you're not). It'll feel like the bouncing on a concrete bridge between the bridge sections, only it'll be side to side rather than up and down.
Thanks very much for the info. Edd
 

·
Road Junkie
Joined
·
1,852 Posts
I have found that tread pattern and/or depth can also greatly effect tracking on textured surfaces. For example, the OEM Dunlop tires don’t track nearly as well as the Dunlop American Elite or Michelin Commander II. But agree, checking the steering head is first priority.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,470 Posts
Posted this in the Gun Locker, I thought you were having trouble with your front sight!
 

·
weird member
Joined
·
1,940 Posts
I have found that tread pattern and/or depth can also greatly effect tracking on textured surfaces. For example, the OEM Dunlop tires don’t track nearly as well as the Dunlop American Elite or Michelin Commander II. But agree, checking the steering head is first priority.
I will second this. Any tire that grips more is going to want to track more. I would imagine any softer tire (and the Dunlop AE/Michelin CII's both have softer outside treads) would be more prone to tracking in grooves (because it would grab and pull on the edges of the groove harder).

But also I want to reiterate checking the fork stem bearings/steering head. I am unsure what the OP means by the front end wondering.

Another thing worth mentioning is the wheel bearings and endplay.

I don't want to say that all motorcycles will track in all grooves and it not get checked thinking that's what it is and it could be another issue that goes unaddressed.
 

·
Try'n to behave
Joined
·
5,526 Posts
Posted this in the Gun Locker, I thought you were having trouble with your front sight!
Yeah, being in the Gun Locker, I was going to suggest shooting it.🤪
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,849 Posts
Kyle,

I talked to every major manufacturer of MC tires at Biketoberfest and everyone of them told me no manufacture makes front tires in dual compound. I was told, or read, that my Metzler 888 rear was a dual compound, but the Metzler man said no. He said he hears that at every event he goes to, so there is a lot of misinformation out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Here is a video explaining bearing adjustment, fall away, etc.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I have found that tread pattern and/or depth can also greatly effect tracking on textured surfaces. For example, the OEM Dunlop tires don’t track nearly as well as the Dunlop American Elite or Michelin Commander II. But agree, checking the steering head is first priority.
Thanks for the info. Edd
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top