Harley Davidson Forums banner
21 - 40 of 95 Posts

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
The Heims hitch seems to be the gold standard for motorcycle trailer swivel hitches:

Bicycle handlebar Bicycle part Bumper Automotive exterior Carbon

These are about $200. I’m on limited income so I built a diy version for this trailer according to instructions I found at DIY Heim Joint Swiveling hitch coupler. (NO welding!) | Motorcycle 7 USA

Parts cost me $30 at Rural King.

A category 1 tractor top hitch is cut down and placed in the trailer tongue, and a 3/4” bolt is used instead of a trailer hitch ball. From that website:
Hand Gas Wood Metal Auto part

Automotive tire Gas Bicycle part Crankset Bicycle fork

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Bicycle part Bicycle handlebar Bicycle fork

Wood Tool Gas Household hardware Metal


Mine:
Gas Bumper Electrical wiring Automotive exterior Auto part
 

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #23 ·
My wife's trike kit has a whole lot less parts to it. It's a "trip trike" kit. It has small airbags on each side but barely leans. View attachment 815816
Nice!!

This Tow Pac version doesn’t necessarily get good reviews online so I don’t feel too bad planning on using it as donor parts for my camper build.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,854 Posts
Brian; Do some internet & Youtube searching about trailer tongue length, load %, trailer weight bias before you hit the road. There are some bad consequences with the wrong combinations. On the highway is not the place to find them. I admire men getting hands on with their interests.
 

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Brian; Do some internet & Youtube searching about trailer tongue length, load %, trailer weight bias before you hit the road. There are some bad consequences with the wrong combinations. On the highway is not the place to find them. I admire men getting hands on with their interests.
Thanks Breeze. Since I was originally planning to tow with my Silverwing maxi scooter, which isn’t exactly designed for towing but many owners do, I’ve looked into these issues a good bit.

I was trying to keep my tongue weight at 25 pounds or less, 10 to 15% of gross trailer weight, and gross weight at 250 pounds or less, and of course not having too much weight to the rear of the axle.

However, this is the first I’ve heard about specific tongue length. Do you have any pointers about that, or links? (I’ve kept my dimensions and tongue length fairly close to the Helios trailer design.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,854 Posts
Brian; Sorry, I have no specific pointers on trailer do/don'ts. I've just seen quite a few videos of mishaps relating to tow problems (2 and 4 wheel vehicles).
 

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
It’s on its way to its new home. Anyone looking for a Velorex 562 side car? View attachment 815942
View attachment 815943
View attachment 815941
I stopped and got a burger on the way home last night. While I was eating I placed a Facebook Marketplace ad for the side car for $1250. A guy from Pennsylvania responded this morning and we agreed on $1100. He’s picking it up tomorrow.

So I recouped my initial $750 investment and have a couple dollars left over to start the restoration. Given the Sportster’s current condition, I’m going to need it! The paint is remarkably good, but all metal surfaces are corroded, and the old gas in the tank smells like rocket fuel and the inside of the tank is covered in slime.
Wheel Tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive tire
 

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #31 ·
I see some buffing wheels in your future... That's a sweet lookin barn find! Naval Jelly, some 0000 steel wool and have fun! She will shine like a diamond!
Yep! Just got some steel wool, a buffing wheel for my angle grinder and a container of Never Dull.

I’m heading to Harbor Freight tomorrow morning to pick up one of their cheap handheld soda blasters and some Dollar Store baking soda too, after stumbling across this video:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,852 Posts
Keep that thing well away from bearings, and seals! A small error can make for one hella expensive boo boo!
Fire away, but use caution!

Our paint shop at work, uses "PMB" (plastic media blast) to strip the helicopters. That's really interesting how it pulls off the paint and primer, yet still leaves the alodine on the aluminum aircraft. It still gets a new bath of alodine before the new primer anyway. But i can see much of the alodine on the stripped bird.

Here's a trick that may help when prepping the parts for the blaster: Use a hot glue gun to protect areas from the blast. It pops right off with a little help from a slightly rounded flat screwdriver. (this "helps" reduce the scratches) when ya slip too. We go through big boxes of hot glue... (y)
 
  • Like
Reactions: JLR

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Keep that thing well away from bearings, and seals! A small error can make for one hella expensive boo boo!
Fire away, but use caution!

Our paint shop at work, uses "PMB" (plastic media blast) to strip the helicopters. That's really interesting how it pulls off the paint and primer, yet still leaves the alodine on the aluminum aircraft. It still gets a new bath of alodine before the new primer anyway. But i can see much of the alodine on the stripped bird.

Here's a trick that may help when prepping the parts for the blaster: Use a hot glue gun to protect areas from the blast. It pops right off with a little help from a slightly rounded flat screwdriver. (this "helps" reduce the scratches) when ya slip too. We go through big boxes of hot glue... (y)
Oh, excellent advice all around, thanks!

Is the PMB any safer around seals/ bearings?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,852 Posts
Is the PMB any safer around seals/ bearings?
NO! Nothing with mechanical motion gets near that blast! That dust gets into everything bad enough! If it were to get into flight control bearings, they would be scrapped for sure!

The aircraft bead blasted before we begin disassembly, then every flight control bearing bushing and rod is inspected. We do aircraft overhaul. So most everything gets torn apart. (airframe wize) we don't tear down the engines or transmissions. But it all gets a through inspection before and during assembly. Then a new paint job before being sent back into service. It was interesting work....15 years ago, nowadays, it's just a days work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,852 Posts
I must admit, half my time is spent cleaning parts, compartments, hidden areas and a whole lot of that clean up is from our own bead blaster! That is one hell-of-a mess maker! It gets everywhere. Oh, it sticks to grease and oil really well. Add in a bit of good old mud and that makes some kinda plastic / petroleum cement that won't wipe off, blow off or vacuum up and it's fuggin waterproof. (helicopters get mud in the darndest places!). I often find it stuck to the overhead... Really!

This has to be cleaned up very well after all, our primary concern is the airframe. Looking for stress cracks, broken rivets and improper repairs (field repairs) that we have to remake to engineering standards.

This may sound weird but, my favorite job on the Huey / Cobra is: Rebuilding the brakes. Twin rotor with 4 piston brakes on either side. Just don't want to perform this task on the aircraft! When the transmission is on a work stand, it's fun. On the aircraft... ergonomic nightmare!
 

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I must admit, half my time is spent cleaning parts, compartments, hidden areas and a whole lot of that clean up is from our own bead blaster! That is one hell-of-a mess maker! It gets everywhere. Oh, it sticks to grease and oil really well. Add in a bit of good old mud and that makes some kinda plastic / petroleum cement that won't wipe off, blow off or vacuum up and it's fuggin waterproof. (helicopters get mud in the darndest places!). I often find it stuck to the overhead... Really!

This has to be cleaned up very well after all, our primary concern is the airframe. Looking for stress cracks, broken rivets and improper repairs (field repairs) that we have to remake to engineering standards.

This may sound weird but, my favorite job on the Huey / Cobra is: Rebuilding the brakes. Twin rotor with 4 piston brakes on either side. Just don't want to perform this task on the aircraft! When the transmission is on a work stand, it's fun. On the aircraft... ergonomic nightmare!
Fascinating, thanks for your service Scott!

Years ago when I still lived in Pennsylvania our local airport had an Air National Guard Cobra group. I loved to see them fly over. When my boys were younger their Boy Scout troop took a tour and got to sit in them. Amazing helicopters.
 

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #37 · (Edited)
This almost seems like a second barn find story.

A grizzled old Harley collector, who used to own a small town Harley dealership in Pennsylvania and was his own Harley mechanic, came down today to pick up the Velorex 562 side car. He was thrilled about the side car, which he’s going to put on his ‘79 HD 1100, one of his six Harleys.

However, as soon as he saw my barn find ‘91 Sportster he was tearing it apart (with my blessing) to see if he could get it started. He was here for about three hours, just chatting and looking over the entire bike and it’s wiring, etc. then trying to get it started.

I asked if I should pull the plugs and fog the cylinders with oil overnight before trying to start it. He said, “Let me look in the oil tank and check the spark plugs first, and then we’ll see.”

The spark plugs looked like new with no fowling and smelled like decent gas, even though the gas tank itself smells bad. The carb was clean and looked like new, looking through from the air cleaner side. The oil tank had plenty of oil in it.

He removed the old battery, took off the air cleaner, hooked up my lithium starter battery, sprayed ether in the carb, and after several tries, it started right up briefly on the ether.

Then we pushed it back and forth while he shifted it through all five gears, and said that would help free up the frozen clutch.

He said to change the engine oil with non synthetic HD 20w-50, change their primary oil and put an ounce of SeaFoam in each.

Then he said to empty any old gas in the tank and put some lacquer thinner in it, let it sit overnight, disconnect the fuel line from the carb, then drain it out through the petcock.

Then reconnect the fuel line to the carb but disconnect it from the engine, put more thinner in the tank, let the thinner run through the petcock and fill the carb float, let it site overnight, then drain it.

Then fill the tank with gas and some SeaFoam, put a battery in it, and it should fire right up. He said let it thoroughly warm up, turn it off, then push it back and forth again working through the gears, and the clutch should start working fine.

He was originally going to give me $1100 for the side car, but then he started talking about all the parts he had in his work shop that could replace the corroded parts on my Sportster.

He said he had a nice full exhaust system that would fit, an nice air cleaner and horn cover, the side racks that go on the sides of the rear fender beside the seat, possibly a battery cover, and a good set of rear shocks to fit it.

I was almost afraid to ask what he wanted for all those parts but he said he’d give them to me if I’d take $1,000 cash for the side car and could definitely get him the side car windshield (and hopefully the tonneau cover). I know the windshield at least is still in the attic of the farm where I found the bike, but we couldn’t recover it because of a bees’ nest there.

I’m running up to his workshop Saturday afternoon to pick up the parts.


He seemed to know exactly what he was doing and was a walking Harley encyclopedia.

But if ANY of this sounds like bad advice, please let me know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,854 Posts
His advice is thorough. I'd buy a couple $$ of new fuel line from a local parts store, and I don't think I would let lacquer thinner sit in my carb. overnight. I haven't used L. thinner in decades and forgot it's effect on carb. parts. Sea Foam is always a good additive in moderation.
 

·
Registered
‘91 Sportster 1200
Joined
·
55 Posts
Discussion Starter · #39 ·
His advice is thorough. I'd buy a couple $$ of new fuel line from a local parts store, and I don't think I would let lacquer thinner sit in my carb. overnight. I haven't used L. thinner in decades and forgot it's effect on carb. parts. Sea Foam is always a good additive in moderation.
Yeah, I’m reluctant to put lacquer thinner in the carb. But he was adamant to NOT use carb cleaner on the carb, as he said carb cleaner would harm gaskets and o rings but repeated several times the l thinner was safe for the rubber in the carb.

I had never heard of this and I’m hesitant to let it in the carb.

But it’s hard to argue with success; he had an old barn find running on ether with very little effort.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,884 Posts
Lacquer thinner does a good job cleaning carb parts.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BrianInVA
21 - 40 of 95 Posts
Top